Key Figures

Chief of State:
Sultan and Prime Minister Qaboos bin Said Al Said
Head of Government:
Sultan and Prime Minister Qaboos bin Said Al Said

Overview

Government Name:
Sultanate of Oman
Constitution:
Adopted: 1996; Contains seven parts detailing the state and system of government; principles guiding state policy; public rights and duties; the head of state; the Oman council; the judiciary; and general provisions.
Government Type:
Monarchy
Sultanate of Oman Flag
Coat of Arms of Sultanate of Oman

Index of Economic Freedom

Grades each country on a scale of 0 to 100, based on ten freedoms, with 100 representing the greatest amount of economic autonomy from government intervention. Source: Heritage Foundation (2018)

Country Risk Rating

C
A very uncertain political and economic outlook and a business environment with many troublesome weaknesses can have a significant impact on corporate payment behavior. Corporate default probability is high. Source: Coface (2018)

Government Branches

Main Powers Election Process Election Cycle 1
Executive

Sultan also serves as prime minister, defense minister, finance minister, foreign affairs minister, and chair of the central bank.

Sultan and prime minister are hereditary.

Hereditary

Judicial

Supreme Court is the highest court in Oman.

Judges nominated by the Supreme Judicial Council and appointed by the monarch

Life appointment

Legislative

Majlis al-Shura can approve or amend draft laws. Majlis al-Dawla assists the government in implementation of the overall development strategy and contributes in deepening the roots of the Omani society by maintaining achievements and ascertaining the principles of the basic law of the state.

Majlis al-Dawla members are appointed by the monarch and Majlis al-Shura members are elected by plurality vote.

4 years

Regional Trade Blocs

International Organization Participation [2]

Environmental Agreements [3]

Tax Information [2]

Tax Authority:
Information not available
Tax Name:
Information not available

Sources:

  1. ElectionGuide http://www.electionguide.org/
  2. EY, http://www.ey.com
  3. CIA World Factbook, https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/
  4. U.S. Bilateral Relations Fact Sheets http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/