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As the spring semester begins to wind down at universities across the country, albeit via remote online-learning, colleges are already bracing for the worst this upcoming fall.  While it is the expectation that students should be able to return for in-person classes, it is difficult to make that confirmation given the nature of the coronavirus, as many in the public have speculated that it will be difficult to start-up in-person classes on-time given future waves of the virus.  A select number of schools, including Boston University, have already discussed suspending in-person classes through the end of 2020.  In the event that online learning is continued, there will be a long list of academic and economical ramifications that come, which could not only indefinitely change the way higher education is operated, but also impact the communities surrounding them.

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The biggest international storyline of 2020 thus far has been the mysterious coronavirus.  The illness that is believed to have started in Wuhan, China has led to over 6,000 reported cases—and 360 deaths—in China.  Individuals have also been reported to have contracted the illness in 13 other countries, including the U.S., Australia, and Germany.  This past Thursday, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the coronavirus outbreak as a global public health emergency.  With fears intensifying by the day, China and the WHO are working on solutions to protect both foreigners and Chinese people from the illness.  Many of the efforts have been centered around tightening travel security to and from China, halting business operations in China, and quarantining any potentially infected patients.

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The dominant generation of the post-financial crisis era, millennials followed Generation X when it came to be accumulating massive amounts of debt. For millennials, it was student loans, and for GenX, mortgages. Although most millennials entered workplaces with high student debt, their spending power and surveys indicate that this holiday season, millennials are indeed going to deck the halls with jolly, jolly spending.