Argentina: Government

Argentine Republic Flag
Coat of Arms of Argentine Republic

Key Figures

Chief of State: President Mauricio Macri

Head of Government: President Mauricio Macri

Overview

Government Name: Argentine Republic

Constitution: Adopted: 1853; This is one of the primary sources of existing law in Argentina and discusses declarations, rights, and guarantees; form of government; and divisions of government powers.

Government Type: Republic

Main Powers Election Process Election Cycle Source: ElectionGuide, http://www.electionguide.org/
Executive

The president is the head of state, chief executive of the federal government, and commander-in-chief of the armed forces. The vice president replaces the president in case of absence, incapability, death, or resignation and also acts as the president of the senate.

The president is elected by qualified majority. The vice president is appointed by the president.

4 years

Judicial

The supreme court is the highest court of law and functions as a last resort tribunal, its rulings cannot be appealed. It also decides on cases dealing with the interpretation of the constitution.

The members of the supreme court are appointed by the president with the agreement of at least two thirds of the present senate members.

Life appointment

Legislative

The senate must introduce any changes to federal revenue sharing policies, ratify international treaties, approve changes to constitutional or federal criminal laws, as well as confirm or impeach presidential nominees to the cabinet, the judiciary, the armed forces, and the diplomatic corps. The chamber of deputies holds exclusive rights to levy taxes, draft troops, and to excuse the president, cabinet ministers, and members of the supreme court before the senate.

The senate has 72 members who are elected through a closed-list proportional representation system. The chamber of deputies has 257 members that are elected through a closed-list proportional representation system.

Chamber of Deputies: 4 years; Senate: 6 years

International Relations

Foreign Policy Trends: Argentina's foreign policy priorities are focused on increasing regional partnerships, including consolidating and expanding the MERCOSUR regional trade bloc and more deeply institutionalizing the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR). Diplomatic efforts to assert its sovereign claim over the Falklands (Malvinas) form a continuing point of focus for Argentine foreign policy. Argentina is an active member of the United Nations system and served a 3-year term on the UN Human Rights Council that ended June 2011. Argentina currently has approximately 700 peacekeeping troops in Haiti in support of the UN peacekeeping operation (MINUSTAH), reflecting its traditionally strong support of UN peacekeeping operations. As a member of the Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Argentina has been a strong voice in support of promoting the peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear non-proliferation efforts.

Regional Trade Blocs: MERCOSUR

Treaties: South American Defense Council


International Organization Participation  Source: CIA World Factbook

AfDB Australia Group BCIE BIS CAN CD
CELAC FAO FATF G-15 G-20 G-24
G-77 IADB IAEA IBRD ICAO ICC
ICRM IDA IFAD IFC IFRCS IHO
ILO IMF IMO IMSO Interpol IOC
IOM IPU ISO ITSO ITU ITUC
LAES LAIA Mercosur MIGA MINURSO MINUSTAH
NAM NSG OAS OPANAL OPCW Paris Club
PCA SICA UN UNASUR UNCTAD UNESCO
UNFICYP UNHCR UNIDO Union Latina UNSC UNTSO
UNWTO UPU WCO WFTU WHO WIPO
WMO WTO ZC

Note: Click table to see details


Environmental Agreements  Source: CIA World Factbook

Antarctic Seals Antarctic Treaty Antarctic-Environmental Protocol Antarctic-Marine Living Resources Biodiversity Climate Change
Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol Desertification Endangered Species Environmental Modification Hazardous Wastes Law of the Sea
Marine Dumping Marine Life Conservation Ozone Layer Protection Ship Pollution Wetlands Whaling

Note: Click table to see details


Tax Authority: Federal Administration for Public Revenues

Tax Name: VAT


Sources:

CIA World Factbook and U.S. Bilateral Relations Fact Sheets except where stated otherwise.

Glossary