Key Figures

Chief of State:
President Luis Guillermo Solís
Head of Government:
President Luis Guillermo Solís

Overview

Government Name:
Republic of Costa Rica
Constitution:
Adopted: 1949; Provides for the separation of powers between the legislative, executive, and judicial branches. Also, establishes the protection of private property and the protection of intellectual property rights.
Government Type:
Democratic Republic
Republic of Costa Rica Flag
Coat of Arms of Republic of Costa Rica

Index of Economic Freedom

Grades each country on a scale of 0 to 100, based on ten freedoms, with 100 representing the greatest amount of economic autonomy from government intervention. Source: Heritage Foundation (2018)

Country Risk Rating

A4
A somewhat shaky political and economic outlook and a relatively volatile business environment can affect corporate payment behavior. Corporate default probability is still acceptable on average. Source: Coface (2018)

Government Branches

Main Powers Election Process Election Cycle 1
Executive

The president has limited powers. It cannot veto the legislative budget but can appoint anyone to their cabinet without approval from Congress. The vice-presidents take over reign in the event of the president being unable to do so.

The president is elected by the qualified majority. The vice-presidents are elected on the same ticket as president.

4 years

Judicial

The supreme court exercises judicial power. The constitutional chamber reviews the constitutionality of legislation, executive decrees, and all habeas corpus warrants.

The supreme court is nominated by the legislative assembly.

8 years

Legislative

The legislative assembly's power is vested in the assembly.

The legislative assembly has 57 members who are elected through a closed-list proportional representation system.

4 years

Regional Trade Blocs

No Regional Trade Blocs

International Organization Participation [2]

Environmental Agreements [3]

Tax Information [2]

Tax Authority:
Ministry of Finance
Tax Name:
VAT

Sources:

  1. ElectionGuide http://www.electionguide.org/
  2. EY, http://www.ey.com
  3. CIA World Factbook, https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/
  4. U.S. Bilateral Relations Fact Sheets http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/