Monaco: Government

Principality of Monaco Flag
Coat of Arms of Principality of Monaco

Key Figures

Chief of State: Prince Albert II

Head of Government: Minister of State Serge Telle

Overview

Government Name: Principality of Monaco

Constitution: Adopted: 1911; Enacted shortly after the Monegasque Revolution, this constitution outlines the three branches of government, including several administrative offices and councils, which share advisory and legislative power with the Prince. It also defines the line of succession to the Monegasque throne.

Government Type: Constitutional Monarchy

Main Powers Election Process Election Cycle Source: ElectionGuide, http://www.electionguide.org/
Executive

Prince represents the principality in all foreign relations, initiates the laws, and has full authority in the courts and tribunals. Minister of State leads the government's action and is in charge of foreign relations. Also directs the executive services, commands the police, and presides over the Council of Government.

Prince is hereditary and Minister of State is appointed by the monarch.

Life appointment

Judicial

Serve as the judicial revision courts which hear civil and criminal cases.

Members are appointed by a Sovereign Ordinance.

Life appointment

Legislative

Meet at least twice a year to vote on the country's budget and bills proposed by the prince's government.

16 members are elected by majority vote in mult-member constituencies and 8 members are elected through an open-list proportional representation system.

5 years

International Relations

Foreign Policy Trends: The Principality of Monaco is a sovereign and independent state, linked closely to France by the Treaty of July 1918, which was formally noted in Article 436 of the Treaty of Versailles of 1919. The foreign policy of Monaco is one illustration of this accord: France has agreed to defend the independence and sovereignty of Monaco, while the Monegasque Government has agreed to exercise its sovereign rights in conformity with French interests. Since then, the relations between the sovereign states of France and Monaco have been further defined in the Treaty of 1945 and the Agreement of 1963. Although not a member of the European Union (EU), Monaco is closely associated with the economic apparatus of the EU through its customs union with France and its reliance upon the Euro as its official currency. It is a de facto member of the Schengen Convention.

Regional Trade Blocs: No Regional Trade Blocs.

Treaties: No multilateral military treaties


International Organization Participation  Source: CIA World Factbook

CD CE FAO IAEA ICAO ICC
ICRM IFRCS IHO IMO IMSO Interpol
IOC IPU ITSO ITU OAS OIF
OPCW OSCE Schengen Convention UN UNCTAD UNESCO
UNIDO Union Latina UNWTO UPU WHO WIPO
WMO

Note: Click table to see details


Environmental Agreements  Source: CIA World Factbook

Air Pollution-Sulfur 94 Air Pollution-Volatile Organic Compounds Biodiversity Climate Change Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol Air Pollution
Desertification Endangered Species Hazardous Wastes Law of the Sea Marine Dumping Ozone Layer Protection
Ship Pollution Wetlands Whaling

Note: Click table to see details


Tax Authority: Information not available

Tax Name: Information not available


Sources:

CIA World Factbook and U.S. Bilateral Relations Fact Sheets except where stated otherwise.

Glossary