Hosted by Tomas Hult
9:00 AM every Wednesday

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The globalEDGE Business Beat is on the Michigan Business Network and available worldwide on globalEDGE. gBB is hosted by Tomas Hult.

Speaker: Charles Evans, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

Air Date: January 08, 2016

Tomas Hult provided the keynote introduction of Charles Evans, President and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, at his December 2015 presentation to the Lansing Economic Club in Michigan. This segment of the globalEDGE Business Beat captures Hult’s introduction as well as Evans’ highlights of issues related to international business and trade from that keynote and the question session that followed.

Speaker: Alain Verbeke, Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary

Air Date: January 08, 2016

Tomas Hult speaks with Alain Verbeke, who holds the McCaig Research Chair in Management at the Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary. He is also the Research Director of the Strategy and Organization Area, and has recently been announced as the next Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS) – the world’s top journal in international business.

They discuss Dr. Verbeke being recognized and given the opportunity to serve as editor of JIBS, and what it means to him. They also focus on Verbeke’s most significant research accomplishment and what this research means for companies.

Speaker: Constantine Karsikeas, Leeds University Business School

Air Date: January 08, 2016

Tomas Hult speaks with Constantine Katsikeas, Associate Dean for the Faculty and the Arnold Ziff Research Chair in Marketing and International Management at Leeds University Business School, Leeds University; and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of International Marketing (JIM), published by the American Marketing Association.

They discuss Dr. Katsikeas being recognized and given the opportunity to serve as editor of JIM, and what it means to him. They also focus on Katsikeas’ most significant research accomplishment and what this research means for companies.

Speaker: Ruth Bolton, Carey School of Business, Arizona State University

Air Date: January 08, 2016

Tomas Hult speaks with Ruth Bolton who is Professor of Marketing at the Carey School of Business, Arizona State University. She previously served as 2009-11 Executive Director of the Marketing Science Institute; MSI bridges the gap between academic marketing theory and business practice. She will receive the 2016 AMA/McGraw-Hill Distinguished Marketing Educator Award in February in Las Vegas. They discuss Dr. Bolton being recognized and what it means to her. They also focus on Bolton’s most significant research accomplishment and what this research means for companies.

Speaker: Roland Rust, Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland

Air Date: January 08, 2016

Tomas Hult speaks with Roland Rust, who is a Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland, where he is also founder and Executive Director of two research centers: the Center for Excellence in Service and the Center for Complexity in Business. They discuss editing top journals in marketing; Rust’s most significant research accomplishment; and what his research means for companies.

Speaker: Bettina Cornwell, Lundquist College of Business at the University of Oregon

Air Date: January 08, 2016

Tomas Hult speaks with Bettina Cornwell, who is the Edwin E. and June Woldt Cone Professor of Marketing in the Lundquist College of Business at the University of Oregon. Prior to joining the University of Oregon, she was Professor of Marketing and Sport Management at the University of Michigan. They discuss Cornwell being recognized as one of the top authorities on sports marketing, and what it means to her. They also focus on Cornwell’s most significant research accomplishment and what this research means for companies.

Speaker: Tomas Hult, Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University

Air Date: January 28, 2016

This is a keynote by Dr. Tomas Hult delivered at Leeds University in England in December 2013 on "Global Supply Chain Management: Leveraging Processes, Measurements, and Tools for Strategic Corporate Advantage." The session is based on the 2014 book with the same title authored by Tomas Hult, David Closs, and David Frayer (all at Michigan State University, the top-ranked school for supply chain management).

Speaker: Tomas Hult, Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University

Air Date: January 29, 2016

Here you will find a commentary in Fortune, by Tomas Hult, professor of international business at Michigan State University.

The Reserve Bank of India, European Central Bank and People’s Bank of China — which boasts the world’s largest stash of foreign currency — are all growing more influential.

Speaker: Tomas Hult, Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University

Air Date: January 29, 2016

Tomas Hult, Byington Endowed Chair and Professor of International Business at Michigan State University, is the author of the attached article, which was originally published in The Conversation.

News that the People’s Bank of China, the country’s central bank, changed its formula for calculating the reference rate of the yuan (RMB) prompted the currency to fall to a four-year low.

Essentially, the People’s Bank of China is now calculating the reference rate on a daily basis and incorporating market forces. Some financial experts argue that allowing market forces to help determine the value of the yuan is logical, while others assert that China is merely trying to boost its own exporters – at the expense of foreign companies – by making their products relatively cheaper in the global marketplace. Many in the U.S. are concerned that our businesses will be hurt, with some accusing China of currency manipulation.

For the full article, click here.

Speaker: Tomas Hult, Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University

Air Date: January 29, 2016

Tomas Hult, Byington Endowed Chair and Professor of International Business at Michigan State University, is the author of the attached article, which was published in The Conversation.

Back in 2001, former Goldman Sachs chief economist Jim O’Neill coined the acronym BRIC to highlight the immense economic potential of the emerging markets of Brazil, Russia, India and China in the decades to come. They would be the economic engines of tomorrow, he wrote.

The BRICs, which cover a quarter of the world’s landmass and contain 40% of its population, had a combined GDP of US $20 trillion back in 2001. Today these increasingly market-oriented economies boast a GDP of $30 trillion (or 20% of global GDP), a figure forecast to reach $120 trillion by 2050. Together, they control more than 43% of the world’s currency reserves and 20% of its trade..

But times have changed. Every BRIC country is struggling, and the group’s growing footprint means their problems are bad news for the global economy. That’s especially true for the troubles of China, where recent economic gloom triggered a rout in stock markets around the world. All but India’s is now in bear market territory – a decline of at least 20% from its peak.

For the full article, click here.

Speaker: Tomas Hult, Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University

Air Date: January 29, 2016

In an article published in World Economic Forum, and written by Tomas Hult, Byington Endowed Chair, Director of the International Business Center in the Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University, and one of the world’s leading authorities on international business, international marketing, strategic management, global supply chains, and complex multinational corporations, Dr. Hult writes about why the U.S. should not worry about China's currency.

News that the People’s Bank of China, the country’s central bank, changed its formula for calculating the reference rate of the yuan (RMB) prompted the currency to fall to a four-year low.

Essentially, the People’s Bank of China is now calculating the reference rate on a daily basis and incorporating market forces. Some financial experts argue that allowing market forces to help determine the value of the yuan is logical, while others assert that China is merely trying to boost its own exporters – at the expense of foreign companies – by making their products relatively cheaper in the global marketplace.

Many in the US are concerned that our businesses will be hurt, with some accusing China of currency manipulation.

The truth is, however, the value of the yuan doesn’t matter that much: China’s swelling middle class and its insatiable demand for foreign (and US) products and services will easily offset the impact from a cheaper yuan. For now, anyway.

For the full article, click here.