Mongolia: Government

Mongolia Flag
Coat of Arms of Mongolia

Key Figures

Chief of State: President Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj

Head of Government: Prime Minister Jargaltulga Erdenebat

Overview

Government Name: Mongolia

Constitution: Adopted: 1992; This is the 4th constitution and employs democracy for the country with a multi-party system. The six chapters of the constitution are: Sovereignty of the State, Human Rights and Freedoms, Structure of the State, Administrative and Territorial Units, The Constitutional Court, and Amendment of the Constitution.

Government Type: Parliamentary

Main Powers Election Process Election Cycle Source: ElectionGuide, http://www.electionguide.org/
Executive

President is mostly a ceremonial role, but serves as the head of state for Mongolia. The prime minister appoints the governors of the 21 aimags of Mongolia and the governor of the capital.

President is elected by absolute majority vote through a two-round system and prime minister is elected by parliament.

4 years

Judicial

Highest judicial body.

Supreme Court judges are nominated by a Judicial General Council, but then confirmed and appointed by the president.

Life appointment

Legislative

Draws up new laws in conjunction with the government and decides on their introduction, approves the yearly budget, and has the power to declare war.

The unicameral State Great Hural has 48 members directly elected from 26 electoral districts, while 28 members are proportionally elected based on a party's share of the total votes.

4 years

International Relations

Foreign Policy Trends: As part of its aim to establish a more balanced nonaligned foreign policy, Mongolia has sought to take a more active role in the United Nations and other international organizations, and has pursued a more active role in Asian and northeast Asian affairs. After nearly 2 decades of inactivity, Russia is renewing military ties with the Mongolian armed forces through military education and training exchange programs, as well as joint exercises focused on the repair of Mongolia’s Soviet-built equipment. As part of the December 2010 visit, Russia announced it would increase the number of training slots available to Mongolian military officers.

Regional Trade Blocs: APTA

Treaties: No multilateral military treaties


International Organization Participation  Source: CIA World Factbook

ADB ARF CD CICA CP EBRD
EITI ESCAP FAO G-77 IAEA IBRD
ICAO ICC ICRM IDA IFAD IFC
IFRCS ILO IMF IMO IMSO Interpol
IOC IOM IPU ISO ITSO ITU
ITUC MIGA MINURSO MONUSCO NAM OPCW
OSCE SCO UN UNAMID UNCTAD UNESCO
UNIDO UNISFA UNMISS UNWTO UPU WCO
WHO WIPO WMO WTO

Note: Click table to see details


Environmental Agreements  Source: CIA World Factbook

Biodiversity Climate Change Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol Desertification Endangered Species Environmental Modification
Hazardous Wastes Law of the Sea Ozone Layer Protection Ship Pollution Wetlands Whaling

Note: Click table to see details


Tax Authority: Information not available

Tax Name: Information not available


Sources:

CIA World Factbook and U.S. Bilateral Relations Fact Sheets except where stated otherwise.

Glossary