Czech Republic: Government

Czech Republic Flag
Coat of Arms of Czech Republic

Key Figures

Chief of State: President MiloŇ° Zeman

Head of Government: Prime Minister Bohuslav Sobotka

Overview

Government Name: Czech Republic

Constitution: Adopted: 1992; Dictates the main powers of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Also detailed are the Supreme Control Office, the Czech National Bank, and Territorial Self-Government.

Government Type: Parliamentary Democracy

Main Powers Election Process Election Cycle Source: ElectionGuide, http://www.electionguide.org/
Executive

The president is the head of state who has the power to appoint and recall the prime minister, sign enacted laws, negotiate and ratify international treaties, and be the commander in chief of the armed forces. The prime minister is the head of government, exercising supreme executive power, including the right to set the agenda for most foreign and domestic policy, mobilize the parliamentary majority, and choose governmental ministers.

The president is elected by majority vote through a two-round system. The prime minister is appointed by president.

5 years

Judicial

The supreme court is the highest court of appeals.

Supreme court judges are proposed by the chamber of deputies and appointed by the president.

Life appointment

Legislative

The parliament holds and passes bills, has the right to modify the constitution, ratifies international agreements, declares war, approves presence of foreign military forces in the Czech Republic, and dispatches of Czech military forces abroad.

The senate has 81 members elected by absolute majority vote in single-member constituencies. The chamber of deputies has 200 members elected through a flexible-list proportional representation system.

Senate: 6 years; Chamber of Deputies: 4 years

International Relations

Foreign Policy Trends: From 1948 until 1989, the foreign policy of Czechoslovakia followed that of the Soviet Union. Following independence, the Czechs made integration into Western institutions their chief foreign policy objective.

Regional Trade Blocs: European Union

Treaties: NATO, Common Security and Defense Policy


International Organization Participation  Source: CIA World Factbook

Australia Group BIS BSEC CD CE CEI
CERN EAPC EBRD EIB ESA EU
FAO IAEA IBRD ICAO ICC ICRM
IDA IEA IFC IFRCS ILO IMF
IMO IMSO Interpol IOC IOM IPU
ISO ITSO ITU ITUC MIGA MONUSCO
NATO NEA NSG OAS OECD OIF
OPCW OSCE PCA Schengen Convention SELEC UN
UNCTAD UNESCO UNIDO UNWTO UPU WCO
WFTU WHO WIPO WMO WTO ZC

Note: Click table to see details


Environmental Agreements  Source: CIA World Factbook

Air Pollution-Nitrogen Oxides Air Pollution-Persistent Organic Pollutants Air Pollution-Sulfur 85 Air Pollution-Sulfur 94 Air Pollution-Volatile Organic Compounds Antarctic-Environmental Protocol
Antarctic Treaty Biodiversity Climate Change Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol Air Pollution Desertification
Endangered Species Environmental Modification Hazardous Wastes Law of the Sea Ozone Layer Protection Ship Pollution
Tropical Timber 06 Wetlands Whaling

Note: Click table to see details



Sources:

CIA World Factbook and U.S. Bilateral Relations Fact Sheets except where stated otherwise.

Glossary