Liechtenstein: Government

Principality of Liechtenstein Flag
Coat of Arms of Principality of Liechtenstein

Key Figures

Chief of State: Prince Hans Adam II

Head of Government: Prime Minister Adrian Hasler

Overview

Government Name: Principality of Liechtenstein

Constitution: Adopted: 1921; Established the rule of parliamentary democracy mixed with a constitutional monarchy and also provides for referendums on decisions of the Landtag.

Government Type: Hereditary Constitutional Monarchy

Main Powers Election Process Election Cycle Source: ElectionGuide, http://www.electionguide.org/
Executive

The prince has the power to veto any legislation and dissolve parliament. He also nominates the government, district and high court judges, judges of the Supreme Court, and the presidents and their deputies of the Constitutional Court and of the Administrative Court of Appeal. The prime minister keeps the prince-regent informed about government affairs. All laws, decrees, and sovereign resolutions enter into force or become valid only once they have been signed by the prime minister.

Monarchy is hereditary. Following legislative elections, the leader of the majoirty party in the Landtag is usually appointed the head of government by the monarch.

4 years

Judicial

Supreme Court has the highest authority in civil and criminal matters. Constitutional Court represents the first instance in civil and criminal matters and is also a juvenile court.

Judges of both courts elected by the Landtag and appointed by the monarch.

4 years

Legislative

Landtag discusses and adopts resolutions on constitutional proposals and drafts government bills. Has the additional duties of giving its assent to important international treaties, and elects members of government.

25 members are elected through an open-list proportional representation system.

4 years

International Relations

Foreign Policy Trends: Liechtenstein became a member of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe’s (OSCE) predecessor in 1975, the Council of Europe in 1978, the UN in 1990, the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) in 1991, and both the European Economic Area (EEA) and World Trade Organization (WTO) in 1995.

Regional Trade Blocs: EFTA

Treaties: No multilateral military treaties


International Organization Participation  Source: CIA World Factbook

CD CE EBRD EFTA IAEA ICRM
IFRCS Interpol IOC IPU ITSO ITU
ITUC OPCW OSCE PCA Schengen Convention UN
UNCTAD UPU WIPO WTO

Note: Click table to see details


Environmental Agreements  Source: CIA World Factbook

Air Pollution Air Pollution-Nitrogen Oxides Air Pollution-Persistent Organic Pollutants Air Pollution-Sulfur 85 Air Pollution-Sulfur 94 Air Pollution-Volatile Organic Compounds
Biodiversity Climate Change Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol Desertification Endangered Species Hazardous Wastes
Law of the Sea Ozone Layer Protection Wetlands

Note: Click table to see details


Tax Authority: Information not available

Tax Name: Information not available


Sources:

CIA World Factbook and U.S. Bilateral Relations Fact Sheets except where stated otherwise.

Glossary