Chinese culture has profoundly influenced the way a firm does business in contemporary China. With China’s growing economic power and international status, multinational corporations have been increasing their presence in China. Yet, it is truly challenging for practitioners and researchers to fully grasp the unique aspects and diversity of regional business cultures throughout China. Moreover, rapid globalization and development of information technology have enabled increasing numbers of Chinese companies to go international. Understanding foreign business cultural environments is an essential element in ensuring their successful entry into a foreign market.

The main purpose of the 2011 China Business Culture Research Conference, which will be held from 21 Oct. to 24 Oct. 2011 in Jinan, Shangdong, China, is to promote the development of business culture research and practice. The conference will provide a high-level academic exchange platform for scholars in business culture to facilitate their communication and discussion of the latest research output.

Organizer:
Shandong University
The Journal of China Business Culture Research
Jinan Management Science Institution

Sponsors:
MAG Scholar
Asian Journal of Business Research

Conference topics:
The conference will include, but not be limited to, discussion of the following research topics:

  • The Domain of Chinese business culture;
  • International and Chinese business culture development and progress;
  • International business cultural diversity;
  • Comparisons between Chinese business culture and other business cultures;
  • Confucian entrepreneurial culture;
  • Business group culture;
  • Entrepreneurial culture;
  • Regional business culture;
  • Commodity culture;
  • Brand culture;
  • Business etiquette;
  • Guanxi in business;
  • Advertising culture;
  • Corporate culture;
  • Consumer culture;
  • Currency culture;
  • Bazaar culture;
  • Business luck culture;
  • Tourism and culture;
  • Corporate culture;
  • China business culture innovation;
  • Business culture and Chinese management style;
  • Business culture and economic development;
  • Business culture and social development.

Authors are encouraged to submit their full papers via internet to the conference email address: sywh2011@163.com.

A paper review committee, formed by distinguished scholars, will review the submitted papers, and the results will be announced before 15 September 2011.

The conference accepts normative, empirical and practical papers. Selected papers will be published in academic journals such as China Business Culture Research, Journal of China Business Culture Research, and Asian Journal of Business Research.

Conference schedule:
21 Oct. Registration
22 Oct., 2011, Morning, – Conference opening ceremony and keynote speech
22 Oct., 2011, Afternoon – Panel discussion
23 Oct 2011, Panel discussion
24 Oc. 2011, Tour to Qufu, Mount Tai or Ancient Capital Qi (cultures of Qi and Lu)

Important days:
22 Aug 2011 – Deadline of call for papers
22 Sep 2011 – Notification of paper acceptance
22-23 Oct 2011 – China Business Culture Research Conference

Conference Organization:
Organizing Committee:
Chairmen:         Professor Xingyuan Wang (Shandong University)
Professor Zhilin Yang (City University of Hong Kong)
Committee members:
Professor Guoqun Fu (Peking University)
Professor Jiang Wei (Zhejiang University)
Professor Congdong Li (Jinan University)
Professor Dongjin Li (Nankai University)
Professor Jing Huang (Wuhan University)
Professor Xudong Gao (Tsinghua University)
Professor Yuhuang Zheng (Tsinghua University)
Professor Mingli Zhang (Beihang University)
Professor Zhaohua Wang (Beijing Institute of Technology)
Professor Yunqi Zhang (Central University of Finance and Economics)
Professor Ya Sheng (Zhejiang Gongshang University)
Professor Youjin Liu (Xiangtan University)
Professor Yonggui Wang (University of International Business and Economics)
Professor Tao Wang (Wuhan University)
Professor Haizhong Wang (Sun Yat-Sen University)
Professor Fasheng Zhao (Confucianism Research Centre, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences)
Professor Zhiying Liu (University of Science and Technology of China)
Professor Jinlan Liu (Tianjin University)
Professor Hongwei Liu (Shandong University)
Professor Zhijun Chen (Shandong University)
Professor Zuohao Hu (Tsinghua University)
Professor Yongqiang Li (Southwest University of Finance & Economics)
Professor Zhou Meihua (China University of Mining & Technology)
Professor Lu Yudong (Dalian University of Technology)
Professor Chenting Su (City University of Hong Kong)
Professor Alan Cai (Carletin University, Canada)
Professor Kim-Shyan Fam (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)
Professor Michael R. Hyman (New Mexico State University. USA)
Professor Thomas Madden (South Carolina University. USA)
Professor Chenglu Wang (New Heaven University, USA)
Professor Florian Wangenheim (Technical University of Munich, Germany)

Committee Secretariat:
sywh2011@163.com
 

2013 INFORMS/Organization Science Dissertation Proposal Competition Call for Submissions

Submission Deadline: July 1, 2013

We invite you to submit your dissertation proposal to the INFORMS/Organization Science Dissertation Proposal Competition. Now in its 21st year, this competition is one of the most prestigious available to doctoral students studying organizations. Eight finalists will be chosen, based on reviews by experienced referees. Finalists will present their dissertation proposals in a workshop on Saturday, October 5, 2013 at the fall INFORMS Conference held in Minneapolis, MN. During the workshop finalists will receive detailed feedback from a panel of respected organizational scholars who act as final judges for the competition. The all-day workshop also provides a wonderful opportunity to interact with a small group of future colleagues.

At the workshop, the judges will select a winner and a runner up. In order for their dissertation proposals to be considered for this competition, students must meet the following eligibility criteria:

1. Students must have defended their dissertation proposal between August 1, 2012, and August 1, 2013, but not yet defended their dissertation.

2. The expected completion date for students’ dissertations should be on or before July 1, 2014.

3. No part of the dissertation or dissertation proposal may be accepted for publication, provisionally or otherwise, at an academic journal prior to submission for this competition.

We encourage all eligible doctoral students who are studying topics related to organization science to submit summaries of their dissertation proposals. Dissertation proposals addressing issues related to any aspect of organization theory, organizational behavior, strategy, business ethics, or entrepreneurship are welcome.

Submissions should meet the following formatting criteria:

1. Proposal summaries must be no longer than 15 double-spaced pages in 12-point Times font with 1-inch margins. Up to 7 additional pages containing references and exhibits may be included.

2. Because this is a dissertation proposal competition, empirical results should not appear in the dissertation proposal summary or appendices.

Dissertation proposals will be judged based on soundness of theory, methodological rigor, and contribution to the field of organization science. In keeping with the mission of the INFORMS College on Organization Science, boldness and innovation of the dissertation will be important criteria in the judging process. The competition is being coordinated this year by Emily Block of the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business.

We are fortunate to again be using Organization Science's ScholarOne Manuscripts submission system to manage dissertation proposal submissions and reviews. The web address for submissions is http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/orgsci. If you do not already have an account you will have to create one. This is a quick and easy process. Applications must be received by July 1, 2013. Dissertation proposal summaries that do not meet the formatting criteria will be returned to students without review. In addition to the proposal summary, each application must include a nomination letter from the applicant’s adviser certifying that the student is likely to complete the dissertation by July 1, 2014 and the date when the student advanced to candidacy – there is no need for a detailed recommendation letter. Please follow Organization Science's instructions for submitting your proposal.

A couple of important things to note:

  • In step 1, select the manuscript type "Proposal."
  • In step 2, Attributes, please select a few key words to aid in assigning reviewers.
  • In step 4, Reviewers and Editors, do not recommend any reviewers. However, you should indicate Emily Block as your preferred SENIOR EDITOR.
  • In step 5, Details and Comments, paste your cover letter into the window and use the browse attachment function to attach your COVER PAGE as well as YOUR ADVISER'S NOMINATION LETTER.
  • In step 6, Upload Files, upload a copy of your proposal WITHOUT ITS COVER PAGE OR OTHER IDENTIFYING INFORMATION. The first page should include only your dissertation title and abstract.

Please direct any inquiries to: Emily Block, eblock1@nd.edu

Special Issue Co-Editors:

Suma Athreye

Professor of Technology Strategy

Essex Business School

Southend Campus

University of Essex

Email:

suma.athreye@essex.ac.uk

Lucia Piscitello

Professor of International Business,

DIG-Politecnico di Milano

Milan and University of Reading, UK

Email:

lucia.piscitello@polimi.it

Ken Shadlen

Professor in Development Studies

Department of International Development

London School of Economics

Email:

k.shadlen@lse.ac.uk

 

Special Issue Description

Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) have become ubiquitous in current debates about trade and globalization, and have emerged as a key issue of contention in global trade and investment negotiations. The 'Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights' (TRIPS), signed in 1994 as a founding element of the World Trade Organization, represents the most important attempt to establish a global harmonization of Intellectual Property protection, creating international standards for the protection of patents, copyrights, trademarks and designs. As part of the World Trade Organization, it also is subject to that organization’s dispute settlement system, and thus, unlike previous international agreements on IPRs, includes enforcement procedures at the intergovernmental level.

Protecting IPRs of course means different things for firms, who most profit from them, and for governments, who bear the burden of creating the infrastructure for the enforcement of IPRs (and, in some areas, are among the major consumers of goods protected by IPRs). The processes of IP legislation and enforcement can thus be difficult and controversial.  In designing IP polices governments need to mindful of balancing the reward for innovative activity with the incentives for diffusion of that innovation.  Put differently, the interests of the producers must be arrayed against the interests of the consumer. Even within a national economy, this may be difficult as producers are much better organized to lobby policy than are consumers (Olsen 1962).  In an international context this can be almost impossible to achieve without some supra-national intervention. Thus the adoption of TRIPS at the multilateral level and its implementation at national levels has been fraught with conflicts, as many political scientists (e.g. May and Sell, 2006; Ryan, 1998; Sell, 2003; Matthews 2002; Deere 2008) and economists (e.g., Archibugi and Filippetti, 2010; Maskus, 2000; Maskus and Reichman, 2005) have shown.

Nearly two and a half decades after TRIPS came into effect, much has changed in the global innovation landscape.  Technology trade has flourished and more technology has been transferred to emerging market subsidiaries by MNEs. China has emerged as a major power making huge strides in patenting in both domestic, European and US jurisdictions (Hu et al 2017; Li 2012).  Indian public research institutes like CSIR have found patenting has helped them become more self-reliant for funds.  New institutional forms of Intellectual Property which pool patents have also emerged in response to the global challenges.  Examples include the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) to tackle AIDS (WIPO 2011), the GAVI alliance to improve childhood immunization (Kremer and Grennerster, 2004) and the EcoPatent Commons, GreenXchange and Canada’s Oil Sands Alliance (COSIA) to control carbon emissions (Awad, 2015).   

Although IB theories emphasize the role of innovation and technological change in originating and strengthening the competitive advantages of the MNE, IB scholarship has focused mostly on  considering IPR regulations as a location advantage/disadvantage (e.g. Ivus, Park, Saggi, 2017), or an institutional factor (e.g., Peng, Ahlstrom, Carraher, Shi, 2017a, b; Peng, 2013) interacting with MNE  strategies.  This is a narrow view and one that does not address the emerging new institutional developments around intellectual property policy and the effects of these on trade, investment and multinational behavior.

TRIPS also generated new political configurations between governments and business (and other social actors) and, importantly, the use of non-market strategies to influence IPR policy. Understanding these new patterns of organization and political mobilization, traditionally the domain of political economy, is exceedingly important in the context of emerging markets where implementing TRIPS implied substantial changes to national laws and policies. The most studied sector in this regard has been pharmaceuticals, as TRIPS required countries to allow drugs to be patented when many countries previously did not do so. National debates are no longer about whether drug firms should get patents, but how strong the associated rights should be, and how long these rights of exclusion should last for. Shadlen (2017) shows that national approaches to both introducing pharmaceutical patent systems and reforming these new patent systems have been driven by constellations of interests in society (rather than, for example, the ideology of incumbent presidents or the nature of political institutions). These issues, namely how the focal points of debate have changed and the search for drivers of cross-national and within-country variation, are common to a range of global challenges, beyond pharmaceuticals, such as clean technologies and global warming.

As regional trading blocs run into political problems it may be worth reassessing the TRIPS experience once again to highlight what has worked well and what has not. The proposed special issue aims at stimulating a wider discussion on the international patenting landscape, its use by emerging markets and the influence on trade and MNE strategies.  This is a two-way interaction where firm behaviors can help/influence the design of better IP policies, but whose successful implementation in turn requires cooperation from firms (Lundan, 2018). This special issue is aimed at an inter-disciplinary audience in a genuine effort to bring together research that wants to understand the experience of TRIPS and what it offers in terms of IPR policy as the world heads towards de-globalisation.  Related contributions have gradually begun to appear in the IB literature (Journal of World Business, Transnational Corporations and Journal of International Business Policy).  Relevant research has also appeared in other disciplines such as Journal of Law and Economics, Journal of Development Studies and Journal of Development Economics. They provide some stepping stones and research agendas for this special issue.

The Journal of International Business Policy (JIBP) aims to be a leader in publishing high quality research analyzing emerging public policy trends and their impact on international firms.  Through this Special Issue call, JIBP aims specifically to champion research analyzing the contribution of IP harmonization to processes of technology transfer, policy making, capability building and challenges to governance.  This special issue is intended to be a first – but certainly not last - focal point triggering IB scholarly attention to this area. For that reason, this special issue will also be accompanied by a Paper Development Workshop in December 2019.

The following is an indicative (but not exhaustive) list of topics to guide potential authors:

  1. The effect of IPR  policies on technology-related trade and investment
  • Home- and host-country IPR policy effects on technology trade and choice of partners, before and after TRIPS
  • How the spread of global value chains (GVCs) and countries’ and firms’ integration into GVCs affects national IP strategy
  • How TRIPS has affected the internationalization and “off-shoring” of research and development

2.            Domestic and foreign firms and the political economy of IPR policies

  • MNE influence on regional and/or global IP harmonization.
  • MNE lobbying strategies to change IPR policies in host and home countries.
  • The internationalization of trademarks
  • Case studies of national politics around joining the Patent Cooperation Treaty

3.            IPR policies: Trends and effects at the country level

  • Home- and host-country IPR regulatory effects on domestic technological capability and economic development
  • Home- and host-country IPR policy effects on inward and outward FDI
  • IPR and patenting patterns in home- and host-countries
  • The emergence of competition and antitrust institutions as important actors in countries and sectors where patenting is new
  • Understanding the changing demands for stronger IP rules by local actors in industries where imitation and reverse-engineering are difficult

4.            IP implementation and its effect on economic outcomes

  • Understanding the differences between de jure and de facto levels of IP protection and the effect of divergence on technology investment and trade
  • How TRIPS has affected the role of technology transfer offices in public (and private) universities and research institutions
  • IP infringement and its effect on MNE investment and domestic inventiveness
  • Effectiveness of new IPR regimes (patent pooling) for solving the technology needs of global challenges
  • New forms of property right protection (in the digital age); open models for patents

We welcome extended proposals from research in all relevant scientific fields (researchers in IB, economics, political science, sociology, law, geography, innovation, development studies, public policy, and international relations) and especially welcome proposals bridging various scientific disciplines. A paper can be aimed at theory development, but can also be empirical (aimed at collecting and interpreting larger data samples or specific case studies).  To give us a wider choice of papers, our call is for extended proposals which should be submitted to the Editors by 15 December 2018.  Selected proposals will be expected to submit full papers by 15 July 2019.

Special Issue Proposals

Proposals should be written in English and not exceed a total of seven (7) pages and 4000 words – five (5) pages for the body which can include charts, graphs, diagrams, and up to two (2) pages of references. The 4000-word count includes all text in the charts, graphs, diagrams, and references.

Only electronic submissions of proposal(s) will be accepted, submitted via the Manuscript Central portal for JIBP: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jibp. A maximum of two (2) proposals, either as an author or a co-author, may be submitted.

We seek original, unpublished work to move the scholarly conversation on TRIPS forward. Proposals may be rooted in or derived from prior work, but the submitted proposal must reflect significant development. Any proposal submitted that is judged to be identical or substantially similar to work already published, presented or under review for another conference or publication, will not be considered for invitation to develop a full manuscript.

Proposals are easiest to handle if submitted in PDF format. MS Word (or equivalent) will also be accepted. The title should be listed in the header of each page. Please use single spacing and 10-point font or larger. All proposals received by the deadline date (December 15, 2018) are deemed as original and final.

Proposals are reviewed by the special issue editors, so they are not anonymous. Proposals should include name and institutional affiliation of all authors. Authors who submit full manuscripts can expect a standard double-blind peer review process after submission.

Timeline from Proposal to Publication

  • December 15, 2018: Deadline for submission of extended proposals
  • January 20, 2019:  Notification of acceptance or rejection of proposals for development as full manuscripts for submission
  • June 24-27, 2019 (AIB 2019 Copenhagen): Editors participate in a panel that highlights the current JIBP special issues
  • July 15, 2019: Deadline for submission of full papers via Manuscript Central portal for JIBP (https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jibp)
  • September 15, 2019: First round of double-blind peer review of submitted papers concluded
  • December 2019: Revised papers to be presented at a Paper Development Workshop
  • Jan 15, 2020: Editorial notification of conditional acceptance or rejection for inclusion in the JIBP special issue
  • March 1, 2020: Final manuscripts submitted for the special issue
  • June 2020:  Special issue publication

Selected bibliography

Archibugi D., Filippetti A. (2010), The Globalisation of Intellectual Property Rights: Four Learned Lessons and Four Theses, Global Policy, 1(2): 137- 149. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1758-5899.2010.00019.x

Awad, B. (2015), Global Patent Pledges A Collaborative Mechanism For Climate Change Technology, CIGI  papers #81, Canada.  [ last accessed 04/08/2018 from https://www.cigionline.org/sites/default/files/no.81.pdf]

Albert G.Z. Hu, Peng Zhang , Lijing Zhao (2017) China as number one? Evidence from China's most recent patenting surge, Journal of Development Economics, 124,  107–119.

Deere, C. (2008) The Implementation Game: The TRIPS Agreement and the Global Politics of Intellectual Property Reform in Developing Countries. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Ivus, O., Park, W.G. & Saggi, K. (2017), Patent protection and the composition of multinational activity: Evidence from US multinational firms, Journal of International Business Studies, 48(7): 808-836.

Kremer, M., & Glennerster, R. (2004). Strong Medicine - Creating incentives for pharmaceutical research on neglected diseases. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Li, Xibao  (2012).  Behind the recent surge of Chinese patenting: An institutional view, Research Policy 41 236–249.

Maskus, K. E. (2000) Intellectual Property Rights in the Global Economy. Washington, DC: Institute for International Economics.

Maskus, K. E. and Reichman, J. H. (2005) International Public Goods and Transfer of Technology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Matthews, D (2002) Globalising Intellectual Property Rights: The TRIPS Agreement. Routledge.

May, C. and Sell, S. (2006) Intellectual Property Rights: A Critical History. London: Lynne Rienner.

Peng, M. W. (2013). An institution-based view of IPR protection. Business Horizons, 56: 135–139.

Peng, M. W., Ahlstrom, D., Carraher, S. M., & Shi, W. (2017a). History and the debate over intellectual property. Management and Organization Review, 13(1): 15-38.

Peng, M. W., Ahlstrom, D., Carraher, S. M., & Shi, W. (2017b). An institution-based view of global IPR history, Journal of International Business Studies, 48(7): 893-907.

Ryan, M. R. (1998) Knowledge Diplomacy: Global Competition and the Politics of Intellectual Property. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press.

Sell, S. K. (2003) Private Power, Public Law: The Globalization of Intellectual Property Rights. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Shadlen, K.C (2017) Coalitions and Compliance: The Political Economy of Pharmaceutical Patents in Latin America. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

WIPO (2011) Medicines Patent Pool: Facilitating Access to HIV Treatment.  Wipo magazine ( last accessed 04/08/18 from http://www.wipo.int/wipo_magazine/en/2011/03/article_0005.html

Call for chapters for the upcoming book "A Strategic Negotiator’s Handbook: From Local to Global Perspectives". Following chapters needed:

  • Chapter: Negotiation as an Optimal Dispute Resolution Alternative
  • Chapter: Negotiating with Managers from Europe: The French Style
  • Chapter: Negotiating with Managers from Europe: The British Way
  • Chapter: Negotiating with Managers from Europe: The Italian Way
  • Chapter: Negotiating with Managers from Asia: The Chinese Approach
  • Chapter: Negotiating with Managers from Asia: The Japanese Approach
  • Chapter: Negotiating with Managers from Latin America: The Brazilian Style
  • Chapter: Negotiating with Managers from North America: The US Way
  • Chapter: Negotiating with Managers from North America: The Canadian Way

In addition to the above, any other chapter proposals in the field of global negotiation and business/organizational conflict resolution & management are welcome. 

Mohammad Ayub Khan, PhD.

Full-Professor & Director

Marketing & International Business Department

Business School, North Region,

Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Monterrey

Ave. Eugenio Garza Sada 2501, Monterrey, N.L., México, 64849.

mkhan@itesm.mx

+52-81-8358-2000 ext. 4340

http://www.itesm.mx/

Management International Review Management International Review publishes research-based articles that reflect significant advances in the key areas of International Management.

Its target audience includes scholars in International Business Administration. MIR is a double-blind refereed journal that aims at the advancement and dissemination of applied research in the fields of International Management. The scope of the journal comprises International Business, Cross-cultural Management, and Comparative Management. The journal publishes research that builds or extends International Management Theory so that it can contribute to International Management Practice.

About the Focused Issue

Research on the internationalisation of the firm gained momentum in the 1970s. The dominant explanations from this period conceptualised internationalisation as a process that occurs over a period of time. Since then, internationalisation has received considerable scholarly attention.

However, while it is agreed to be a process, internationalisation of the firm is infrequently studied processually. Cross-sectional research designs dominate research in this area, and studies that pose process-based questions (i.e., in the form of ‘How does firm internationalisation evolve over time?’) are rare. Calls for longitudinal research and the inclusion of temporal dimensions are made regularly, but have not been taken up.

This inattention to process persists even though there has been considerable progress in process methods and theorising. Within the field of management, Andrew Pettigrew, Ann Langley and Andrew Van de Ven, among others, have articulated the difference between process- and variance-based research and provided a vocabulary and roadmap for process researchers.

Our aim with this focused issue is to advance understanding of how to study internationalisation as a process. We welcome conceptual and empirical papers that question mainstream variance-based assumptions, propose novel approaches and methods, and use process research to develop, challenge and extend theory in the area of firm internationalisation. We are open to qualitative submissions as well as quantitative papers based on longitudinal data.

Contributions are sought that address the following process-related questions:

1)      What process/es does internationalisation involve? This could include issues such as:

-         understanding specific phases as part of the firm’s overall internationalisation process, e.g. pre-, de- and re-internationalisation;

-         post-entry trajectories of firms (i.e. going beyond the focus on entry mode and locational choices);

-         conceiving internationalisation as a learning process, a process of organisational change, etc;

-         studying operation modes over time, e.g. franchising and foreign direct investment as a process;

-         Considering different units of analysis: not just the firm but e.g. product, business unit or business model.

2)      What methodological innovations are needed to advance understanding?

Possibilities include:

-         business history and historical methods, and other interdisciplinary approaches;

-         methodologies for studying the future;

-         quantitative approaches to longitudinal analysis;

-         ethnographic methods for studying the micro-processes of internationalisation;

-         options for studying internationalisation as a non-linear process.

3)      Once we study internationalisation as a process, what new insights do we gain? Possibilities for theoretical advances might include:

-         Applying complexity theory, co-evolutionary theory and other theories that allow for dynamic explanations;

-         Developing process theories that explain change over time;

-         Taking account of context and its changes in the internationalisation process;

-         Taking a process approach to research on (so-called) ‘Born Globals’ and INVs, the early and accelerated internationalisers;

-         (Even perhaps) rethinking the concept of internationalisation itself.

Submission Information

-         All papers will be subject to MIR’s blind review process

-         Authors should follow MIR guidelines, http://www.mir-online.de/Guideline-for-Authors.html

-         Contributions should be submitted in English, in a Microsoft Word or compatible format via e-mail attachment to catherine.welch@sydney.edu.au<mailto:catherine.welch@sydney.edu.au>

-         Questions can be addressed to any of the co-editors: Peter Liesch (p.liesch@business.uq.edu.au<mailto:p.liesch@business.uq.edu.au>), Niina Nummela (niina.nummela@utu.fi<mailto:niina.nummela@utu.fi>), Catherine Welch (catherine.welch@sydney.edu.au<mailto:catherine.welch@sydney.edu.au>)

-          For further information, see

http://www.internationalisationprocess.com<http://www.internationalisationprocess.com/>

-         Submission deadline: 31 October 2013

About the Guest Editors

Peter W. Liesch is Professor of International Business in the UQ Business School at The University of Queensland, Australia. His research interests include the facilitators and inhibitors of the internationalisation of the firm, particularly the smaller firm.

Niina Nummela is Professor of International Business at the University of Turku, Finland. Her research interests include SME internationalisation, cross-border acquisitions and mixed-methods research strategies.

Catherine Welch is Associate Professor in the Discipline of International Business at The University of Sydney, Australia. Her current research interests focus on qualitative research methodology and firm internationalisation processes.

The competitive landscape has been shifting in recent years more than ever. Globalization, rapid technological changes, codification of knowledge, the Internet, talent and employee mobility, increased rates of knowledge transfer, imitation, changes in customer tastes, the obsolescence of products and business models – have all caused a turbulent environment and accelerated changes and disruptions. These trends are expected to continue in the future, producing ever more rapid and unpredictable changes. Current concepts such as sustained competitive advantage, resource-based view, and strategic planning have been deemed vague, tautological, and inadequate for companies to cope with the rate and complexity of environmental and market changes (e.g., Kraaijenbrink, Spender and Groen, 2010; Lado, Boyd, Wright and Kroll, 2006).

In a chaotic environment in which markets emerge, collide, split, evolve, and die one of the primary determinants of a firm’s success is strategic agility, the ability to remain flexible in facing new developments, to continuously adjust the company’s strategic direction, and to develop innovative ways to create value. There is a tension between formal processes of strategic planning that require strategic commitments for a course of action and opportunistic strategic agility. Strategic planning has been criticized for preparing plans for tomorrow based on yesterday’s actions, concepts, and tools. Although strategic planning can help in specific situations, it usually creates an inertia that prevents fast adaptation when circumstances change or market discontinuities occur. Strategic agility requires inventing new business models and new categories rather than rearranging old products and categories. To cope with growing strategic discontinuities and disruptions, scholars have suggested the creation of strategically agile companies, including new ways for managing business transformation and renewal, developing dynamic capabilities, creating imitation abilities, maintain a high level of organizational flexibility, developing learning and knowledge transfer skills, using adaptive corporate culture, optimizing human resource scalability, and more (e.g., Doz and Kosonen, 2010; Dyer and Ericksen, 2005; Eisenhardt and Martin, 2000; Shenkar, 2010a; Weber, Tarba, and Reichel, 2011; Wilson and Doz, 2011).

The goal of this special issue is to stimulate authors to redefine the spectrum of means and processes available to create and use strategic agility. The issue challenges authors to provide the frameworks that managers can use to integrate, develop, and reconfigure competences and resources required to deal with hypercompetitive markets. Given markets discontinuities and the rapidly increasing pace of change, companies need new and agile paradigms.

We invite papers that focus on strategic agility in both the national and international arenas. We encourage contributions that address but are not limited to the following topics:

What are the origins, components, and outcomes of strategic agility?

What are the roles of early warning systems, communication, learning, scanning, knowledge transfer, training, managerial rotation, and rewarding in the development of strategically agile companies?

What is the relationship between strategic agility on one hand and organizational flexibility, modular organizational forms, conflicts and confrontations, dynamic capabilities (Eisenhardt and Martin, 2000), imitation (Shenkar, 2010b), cultural characteristics (Weber, Tarba, and Reichel, 2011), human resource management (Shafer, Dyer, Kilty, Amos, and Ericksen, 2001) and other existing and emerging concepts?

What insights can perspectives from strategy, economics, organizational behavior, international management, psychology, sociology, anthropology, and other disciplines provide into the nature, antecedents, processes, and effects of strategic agility?

Do strategic sensitivity and resource fluidity (Doz and Kosonen, 2008; 2010) create only a temporary advantage or can they improve performance in both short and the long term?

What is the role of strategic agility in mergers and acquisitions, given their high failure rate? For example, what is the importance of strategic agility components at the pre-merger planning stage (e.g., due diligence, scanning, and screening), the negotiation stage (Weber, Belkin, and Tarba, 2011), and during post-merger integration? What is the effect of various practices (communication, training) within the context of different national cultures (Weber, Rachman-Moore, and Tarba, 2011), and of integration approaches such as symbiosis (Weber, Tarba, and Rozen Bachar, 2011) and hybrid integration (Schweizer, 2005) on strategic agility?

What are the profiles of strategically agile multinational corporations?

Do changes in partners' resources and capabilities cause loss of flexibility to joint ventures, resulting in a high rate of failure? When and how should new modular organization forms be applied in the creation of strategic alliances?

When should management embrace intuitive, improvisational, and action-oriented forms of decision making for the sake of effectiveness?

Please bear in mind that CMR publishes primarily original articles that are research based and address issues of current concern to managers.

SUBMISSION

To consider your manuscript for publication in this special issue, submit your paper by February 29, 2012 to the official CMR website, indicating the title of the special issue.
All papers should meet the submission requirements of CMR: http://cmr.berkeley.edu/submission_guidelines.html . 
The papers will be sent for review following CMR’s standard review process, coordinated by the guest editors. The final decisions about publications will be made by the CMR editor.
Please indicate in your text why and how your paper will appeal not only to scholars but also, and especially, to managers.
For further information, please contact the CMR co-guest editor for this special issue, Prof. Yaakov Weber yaakovw@colman.ac.il .

REFERENCES
Doz, Y.L and Kosonen, M. 2008. The dynamics of strategic agility: Nokia's rollercoaster experience. California Management Review, 50 (3), 95-118.
Doz, Y.L and Kosonen, M. 2010. Embedding strategic agility. Long Range Planning, 43, 370-382.
Dyer, L. and Ericksen, J. (2005). In pursuit of marketplace agility: Applying precepts of self-organizing systems to optimize human resource scalability. Human Resource Management, 44 (2), 183–188.

Eisenhardt, K. M. and Martin, J. A. 2000. Dynamic capabilities: What are they?  Strategic Management Journal, 21, 1105-1121.
Goldman, S. L., Nagel, R. N., and Preiss, K. 1995. Agile Competitors and Virtual Organizations: Strategies for Enriching the Customer. van Nostrand Reinhold.
Kraaijenbrink, J., Spender, J.-C., and Groen, A. J. 2010. The resource-based view: A review and assessment of its critiques. Journal of Management, 36 (1), 349-372.
Lado, A. A., Boyd, N. G., Wright, P., and Kroll, M. 2006. Paradox and theorizing within the resource-based view. Academy of Management Review, 31 (1), 115-131.
Shafer, R. A., Dyer, L., Kilty, J., Amos, J., and Ericksen, J. (2001). Crafting a human resource strategy to foster organizational agility: A case study. Human Resource Management, 40 (3), 197–211.
Shenkar, O. 2010a. Copycats: How Smart Companies Use Imitation to Gain a Strategic Edge. Harvard Business Press.
Shenkar, O. 2010b. Imitation is more valuable than innovation. Harvard Business Review (April), 1-3.
Schweizer, L. 2006. Organizational integration of acquired biotech companies into pharmaceutical companies: The need for a hybrid approach. Academy of Management Journal, 48 (6), 1051–1074.
Weber, Y., Belkin, T., and Tarba, S.Y. 2011. Negotiation, cultural differences, and planning in mergers and acquisitions. Proceedings of the EuroMed Academy of Management 2010 Annual Conference, 1249-1257. Nicosia, Cyprus, November 2010.
Weber, Y., Rachman-Moore, D., and Tarba, S.Y. 2011. Human resource practices during post-merger conflict and merger performance. International Journal of Cross-Cultural Management. Forthcoming.
Weber, Y., Tarba, S.Y., and Reichel, A. 2011. International mergers and acquisitions performance: Acquirer nationality and integration approaches. International Studies of Management & Organization, 41 (3), 9 - 24.
Weber, Y., Tarba, S. Y., and Rozen Bachar, Z. 2011. Mergers and acquisitions performance paradox: The mediating role of integration approach. European Journal of International Management. 5 (4), 373 - 393.
Wilson, K. and Doz, Y. L. 2011. Agile innovation. California Management Review, 53 (2), 6 - 26.

The United Nations (UN) set the agenda to achieve sustainable development by securing the commitment of 193 countries to adopt the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGS). The SDGS represent an ambitious challenge to end all forms of poverty, tackle climate change while promoting economic prosperity and inclusion by the end of year 2030. The 17 goals put forward are: 1) No poverty; 2) Zero hunger; 3) Good health and well-being; 4) Quality education; 5) Gender equality; 6) Clean water and sanitation; 7) Affordable and clean energy; 8) Decent work and economic growth; 9) Industry, innovation, and infrastructure; 10) Raise your voice against discrimination; 11) Sustainable cities and communities; 12) Responsible production and consumption; 13) Climate action; 14) Life below water; 15) Life on land; 16) Peace, justice, and strong institutions; and 17) Partnerships for the goals. Detailed information on the 17 goals can be found here: https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/

States and non-state organizations are called to work together and collaboratively and contribute with financial resources, knowledge, and expertise. In this context, this Special Issue focuses on the role of colleges and universities in achieving sustainable development.

Submissions for the Special Issue could relate, but are not limited, to the following topics:

  • Innovative pedagogical approaches to teaching and learning toward sustainable development
  • Administrative, academic, and student-led initiatives in sustainability
  • Inclusion of sustainable development topics in the curriculum: stand-alone, cross-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary programs
  • Campus design for sustainability
  • Partnerships between universities and stakeholders to achieve sustainable development
  • Overcoming resistance and skepticism among students and staff
  • Teacher competencies in sustainable development
  • Assessment of student learning in sustainable development

Comprehensive reviews, case studies, and research articles that focus on statistical analyses are invited for submission to this Special Issue. Please contact Patricia Kanashiro (pkanashiro@loyola.edu) with questions.

Manuscript submission information

Deadline for submissions: March 30, 2019

Manuscripts should be submitted online at https://raep.emnuvens.com.br/raep and can be written in English, Spanish, or Portuguese. Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the instructions author page.

About RAEP

Administração: Ensino e Pesquisa (RAEP) (ISSN 2358-0917) is the first academic publication in Brazil aimed at disseminating the very latest research in Administration/Management teaching and research. It is published 3 times a year by the Brazilian National Association of Undergraduate Courses in Administration (ANGRAD) for the academic community: students, professors, researchers and academic managers of courses and programs in Administration.

The journal is classified in stratum B1 of the Administration, Accounting and Tourism Qualis-CAPES. The journal is Abstracted/Indexed in Cengage, Ulrich's, EBSCO, ProQuest, Web of Science, Spell, Cengage Learning, DOAJ, DIADORIM, LatinREV and it is published 3 times a year.

Editors

Patricia Kanashiro, Ph.D. (Loyola University Maryland, United States)

Cristiane Benetti, Ph.D. (ICN Business School, France)

Janette Brunstein, Ph.D. (Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Brazil)

Eric Talavera Campbell, MRe (Education Quality Accreditation Agency-EQUAA, Peru)

Friedemann Schulze-Fielitz, M.A. (EFMD GN Americas, United States)

Institutional theory has become one of the most important perspectives in international business in recent years. Researchers have applied theories from neoinstitutional economics and sociology to study how characteristics of the global, regional, country, and industry environments influence the strategies and performance of multinational enterprises. Studies have illustrated the importance of institutional variation for a wide range of constructs, including diversification, foreign direct investment, governance, innovation, organizational learning, and social networks. 

Whereas institutional theory has been helpful in highlighting why and how the rules of the international business game may change in different contexts, many studies have relied on constructs, frameworks, and mechanisms developed outside of the international business field. Our goal with this volume is threefold. First, we would like to encourage international business and management scholars to design new theoretical frameworks of institutions for the different levels of the business environment. Second, we would like to invite institutional theorists to outline potential new theoretical directions for international business researchers. Third, we wish to publish a collection of original ideas that will provide the foundation for future doctoral dissertations and other research projects in international business.

We hope the volume will provide a forum for thought-provoking theoretical ideas, discussions, reviews, and methodological advances owing to its format and our review process. Although we expect to receive mostly theoretical papers, we are open to empirical submissions using different methodological approaches with institutional theory as their main theoretical lens. Furthermore, we welcome papers that are aimed at improving measures of institutions and proposing suitable methods for testing institutional effects.

Information on past AIM volumes and contributors can be found at this link:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/books.htm?issn=1571-5027.

Submission Information
• Authors should submit an electronic copy of their proposal (5 single-spaced pages) to Laszlo Tihanyi (ltihanyi@tamu.edu) by September 15, 2011.
• Authors with selected proposals will be encouraged to attend a session at the Strategic Management Society Annual Conference in Miami on November 6, 2011.
• Submission deadline for full papers: December 15, 2011.
• Submission deadline for revised papers: February 20, 2012.
• Publication date of AIM volume: July 1, 2012.

For additional information, please contact:
Laszlo Tihanyi
B. Marie Oth Associate Professor in Business
Department of Management
Mays Business School
Texas A&M University
College Station, Texas 77843-4221
Tel: 1-979-845-2825
E-mail: ltihanyi@tamu.edu
http://people.tamu.edu/~ltihanyi/
 

There is little doubt of the growing importance of China in the global economy.  Getting access to the large consumer markets in China is an increasingly pressing issue for global advertisers. Advertising in China has developed at a rapid pace as China has evolved from a limited central-planned economy to a globally-focused economic superpower.  This massive change in the advertising industry and supporting infrastructure along with the growing consumer affluence makes China a prime target for global advertisers.  The rapid changes being experienced within China argue for cutting-edge research into the nature of advertising in China and the impact of advertising on Chinese consumers.

Therefore the Journal of Advertising Research (JAR) editorial team is calling for research into advertising and its place and role in Chinese society.  The deadline for submissions is January 31, 2017.

The following list is an indicative, but not exhaustive, list of possible areas for submissions:

  • Chinese consumer reactions to advertising content and media
  • Cultural issues and their impact on advertising/promotions in China
  • Insight into the infrastructural facilitators/impediments to advertising industry development in China
  • Neuroscience insights and Chinese viewer behavior
  • The use of celebrity endorsements in Chinese advertising
  • Efficacy of different media in reaching various Chinese audiences
  • The explosion of mobile in China and advertising strategies
  • Ethical issues in Chinese advertisements
  • Corporate social responsibility and advertising in China
  • Social media use in China
  • The impact of e-commerce on advertising media and creative

A preference is for empirical papers, but theoretical/conceptual papers will be considered if they provide a major advancement of understanding.  Papers should be about building advertising theory and improving advertising practice.  Given our strong practitioner readership, please place particular emphasis on practitioner implications of the research findings.

Optimal length for papers is 6,000 words, with shorter papers encouraged.  Authors can use appendices for material useful, but not central, to the paper. 

Any questions or to submit abstracts for feedback – please contact the Executive Editors:  Professor John B.  Ford for North American submissions (jbford@odu.edu) and Professor Jenni Romaniuk for submissions from other locations (Jenni@MarketingScience.info).

The emerging demographic context for the research and practice of human resource management (HRM) is unprecedented. Demographic shift in the form of ‘ageing societies’ has become recognized among academics and policy-makers as a growing economic challenge to organizations globally and to those operating from within so-called ‘developed’ economies in particular. Whereas some emerging economies and, by extension, some nationally-defined labor markets such as Turkey and Indonesia are experiencing rapid population growth and lower average ages among their populations, others such as Germany and Japan are experiencing a sharp fall in indigenous birth rates and simultaneously a rapidly ageing working population. In short, demographic shift in the form of ageing societies has become a key challenge to HRM policy-makers and practitioners across organizational, sectoral, regional, and national boundaries. 

In this Special Issue we focus attention on two leading global economies, each giving context to historically comparable HRM systems: Germany and Japan. Each nationally defined system is under pressure to maintain equilibrium by seeking alternative working conditions or end-of-career pathways for older employees. At the national level, the response in each case might translate into policies for targeted immigration, increasing employment and career opportunities for women, or the raising of retirement ages in certain sectors. At an organizational level, HRM responses might become manifest in the re-negotiation of company pension and other compensation and benefit systems or the re-designing of work conditions and / or career pathways for older employees. 

The emerging situation is both dynamic and, as stated previously, unprecedented. Consequently, organizations in both Germany and Japan are under pressure to formulate and implement innovative HRM strategies in response to the opportunities and threats to productivity that current global demographic trends are creating. 

Call for Contributions

In the broader demographic context of ‘ageing societies’, this Management Revue Special Issue represents an attempt to identify and compare patterns of responses among HRM practitioners and policy-makers in German and Japanese organizations operating and competing across a range of business sectors. For the purpose of continuity across contributions we interpret ‘ageing societies’ as segments of nationally defined labor markets comprising current or potential employees at the age of fifty and over. In the specific context of markets for employment and career development so defined in Germany and Japan, we are looking for contributions on the following themes:

  • Responding to the employment and career expectations of employees aged fifty and over in the German manufacturing sector 
  • Responding to the employment and career expectations of employees aged fifty and over in the Japanese manufacturing sector
  • Responding to the employment and career expectations of employees aged fifty and over in German public sector organizations
  • Responding to the employment and career expectations of employees aged fifty and over in Japanese public sector organizations
  • Responding to the employment and career expectations of employees aged fifty and over in German service sector organizations 
  • Responding to the employment and career expectations of employees aged fifty and over in Japanese service sector organizations

Notes:

The Editors also welcome expressions of interest from potential contributors offering to write on themes that connect generally with those specified above.  

The Editors especially welcome contributions in the form of joint collaborations between German and Japanese HRM researchers and practitioners.

Final contributions will be around 5,000 words in length.

The Editors undertake to provide full editorial support to contributors who are relatively new to preparing contributions for publication in a quality management journal through the medium of international English: initial offers to contribute can be submitted in English, German or Japanese.

Regardless of each contributor’s language of preference, the Editors undertake to engage all contributors in a cross-national dialogue that should both strengthen the cohesion of the discussion across contributions and establish a global network of HRM scholars and practitioners that endures beyond the publication of this Special Issue.

Deadline

Full papers for this Special Edition of ‘Management Revue’ must be with the editors by February 28th, 2015. All submissions will be subject to a double blind review process. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system at http://www.management-revue.org/submission/ ‘SI Ageing Societies – HRM’ as article section.

Hoping to hear from you!

Keith Jackson (keith.jackson@soas.ac.uk), SOAS, University of London and Doshisha University, Japan

Philippe Debroux, Soka University and Chuo University, Japan

Annals in Social Responsibility is a new journal published once annually.  We are currently seeking proposals for manuscripts to be included in the second volume or to be published in subsequent editions.

Journal Description & What Do We Publish?

Annals in Social Responsibility (ASR) publishes articles covering the significant developments in the area of Social Responsibility.  ASR is a multi-disciplinary journal that publishes work arising from traditions in management, operations & supply chain management, marketing, economics, accounting & finance, sociology, psychology, political science, law, philosophy and other social and physical sciences that relate to the role that individuals, groups and institutions play in understanding of responsibilities and roles in society. Topics covered in the journal include major theoretical and methodological developments as well as current research in the aforementioned disciplines. Articles typically pertain to issues of corporate social responsibility, environmental and organizational sustainability, economic, corporate, social and political development, corporate, institutional and societal governance, property rights, social institutions and NGOs, and global issues of peace, conflict and human rights.  Articles published appeal to a broad intellectual audience in their respective fields.

To be accepted for publication a paper must make a significant contribution to advancing knowledge about social responsibility through new theoretical insights, managerial application, methodology/data—or some combination thereof.

ASR has a particular interest in publishing the following types of manuscripts:

  1. Comprehensive, state-of-the-art literature reviews that integrate diverse research streams and identify promising directions for future investigations
  2. Analytical essays that offer new conceptual models or theoretical perspectives and use these frameworks as a foundation for developing research propositions
  3. Empirical articles that report results from exploratory or hypothesis-testing studies based on quantitative and/or qualitative methodologies
  4. Methodological papers that refine existing methodologies or develop new ones for investigating particular issues or topics central to the fields of inquiry listed above.

ASR Editorial Review Board

Herman Aguinis (Indiana, USA) – Human Resources, Modelling

Ruth Aguilera (Illinois, USA) – Governance, Intl Business

Pat Auger (Melbourne, AUSTRALIA) – Marketing, Modelling

Pratima Bansal (Ivey-UWO, CANADA) – Management, Sustainability

Michael Barnett (Rutgers, USA) – Management, Sustainability

Russell Belk (York, CANADA) – Marketing, Consumer Behaviour

Gordon Clark (Oxford, UK) – Earth Sciences, Sustainability

Jonathan Doh (Villanova, USA) – Politics, NGOs, Intl Business

Giana Eckhardt (London, Royal Holloway, UK) – Marketing, Consumer Behaviour

Jeffrey Harrison (Richmond, USA) – Strategy, Law

Stuart Hart (Cornell, USA) – Management, Innovation

Michael Hiscox (Harvard, USA) – Politics, Intl Relations

Ans Kolk (Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS) – NGOs, Development, Intl Business

Ted London (Michigan, USA) – NGOs, Development, Intl Business

Jeffrey Malpas (Tasmania, AUSTRALIA) – Ethics, Philosophy

Anita McGahan (Toronto, CANADA) – Strategy, Management

Joachim Schwalbach (Humboldt U-Berlin, GERMANY)

Donald Siegel (SUNY Albany, USA) – Strategy, Management, Governance

N. Craig Smith (Insead, FRANCE) – Strategy, Marketing

Tom Sorrell (Warwick, UK) – Philosophy, Politics

David Vogel (Berkeley, USA) – Economics, Politics

Richard Wilk (Indiana, USA) – Culture, Anthropology

Cynthia Williams (York, CANADA) – Law, Governance

Maurizio Zollo (Bocconi, ITALY) – Strategy, Sustainability

Submission Process

ASR does not accept article submissions without the initial submission of a proposal. The objective of the proposal process is to be efficient in the processing of articles. We want to know "what" you are going to say, "to whom" you are going to say it, "why" what you are saying is important, and "how" you are going to convince your audience of the veracity of your argument. This allows the editorial team to provide author(s) with information that facilitates the review process, while allowing us to be proactive in working with authors.

Proposals should be no longer than 5 pages single-spaced with standard 1-inch margins and in a 12-point font. The proposal must include the following information with the following headings.

The idea: The specific important and innovative idea that is going to be the focus of the article.  This should not be long-winded literal description but be a clear and concise statement of the big/new idea that is at the core of what you are doing.

To whom is the article speaking:  While ASR is clearly speaking to other scholars interested in issues of social responsibility, it is important to frame your paper in a specific topical and disciplinary area in the first instance.  Hence, you need to outline who might be the primary audience for your article.  For instance, is it the legal community, anthropologists, or marketing scholars (i.e., to what extent is it disciplinary?)?  Is it those interested in human rights, CSR performance, or social innovation (i.e., to what extent is it phenomenon or topic based?)?

The importance of the idea: Why is your paper important? This needs to be understood as you address how you are going to take your specific knowledge and frame it in a way that resonates with your audience.  In other words, why is it important to your readership and not just to you?

How are you going to justify, defend and communicate your idea: What is the theoretical and/or empirical evidence the article will be presenting in order to convince your audience of the veracity and importance of your idea? If you have specific data sources, outline what these are.  If you are building a theoretical argument, then outline how you are going to logically justify and defend that argument.  If your paper is empirical, provide a brief overview of your methods (e.g., experimental design, econometric model, statistical testing, etc.).

More information is available at: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/asr.htm and submissions are done via manuscript central.

Volume 1 of the journal can be seen here: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/toc/asr/1/1

You can read an editorial discussing the philosophy of the journal here: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/ASR-06-2015-0005

Over time we will be holding a series of workshops on topics of specific interest.  We plan to hold these workshops in conjunction with conferences plus also independently.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the editors.

The U.S. President Donald Trump, following his “America First” policy, has imposed tariffs on imports from numerous countries and wants to modify or terminate current trade agreements with other countries, which has created worldwide anti-globalization sentiment. Journal of International Business and Law (JIBL) is calling for student papers for its special issue on The Anti-Globalization Sentiment and Its Impact on Multinationals. The paper should have a student as a leading or sole author. As for the format, follow the Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS) style at https://aib.msu.edu/jibs The submission due of the full paper is May 1, 2019. Submit to Dr. Boonghee Yoo (boonghee.yoo@hofstra.edu), faculty editor, Professor of Marketing and International Business, Frank G. Zarb School of Business, Hofstra University. The accepted papers will be published in June 2019 in Volume 17 Issue 2.

Inviting researchers to contribute to individual chapters in a book titled “Apparel retailing in emerging markets”.

I am specifically looking for researchers who can contribute to information regarding organization of apparel retail markets, international retailers in the market, buying for these markets, and consumers in these markets. The countries for which I am looking for contribution are:

China, Vietnam, Poland, Turkey, Chile, Romania, Argentina, Thailand, Russia, Spain, Brazil, and UAE.

Contributors will be included as co-authors for the chapter.

Please contact me for further details.

Best Wishes,
Jaya Halepete

Jaya Halepete, PhD
Assistant Professor
Fashion Merchandising
School of Arts and Sciences
Marymount University
2807 N. Glebe Road
Arlington, VA 22207
Office: 703 284 5752

Special Issue Editors:

Introduction

Forty years ago, Buckley and Casson (1976) published The Future of the Multinational Enterprise.. Following the intellectual legacy of Coase’s (1937) transaction cost economics, Buckley and Casson (1976: 33) argued that the multinational enterprise (MNE) internalizes activities across national boundaries “when markets in intermediate products are imperfect [because] there is an incentive to bypass them creating an internal market.” Hennart (1977, 1982), in parallel to Buckley and Casson (1976), contributed to the theory of the MNE by considering perspectives of transaction costs such as measurement and enforcement costs arising due to bounded rationality and opportunistic behavior in markets. Bringing an early resource-based perspective to internalization theory (before the notion of resource based view or RBV had even been coined in the field of strategy), Rugman (1981) explained internalization decisions made by the firm on the basis of firm specific advantages (FSAs) and country specific advantages (CSAs), while Rugman and Verbeke (1992, 2003, 2004) expanded on the geographic reach of these FSAs, thereby making the critical distinction between location-bound and non-location bound FSAs. Rugman and Verbeke (2001) also uncovered 10 distinct patterns of competence building across borders in MNEs that resulted from particular interactions between FSAs and CSAs, thereby acknowledging the joint importance of entrepreneurial action, transaction cost economizing and requisite resource combination inside the MNE. In parallel, the Eclectic Paradigm (Dunning, 1977, 1988, 1993; Dunning & Lundan, 2008) stressed the joint impact of ownership, location, and internalization advantages to explain the existence and functioning of the MNE.  In combination, these theoretical advances have contributed to the establishment of internalization theory as a generally accepted theory of the MNE – and as an analytical framework that has explicitly or implicitly underlined much of the progress being made in International Business (IB) research over the last four decades. Internalization theory allows predicting a great number of organizational regularities in IB. These range from entry mode choices – and more generally the governance of international transactions, including the rise of international new ventures (INVs) – to internal organizational design in terms of structural and strategic governance, as well as the structuring of the interface with external economic actors. Yet, a number of issues still remain unresolved, and new questions have emerged—in particular, about the continued applicability of internalization theory in a rapidly changing world, and about the foundations of the theory in light of new developments in other fields and disciplines. This special issue on Applying and Advancing Internalization Theory invites original research that addresses these questions.

As noted by Rugman and Verbeke (2003: 125), The Future of the Multinational Enterprise was “a superb starting point for the study of the MNE, even if the complexity of this governance structure has grown far beyond what any international business scholar … could have predicted 25 years ago”. This is even more evident today as the nature of the global economy has changed and continues to change. Novel types of cross-border transactions and forms of MNEs have arisen, raising questions about the universal applicability of the theory. It is now time to revisit the theory of the MNE and to challenge its underlying assumptions. More advanced theoretical and empirical approaches promise to identify and explain better the little explored causal mechanisms leading to the existence or absence of MNEs. Analysis of these mechanisms will highlight not only the “why” but also the “how” of internalization theory. To advance this research agenda, we invite manuscripts from a variety of disciplines, including management and organizational studies, strategy, economics, economic geography, marketing, etc. Ideally, submitted manuscripts should improve upon the current state of internalization theory and its implications for managerial practice, by criticizing or extending the conventional thinking embedded within it. We welcome diverse approaches to this topic, including (but not limited to) conceptual models, formal models, simulations, experimental designs, and empirical studies (both qualitative and quantitative ones). Specifically, we invite submissions falling within one or both of the two themes described below.

Theme 1. Applying Internalization Theory to New Realities: Firms and Markets in the Contemporary Global Economy

Building upon general economic principles, applicable across a wide range of empirical phenomena, many scholars have credibly used internalization theory as an analytical tool in different institutional contexts. The theory has allowed explaining the presence of a variety of governance forms for managing international transactions (Casson, 1995, 2015; Narula & Verbeke, 2015). At the same time, few will dispute the fact that the world looks dramatically different today than it did when internalization theory first emerged. IB scholars therefore need to pay special attention to the new realities of the international economy and their influence on the evolution of MNEs.

A key tenet of internalization is that MNEs arise to exploit imperfections in markets, imperfections that are influenced by the myriad changes often referred to under the conceptual umbrella of “globalization”. These include political developments pertaining to economic integration, trade agreements, currency regimes, and other supra-national institutions that transform both the cost of managing firms across borders and of transacting in international markets (Rugman & Verbeke, 2005). They also include technological advances such as internet-based collaboration tools, virtual communities of practice, and online market exchanges, which have equally strong transaction cost implications (Bakos, 1998; Ardichvili, 2008). In combination, these developments have paved ways for new types of firms and novel business models. Firms are also geographically more dispersed than ever, engage in coopetition, have diffused innovation, and deploy global teams as well as virtual organizational structures (Axinn & Matthyssens, 2002).

Accordingly, two issues that loom large in this new world economic system are the growth of the service sector and the advent of the digital economy. The interactions that e-commerce firms have with their customers tend to possess different attributes and thus alter the cost-benefit calculus of various governance modes, as compared to the manufacturing sector (Singh & Kundu, 2002). Increasingly, new ventures aim to internationalize, right from inception, by leveraging advances in information technology. Widening geographic spread, alternative governance structures to access and control unique resources, and internalization of the core of value chain have strong theoretical implications (Oviatt & McDougall 1994; Verbeke, Zargarzadeh, & Osiyevskyy, 2014). In this process, the role of the subsidiary has become more vital, reflected in the growing importance of subsidiary specific advantage (Rugman and Verbeke, 2001; Mudambi and Navarra, 2004; Meyer, Mudambi, & Narula, 2011) and reverse innovation in MNEs (Mudambi, Piscitello, & Rabbiosi, 2014). As reflected in the concept of “meta-MNEs” (Lessard, Teece, & Leih, 2016), the existence of which can be explained by internalization theory (Verbeke & Kenworthy, 2008), the ability to earn economic rents from the creation of knowledge assets in subsidiaries around the world depends upon advantages of common governance. Yet there are also substantial costs of managing increasingly complex organizations and combining external and internal embeddedness in dispersed subsidiaries (Narula, 2014).

The same technological developments, in parallel with managerial and organizational developments, have also enabled MNEs to operate with increasingly porous boundaries (Regan & Heenan, 2010). The twenty-first century has witnessed the growth of networks and coalitions between firms (Dunning & Boyd, 2003), while the importance of relational assets and social capital has increased over time to as firms aim to access new knowledge (Dunning, 2003). The phenomenon of “quasi-internalization” has thus become increasingly relevant in today’s competitive landscape as organizations seek to utilize a middle-of-the-road approach to organize their activities – via both hierarchy and markets. Since the seminal paper of Hennart (1993) on the “swollen middle”, there has been a growing interest on MNEs’ minimization of organizational cost by looking at shirking, cheating, monitoring and other costs, recognizing that the choice is not one between internalization and externalization, but of a contextually contingent combination including outsourcing and alliances (Dunning, 2015).

These developments, which are often closely interlinked, present unique opportunities for theory development as they reveal the diverse strategies, challenges, and imperatives of the modern MNE. For example, does internalization theory apply, or perhaps apply differently, to alternative governance forms and structures, such as service firms, e-commerce firms, conglomerate businesses, state-owned enterprises, born global firms, family-owned MNEs, and Bottom-of-the-Pyramid MNEs? Does the rise of new business models based on new technologies or management principles influence the choice between internalization and externalization? How do MNEs mitigate opportunism, moral hazard, free riding, and other associated costs when generating and leveraging relational assets for productive gains? Is it even meaningful to continue to talk about the choice between firms and markets when the nature of contemporary economic exchange is often approaching one of quasi-internalization? Application of the theory to new and evolving contexts may bring new insights into subtle mechanisms, and ultimately inform the structure of the theory itself. With this theme, we welcome contributions that reflect the applicability (or partial applicability or even inapplicability) of internalization theory to the new realities of the contemporary global economy.

Theme 2. Advancing Internalization Theory by Rethinking its Foundations: Rationality, Learning, and Evolutionary Dynamics

Just as the context of internalization theory has changed, so has the way in which academics within and outside IB think and theorize about this context. With these changes, there is a so far largely untapped opportunity to integrate theoretical advances and empirical approaches from other disciplines into research on the MNE. Such integration has only recently and partially begun to take place, with various perspectives making excursions into the realm of IB. These include different disciplines, such as political economy (Henderson, Dicken, Hess, Coe, & Yeung 2002) and economic geography (Baldwin & Venables, 2013), as well as different approaches to theorizing, such as those related to microfoundations (Foss & Pedersen, 2004), general equilibrium modeling (Buckley & Hashai, 2009), co-evolutionary economics (Pitelis & Teece, 2010), equifinality (Raymond & St. Pierre, 2013), and agent-based simulation (Asmussen, Larsen, and Pedersen, 2016). However, uncharted territory still abounds and it is an open question how these perspectives can be subsumed into internalization theory, and in what ways they extend, refine, and challenge this theory. With this theme, we therefore aim to “open up the black box” of internalization theory and revisit its foundations.

One issue that sits squarely in this black box is the issue of behavioral assumptions. Internalization theory mostly predicts that effective governance forms will prevail, thereby implicitly or explicitly deriving its predictions from a profit-maximizing (or cost minimizing) paradigm (reflecting its roots in economic theory). Empirical evidence, in turn, mostly supports the predictions emerging from this paradigm, including predictions of foreign entry modes (e.g., Anderson & Gatignon, 1986; Agarwal & Ramaswami, 1992), location choices (e.g., Friedman, Gerlowski, & Silberman 1992; Mariotti & Piscitello, 1995), and performance (e.g., Kirca et al., 2011; Kirca, Fernandez, & Kundu 2016). However, we know surprisingly little about how these outcomes actually emerge. At the same time, economists themselves have continued to refine and challenge the notion of rationality. More precise concepts developed within the Coasean paradigm, such as adverse selection, moral hazard, holdup, have further enriched the analysis using the basic internalization approach (Chi, 1994), and imperfections such as bounded rationality and bounded reliability have been more completely developed (Verbeke & Greidanus, 2009; Kano & Verbeke, 2015). Even more radical departures from orthodoxy have come from new perspectives such as behavioral game theory (Camerer, 1997) and fairness equilibrium (Rabin, 1993). In this process, the barriers between economics and the other social science disciplines have become more porous and alternatives to economic rationality concepts, for example altruism (McWilliams, Siegel, & Wright, 2006) and collective identification (Cooper & Thatcher, 2010), have been applied to organizations and business settings.

These observations raise a number of related questions pertaining to internalization theory. For example, who makes the decisions about internalization and externalization? What guides these decision processes in terms of expectations, learning, and feedback loops, and how are those influenced by bounded rationality and by the challenges of measuring transaction costs? Which selection mechanisms (for example, competition in the markets for managers, capital, labor, or products) ensure efficient outcomes and under which conditions? What are the dynamic implications in terms of the evolution of firms and markets in a global context, and the performance of firms in the short and long term? To answer these questions, we need a better understanding of the causal mechanisms underlying the theory of the MNE, the scope of predictions supported by its assumptions, and the consequences of relaxing these assumptions. Obviously, any modifications to the assumptions and analytical logic of internalization need to be explicitly spelled out to ensure commensurability and logical consistency.

In rethinking the foundations of internalization theory along the above lines, new theoretical developments in adjacent research fields may provide leverage. These include, for example, the considerable research efforts on the governance of global value chains that have been undertaken since the 1990s in the fields of sociology, economic geography, development studies, and political economy. Scholars in these fields have examined issues such as sourcing (Gereffi 1999; Kaplinsky 1998; Dolan & Humphrey 2000) and contract manufacturing (Schmitz & Knorringa, 2010). Since the early 1990s, various frameworks have been put forward in attempting to explain how global industries are organized and governed (Coe, Dicken, & Hess, 2008). In their discussion of the organization of economic activities, these studies implicitly relate to the issue of global markets versus hierarchies that internalization theory also addresses, but so far very little cross-fertilization has occurred between these research streams.

Finally, similar to the governance aspects, the spatial aspects of internalization theory arguably remain equally underdeveloped, leaving ample opportunities to further integrate geographic aspects into studies of the MNE (Dunning, 1998). The ongoing analyses of semi-globalization (Ghemawat, 2003) and discontinuities in geographic space (Beugelsdijk and Mudambi, 2013) suggest the need to revisit accepted IB theories with the added insight of supra-national geographic levels, such as regions (Rugman and Verbeke, 2004; Arregle, Miller, Hitt, & Beamish, 2013; Verbeke & Asmussen, 2016), and of sub-national geographic levels, such as cities (Goerzen, Asmussen, & Nielsen, 2013). With this theme, we aim to integrate insights from the above-mentioned disciplines (and potentially other ones)  outside of IB, into our understanding of the existence and boundaries of the MNE.

Conclusion

Of the two themes, the first has an emphasis on phenomena and the second on theory, but both themes have in common their focus on the MNE. Importantly, the two themes are not independent—for example, it is possible that the application of internalization theory to new contexts requires a re-specification of its assumptions, or that the change of assumptions leads to new predictions that require specific context for empirical testing. Overall, the aim of the special issue is to encourage academic research that develops more fine-grained analysis of how the MNE decides on its boundaries and on the organizational forms it takes. On particularly important, “intelligently controversial” questions, the editors may decide to foster debate using a point-counterpoint format. We hope that the collection of papers in our special issue will contribute to the evolving research on MNEs so as to create a more formative unified theory and a common epistemology for comprehending the evolution of MNEs within the ongoing progression of international business activities.                 

Submission Process

All manuscripts will be reviewed as a cohort for this special issue. Manuscripts must be submitted in the window between May 15, 2017, and June 1, 2017, at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jibs. Please indicate in the cover letter which theme(s) of the two described above the submitted manuscript addresses. All submissions will go through the JIBS regular double-blind review process and follow the standard norms and processes.

For more information about this call for papers, please contact the Special Issue Editors or the JIBS Managing Editor (managing-editor@jibs.net).

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About the Guest Editors (Listed Alphabetically)

Christian Geisler Asmussen is a Professor of Strategic and International Management at Copenhagen Business School. Drawing on a background in formal economics but applying a multi-disciplinary approach to his research, he focuses in particular on the interaction between competitive advantage, geographic scope, and organizational structure. His research has been awarded numerous prizes from the Danish and international research communities, including the Barry M. Richman best dissertation award from the Academy of Management and the Haynes Prize for most promising scholar from the Academy of International Business. He currently heads a research project aiming to uncover the drivers of the micro-location choices of multinational firms.

Tailan Chi is a Professor of International Business & Strategy and Co-Director of the Center for Global Business Studies at the School of Business, University of Kansas. He is an editor of the Journal of International Business Studies and serves on the editorial boards of the Strategic Management Journal, Journal of World Business, Global Strategy Journal, International Journal of Strategic Change Management, and Journal of International Business & Economy.   

Sumit Kundu is a Professor and James K. Batten Eminent Scholar Chair in International Business in the College of Business at Florida International University. He is the Vice President of the Academy of International Business [2014–2017] and serves on the editorial boards of Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of World Business, Global Strategy Journal, Journal of International Management, International Business Review, Management International Review, Cross Cultural and Strategic Management – An International Journal, and Thunderbird International Business Review.

Rajneesh Narula is the John H. Dunning Chair of International Business Regulation at the Henley Business School, University of Reading, UK. His research and consulting have focused on the role of multinational firms in development, innovation and industrial policy, R&D alliances and outsourcing. He has published over a 100 articles and chapters in books on these themes. He regularly acts as a consultant and advisor to the European Commission, UNIDO, UNCTAD and the OECD, and a variety of other international organizations. He holds honorary appointments at UNU-MERIT, Norwegian School of Business and Oxford University. 

Tentative publication date:   Summer 2018

Special Issue Editors:

Deadline for submission: June 1, 2017

Tentative publication date:   Summer 2018

Introduction

Forty years ago, Buckley and Casson (1976) published The Future of the Multinational Enterprise.. Following the intellectual legacy of Coase’s (1937) transaction cost economics, Buckley and Casson (1976: 33) argued that the multinational enterprise (MNE) internalizes activities across national boundaries “when markets in intermediate products are imperfect [because] there is an incentive to bypass them creating an internal market.” Hennart (1977, 1982), in parallel to Buckley and Casson (1976), contributed to the theory of the MNE by considering perspectives of transaction costs such as measurement and enforcement costs arising due to bounded rationality and opportunistic behavior in markets. Bringing an early resource-based perspective to internalization theory (before the notion of resource based view or RBV had even been coined in the field of strategy), Rugman (1981) explained internalization decisions made by the firm on the basis of firm specific advantages (FSAs) and country specific advantages (CSAs), while Rugman and Verbeke (1992, 2003, 2004) expanded on the geographic reach of these FSAs, thereby making the critical distinction between location-bound and non-location bound FSAs. Rugman and Verbeke (2001) also uncovered 10 distinct patterns of competence building across borders in MNEs that resulted from particular interactions between FSAs and CSAs, thereby acknowledging the joint importance of entrepreneurial action, transaction cost economizing and requisite resource combination inside the MNE. In parallel, the Eclectic Paradigm (Dunning, 1977, 1988, 1993; Dunning & Lundan, 2008) stressed the joint impact of ownership, location, and internalization advantages to explain the existence and functioning of the MNE.  In combination, these theoretical advances have contributed to the establishment of internalization theory as a generally accepted theory of the MNE – and as an analytical framework that has explicitly or implicitly underlined much of the progress being made in International Business (IB) research over the last four decades. Internalization theory allows predicting a great number of organizational regularities in IB. These range from entry mode choices – and more generally the governance of international transactions, including the rise of international new ventures (INVs) – to internal organizational design in terms of structural and strategic governance, as well as the structuring of the interface with external economic actors. Yet, a number of issues still remain unresolved, and new questions have emerged—in particular, about the continued applicability of internalization theory in a rapidly changing world, and about the foundations of the theory in light of new developments in other fields and disciplines. This special issue on Applying and Advancing Internalization Theory invites original research that addresses these questions.

As noted by Rugman and Verbeke (2003: 125), The Future of the Multinational Enterprise was “a superb starting point for the study of the MNE, even if the complexity of this governance structure has grown far beyond what any international business scholar … could have predicted 25 years ago”. This is even more evident today as the nature of the global economy has changed and continues to change. Novel types of cross-border transactions and forms of MNEs have arisen, raising questions about the universal applicability of the theory. It is now time to revisit the theory of the MNE and to challenge its underlying assumptions. More advanced theoretical and empirical approaches promise to identify and explain better the little explored causal mechanisms leading to the existence or absence of MNEs. Analysis of these mechanisms will highlight not only the “why” but also the “how” of internalization theory. To advance this research agenda, we invite manuscripts from a variety of disciplines, including management and organizational studies, strategy, economics, economic geography, marketing, etc. Ideally, submitted manuscripts should improve upon the current state of internalization theory and its implications for managerial practice, by criticizing or extending the conventional thinking embedded within it. We welcome diverse approaches to this topic, including (but not limited to) conceptual models, formal models, simulations, experimental designs, and empirical studies (both qualitative and quantitative ones). Specifically, we invite submissions falling within one or both of the two themes described below.

Theme 1. Applying Internalization Theory to New Realities: Firms and Markets in the Contemporary Global Economy

Building upon general economic principles, applicable across a wide range of empirical phenomena, many scholars have credibly used internalization theory as an analytical tool in different institutional contexts. The theory has allowed explaining the presence of a variety of governance forms for managing international transactions (Casson, 1995, 2015; Narula & Verbeke, 2015). At the same time, few will dispute the fact that the world looks dramatically different today than it did when internalization theory first emerged. IB scholars therefore need to pay special attention to the new realities of the international economy and their influence on the evolution of MNEs.

A key tenet of internalization is that MNEs arise to exploit imperfections in markets, imperfections that are influenced by the myriad changes often referred to under the conceptual umbrella of “globalization”. These include political developments pertaining to economic integration, trade agreements, currency regimes, and other supra-national institutions that transform both the cost of managing firms across borders and of transacting in international markets (Rugman & Verbeke, 2005). They also include technological advances such as internet-based collaboration tools, virtual communities of practice, and online market exchanges, which have equally strong transaction cost implications (Bakos, 1998; Ardichvili, 2008). In combination, these developments have paved ways for new types of firms and novel business models. Firms are also geographically more dispersed than ever, engage in coopetition, have diffused innovation, and deploy global teams as well as virtual organizational structures (Axinn & Matthyssens, 2002).

Accordingly, two issues that loom large in this new world economic system are the growth of the service sector and the advent of the digital economy. The interactions that e-commerce firms have with their customers tend to possess different attributes and thus alter the cost-benefit calculus of various governance modes, as compared to the manufacturing sector (Singh & Kundu, 2002). Increasingly, new ventures aim to internationalize, right from inception, by leveraging advances in information technology. Widening geographic spread, alternative governance structures to access and control unique resources, and internalization of the core of value chain have strong theoretical implications (Oviatt & McDougall 1994; Verbeke, Zargarzadeh, & Osiyevskyy, 2014). In this process, the role of the subsidiary has become more vital, reflected in the growing importance of subsidiary specific advantage (Rugman and Verbeke, 2001; Mudambi and Navarra, 2004; Meyer, Mudambi, & Narula, 2011) and reverse innovation in MNEs (Mudambi, Piscitello, & Rabbiosi, 2014). As reflected in the concept of “meta-MNEs” (Lessard, Teece, & Leih, 2016), the existence of which can be explained by internalization theory (Verbeke & Kenworthy, 2008), the ability to earn economic rents from the creation of knowledge assets in subsidiaries around the world depends upon advantages of common governance. Yet there are also substantial costs of managing increasingly complex organizations and combining external and internal embeddedness in dispersed subsidiaries (Narula, 2014).

The same technological developments, in parallel with managerial and organizational developments, have also enabled MNEs to operate with increasingly porous boundaries (Regan & Heenan, 2010). The twenty-first century has witnessed the growth of networks and coalitions between firms (Dunning & Boyd, 2003), while the importance of relational assets and social capital has increased over time to as firms aim to access new knowledge (Dunning, 2003). The phenomenon of “quasi-internalization” has thus become increasingly relevant in today’s competitive landscape as organizations seek to utilize a middle-of-the-road approach to organize their activities – via both hierarchy and markets. Since the seminal paper of Hennart (1993) on the “swollen middle”, there has been a growing interest on MNEs’ minimization of organizational cost by looking at shirking, cheating, monitoring and other costs, recognizing that the choice is not one between internalization and externalization, but of a contextually contingent combination including outsourcing and alliances (Dunning, 2015).

These developments, which are often closely interlinked, present unique opportunities for theory development as they reveal the diverse strategies, challenges, and imperatives of the modern MNE. For example, does internalization theory apply, or perhaps apply differently, to alternative governance forms and structures, such as service firms, e-commerce firms, conglomerate businesses, state-owned enterprises, born global firms, family-owned MNEs, and Bottom-of-the-Pyramid MNEs? Does the rise of new business models based on new technologies or management principles influence the choice between internalization and externalization? How do MNEs mitigate opportunism, moral hazard, free riding, and other associated costs when generating and leveraging relational assets for productive gains? Is it even meaningful to continue to talk about the choice between firms and markets when the nature of contemporary economic exchange is often approaching one of quasi-internalization? Application of the theory to new and evolving contexts may bring new insights into subtle mechanisms, and ultimately inform the structure of the theory itself. With this theme, we welcome contributions that reflect the applicability (or partial applicability or even inapplicability) of internalization theory to the new realities of the contemporary global economy.

Theme 2. Advancing Internalization Theory by Rethinking its Foundations: Rationality, Learning, and Evolutionary Dynamics

Just as the context of internalization theory has changed, so has the way in which academics within and outside IB think and theorize about this context. With these changes, there is a so far largely untapped opportunity to integrate theoretical advances and empirical approaches from other disciplines into research on the MNE. Such integration has only recently and partially begun to take place, with various perspectives making excursions into the realm of IB. These include different disciplines, such as political economy (Henderson, Dicken, Hess, Coe, & Yeung 2002) and economic geography (Baldwin & Venables, 2013), as well as different approaches to theorizing, such as those related to microfoundations (Foss & Pedersen, 2004), general equilibrium modeling (Buckley & Hashai, 2009), co-evolutionary economics (Pitelis & Teece, 2010), equifinality (Raymond & St. Pierre, 2013), and agent-based simulation (Asmussen, Larsen, and Pedersen, 2016). However, uncharted territory still abounds and it is an open question how these perspectives can be subsumed into internalization theory, and in what ways they extend, refine, and challenge this theory. With this theme, we therefore aim to “open up the black box” of internalization theory and revisit its foundations.

One issue that sits squarely in this black box is the issue of behavioral assumptions. Internalization theory mostly predicts that effective governance forms will prevail, thereby implicitly or explicitly deriving its predictions from a profit-maximizing (or cost minimizing) paradigm (reflecting its roots in economic theory). Empirical evidence, in turn, mostly supports the predictions emerging from this paradigm, including predictions of foreign entry modes (e.g., Anderson & Gatignon, 1986; Agarwal & Ramaswami, 1992), location choices (e.g., Friedman, Gerlowski, & Silberman 1992; Mariotti & Piscitello, 1995), and performance (e.g., Kirca et al., 2011; Kirca, Fernandez, & Kundu 2016). However, we know surprisingly little about how these outcomes actually emerge. At the same time, economists themselves have continued to refine and challenge the notion of rationality. More precise concepts developed within the Coasean paradigm, such as adverse selection, moral hazard, holdup, have further enriched the analysis using the basic internalization approach (Chi, 1994), and imperfections such as bounded rationality and bounded reliability have been more completely developed (Verbeke & Greidanus, 2009; Kano & Verbeke, 2015). Even more radical departures from orthodoxy have come from new perspectives such as behavioral game theory (Camerer, 1997) and fairness equilibrium (Rabin, 1993). In this process, the barriers between economics and the other social science disciplines have become more porous and alternatives to economic rationality concepts, for example altruism (McWilliams, Siegel, & Wright, 2006) and collective identification (Cooper & Thatcher, 2010), have been applied to organizations and business settings.

These observations raise a number of related questions pertaining to internalization theory. For example, who makes the decisions about internalization and externalization? What guides these decision processes in terms of expectations, learning, and feedback loops, and how are those influenced by bounded rationality and by the challenges of measuring transaction costs? Which selection mechanisms (for example, competition in the markets for managers, capital, labor, or products) ensure efficient outcomes and under which conditions? What are the dynamic implications in terms of the evolution of firms and markets in a global context, and the performance of firms in the short and long term? To answer these questions, we need a better understanding of the causal mechanisms underlying the theory of the MNE, the scope of predictions supported by its assumptions, and the consequences of relaxing these assumptions. Obviously, any modifications to the assumptions and analytical logic of internalization need to be explicitly spelled out to ensure commensurability and logical consistency.

In rethinking the foundations of internalization theory along the above lines, new theoretical developments in adjacent research fields may provide leverage. These include, for example, the considerable research efforts on the governance of global value chains that have been undertaken since the 1990s in the fields of sociology, economic geography, development studies, and political economy. Scholars in these fields have examined issues such as sourcing (Gereffi 1999; Kaplinsky 1998; Dolan & Humphrey 2000) and contract manufacturing (Schmitz & Knorringa, 2010). Since the early 1990s, various frameworks have been put forward in attempting to explain how global industries are organized and governed (Coe, Dicken, & Hess, 2008). In their discussion of the organization of economic activities, these studies implicitly relate to the issue of global markets versus hierarchies that internalization theory also addresses, but so far very little cross-fertilization has occurred between these research streams.

Finally, similar to the governance aspects, the spatial aspects of internalization theory arguably remain equally underdeveloped, leaving ample opportunities to further integrate geographic aspects into studies of the MNE (Dunning, 1998). The ongoing analyses of semi-globalization (Ghemawat, 2003) and discontinuities in geographic space (Beugelsdijk and Mudambi, 2013) suggest the need to revisit accepted IB theories with the added insight of supra-national geographic levels, such as regions (Rugman and Verbeke, 2004; Arregle, Miller, Hitt, & Beamish, 2013; Verbeke & Asmussen, 2016), and of sub-national geographic levels, such as cities (Goerzen, Asmussen, & Nielsen, 2013). With this theme, we aim to integrate insights from the above-mentioned disciplines (and potentially other ones)  outside of IB, into our understanding of the existence and boundaries of the MNE.

Conclusion

Of the two themes, the first has an emphasis on phenomena and the second on theory, but both themes have in common their focus on the MNE. Importantly, the two themes are not independent—for example, it is possible that the application of internalization theory to new contexts requires a re-specification of its assumptions, or that the change of assumptions leads to new predictions that require specific context for empirical testing. Overall, the aim of the special issue is to encourage academic research that develops more fine-grained analysis of how the MNE decides on its boundaries and on the organizational forms it takes. On particularly important, “intelligently controversial” questions, the editors may decide to foster debate using a point-counterpoint format. We hope that the collection of papers in our special issue will contribute to the evolving research on MNEs so as to create a more formative unified theory and a common epistemology for comprehending the evolution of MNEs within the ongoing progression of international business activities.                

Submission Process

All manuscripts will be reviewed as a cohort for this special issue. Manuscripts must be submitted in the window between May 15, 2017, and June 1, 2017, at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jibs. Please indicate in the cover letter which theme(s) of the two described above the submitted manuscript addresses. All submissions will go through the JIBS regular double-blind review process and follow the standard norms and processes.

For more information about this call for papers, please contact the Special Issue Editors or the JIBS Managing Editor (managing-editor@jibs.net).

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Rugman, A. M., & Verbeke, A. 2003. Extending the theory of the multinational enterprise: internalization and strategic management perspectives. Journal of International Business Studies, 34(2), 125-137.

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About the Guest Editors (Listed Alphabetically)

Christian Geisler Asmussen is a Professor of Strategic and International Management at Copenhagen Business School. Drawing on a background in formal economics but applying a multi-disciplinary approach to his research, he focuses in particular on the interaction between competitive advantage, geographic scope, and organizational structure. His research has been awarded numerous prizes from the Danish and international research communities, including the Barry M. Richman best dissertation award from the Academy of Management and the Haynes Prize for most promising scholar from the Academy of International Business. He currently heads a research project aiming to uncover the drivers of the micro-location choices of multinational firms.

Tailan Chi is a Professor of International Business & Strategy and Co-Director of the Center for Global Business Studies at the School of Business, University of Kansas. He is an editor of the Journal of International Business Studies and serves on the editorial boards of the Strategic Management Journal, Journal of World Business, Global Strategy Journal, International Journal of Strategic Change Management, and Journal of International Business & Economy.   

Sumit Kundu is a Professor and James K. Batten Eminent Scholar Chair in International Business in the College of Business at Florida International University. He is the Vice President of the Academy of International Business [2014–2017] and serves on the editorial boards of Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of World Business, Global Strategy Journal, Journal of International Management, International Business Review, Management International Review, Cross Cultural and Strategic Management – An International Journal, and Thunderbird International Business Review.

Rajneesh Narula is the John H. Dunning Chair of International Business Regulation at the Henley Business School, University of Reading, UK. His research and consulting have focused on the role of multinational firms in development, innovation and industrial policy, R&D alliances and outsourcing. He has published over a 100 articles and chapters in books on these themes. He regularly acts as a consultant and advisor to the European Commission, UNIDO, UNCTAD and the OECD, and a variety of other international organizations. He holds honorary appointments at UNU-MERIT, Norwegian School of Business and Oxford University.

Note: Special issue conference will be held at Tongji University, Shanghai, China, December 19–20, 2012.

A ten page paper proposal should be submitted by October 31, 2012 (see submission process below)

Over the past two decades, many Asian economies have grown dramatically with an average growth of about 8% per year throughout the region. This dramatic economic growth has allowed large numbers of people to move out of poverty. However, it is increasingly clear that while there has been dramatic improvement in the overall rates of poverty in many nations in Asia, there are large numbers of people still in poverty in spite of the fast economic growth. For example, China continues to have over 300 million people that live in severe poverty while India has over 600 million. The large number of the severely poor people has increasingly been recognized as an issue for both governments and for businesses throughout Asia.

Governments and businesses understand that for continued economic growth, there needs to be political stability. For governments the presence of large numbers of the severely poor whose lives do not seem to be able to improve despite rapid economic growth offers a potential challenge to the needed political stability. However, businesses increasingly also see the large number of people in severe poverty are not only an issue for social concern, but also as a potentially large untapped market of consumers for goods and services. This ability to provide products to those desperately poor may in fact be easiest for firms in Asia as they internationalize and understand these markets. Asian multinational and entrepreneurial firms’ environmental setting includes such potential customers where major North American and European firms typically have no major access or understanding of this setting that is immediately at hand.

The recognition of the desperately poor as a potential market will not only lead to  new sales for these firms but also offers a means to help those individuals in desperate poverty to create assets and prosperity. As a result, there is a fresh recognition that business in fact may offer the greatest single potential means to move individuals out of poverty. The generation of greater economic activity among the desperately poor may provide the means for the poor to change their own lives rather than the government or other groups doing for them. This has led to a focus by both governments and businesses to seek to encourage greater economic activity among the desperately poor. This activity includes not only business seeking to enter these settings but governments also looking to support other activities by non-profit organizations (NGOs) that generate business among the poor.

Management scholars have been slow to identify and examine an array of questions associated with the increasing entry of international business into settings of desperate poverty and the actions of government to support economic activity among the desperately poor. We believe that through poverty–business focused research, scholars can better understand businesses’ role in both helping Asia to reduce poverty, and also generating profit for companies as they reach out to serve these large untapped communities of consumers.

This APJM Special Issue seeks to provide a robust analysis of poverty and business in the Asian context. We want to generate new insights on poverty in the Asian context and how business can help to move people out of desperate poverty. Overall, the editors’ belief is that as business helps to generate greater economic activity in settings of severe poverty they will help to solve poverty as individuals in severe poverty are able to both generate greater incomes and accumulate greater assets as they participate with those large firms in those activities. Thus, a rich range of topics can be included in the special issue as we look at new and innovative activities that help to address these issues. 

For example, we hope to receive research that will expand the limited research on major corporations serving the “bottom of the pyramid” or “subsistence markets” and how firms create such innovative methods to serve these markets. In addition, we are also interested in seeing articles that address how bringing business skills and ideas to settings of severe poverty can address the issues of poverty. There are also new technologies that help to solve the issues of poverty such as cell-phone banking. How do firms developing such technologies ensure that their products meet the needs of very different customer than have been typically addressed? In addition, how government policy can encourage more economic activity in settings of severe poverty, micro lending by governmental and NGOs, and the role of informal firms are also encouraged.

All else being equal, we encourage interdisciplinary teams to explore the above issues and also encourage diversity of thinking to create the path-breaking insights that we seek. Research questions of potential interest for this special issue could include, but are not limited to:

1.   There are numerous enterprising individuals in Asia living in severe poverty with innovative ideas but without sufficient access to financial resources. What can be done to facilitate the transition of these innovative ideas to generate business venture growth in Asia? What is the role of microfinance in the effort to address this shortage of financial resources?

2.   Many individuals in poverty form informal firms—firms that do not conduct legal activities but which do not register with the government. What is the nature of these firms? How does being an informal firm enable or restrict the ability of such firms for both survival and growth.

3.   What is the role of networks and alliances by individuals in Asia living in severe poverty as they seek to either found or grow a business?

4.   When firms seek to serve those that live in desperate poverty what are the strategic actions of the business that generate the greatest success? What are the ethical issues a firm must address as they seek to serve and compete in this domain in Asia as they pursue those activities?

5.   What are the actions of governments that help to generate the greatest success as firms both seek to address issues of poverty and to serve and compete in markets characterized by desperate poverty?

6.   What alliances between for-profit firms and NGOs help to generate the greatest reduction in poverty? In such alliances, what are the factors that generate the greatest success for business?

7.   How do the issues of poverty and business differ across Asia? Particularly, as we consider the two largest economies in the region, China and India, what are the substantive differences of how business competes to serve the desperate poor in these two markets?

8.   How do the innovation processes of firms differ as they seek to address those living at the bottom of the pyramid? Are Asian firms that come from these settings able to develop unique or more appropriate solutions than are firms from richer countries?

Submission Process

The submission process for this special issue shall be different than those typically pursued by APJM. Individuals are encouraged to submit a proposal to the special issue conference prior to submission of the article to the journal. This proposal should be 10 pages in length and submitted by October 31, 2012. Those proposals found to be relevant to the special issue will be asked to make a short presentation of their proposal to a conference focused on the special issue.

The special issue conference will be held at Tongji University in Shanghai, China, December 19–20, 2012. Proposals will receive brief comments at the conference. From the larger set of proposals presented, a smaller subset of papers will be encouraged to be submitted to the special issue. This subset will receive more extensive comments from the editors on how the paper should be developed for submission to the special issue.

The papers in this subset of selected proposals will be sent out for peer review. While those who cannot attend the proposal conference may submit to the special issue, authors are strongly encouraged to participate in this conference and the proposal system that is established. The submission of papers for the special issue is May 20, 2013. The expected publication date is 2014.

For questions regarding the conference and the special issue and the submission, please contact the guest editors: Garry Bruton g.bruton@tcu.edu, David Ahlstrom Ahlstrom@baf.msmail.cuhk.edu.hk, and/or Steven Si ssi@bloomu.edu.

Asian Business & Management (ABM) invites proposals for a special issue to be published in December 2017.

Please submit your proposal to the Editor-in-Chief (Michael A. Witt, abm.editor@insead.edu) with the following information:

  1. The names, contact details, and positions of the proposed Guest Editor(s).  Please include brief biographical details.
  2. The title of the proposed special issue.
  3. An indication of the type of special issue--invited submissions, open call for paper submissions, or a mix.  
  4. If there is to be an open call for papers: a one-page draft “Call for Papers” indicating the theme of the special issue, key topics, and methodological considerations (if any).
  5. For any invited papers: 300-word abstracts of the planned invited contributions, plus information about the authors and a confirmation of their commitment.
  6. Two to three pages on the rationale of the proposal, its intended scope, its intended contribution relative to existing knowledge, and its fit vis-a-vis ABM editorial policy (http://www.palgrave-journals.com/abm/journal/v11/n1/full/abm201123a.html).

Please submit your proposal by 31 May 2016.  A committee of the editors of ABM will assess all received proposals and announce their decision by 11 June 2016.

Guest editors will be responsible for ensuring that the special issue adheres to our editorial policy and formal guidelines.  All manuscripts, including invited pieces, will undergo a standard double-blind review.  Guest editors are expected to contribute a substantively meaningful editorial for the special issues.  Guest editors may submit their own papers for the special issue; review of these papers will be handled by a regular Editor of the journal, and acceptance is subject to the same standards as any other papers submitted to ABM.

The approximate timeline of the special issue is as follows: 

  • 31 May 2016: Submission deadline for proposals
  • June 2016: Issue of public “Call for Papers” for the special issue
  • Late November 2016: Deadline for first submission of papers, begin of review process
  • September 2017: Deadline for submission of final manuscripts to publisher (precise date TBC)

For any questions, please contact me at abm.editor@insead.edu.

Submission Deadline: February 16, 2015

Program Chair: Carol Reade, San José State University

AJBS will hold its 28th Annual Meeting in cooperation with the Academy of International Business (AIB) in Bengaluru, India. The combined conference will run from June 26th through June 30th. The AJBS conference is June 26-27 (full day June 26th and half day June 27th) and the AIB conference is June 27-30, 2015).  The Program Chair for this year’s conference is Carol Reade, San José State University, USA.

About AJBS: From its genesis as an informal network in 1982, AJBS was officially organized and held its first conference at the Wharton Business School in January, 1987. AJBS holds annual conferences at venues throughout the world, providing an opportunity for discussion of current developments and research on a range of business, public policy and teaching issues related to Japan. Papers for AJBS conference presentation are double blind peer reviewed. Accepted papers are considered for publication in the journal, Asian Business & Management (ABM). AJBS welcomes scholars, students and practitioners from all disciplinary backgrounds who are interested in Japanese business issues.

Why should you participate in both (AJBS and AIB) conferences?  With one trip, you can attend both the most prestigious professional meeting in international business and an intimate conference that focuses specifically on Japanese business issues. The AJBS conference provides additional opportunities for journal publication and best paper awards, as detailed below.

Paper Submission: Authors may submit papers to either or both conferences. AJBS will consider submissions that have already been presented elsewhere, but not published in a journal or book. Authors are encouraged to consider submitting a paper tailored to the specialized audience at the AJBS conference as well as a modified version appropriate for the wider audience at AIB. As done in past years, we also plan to have one session run by AJBS at the AIB conference.

Submission Deadline: Monday, February 16, 2015.  You can submit your paper via http://aib.msu.edu/events/2015/SubmissionInstructions.asp. We kindly ask you to upload your paper in MS-Word format. Submissions must be on letter paper (8.5"x11" or 216x279 mm), with double-spaced text and a font size of 11 points or larger. Please follow the JIBS style guide (http://www.palgrave-journals.com/jibs/style_guide.html).

Please submit papers in MS-Word format (if MS-Word format is not available, please use a basic text format that can be easily converted to MS-Word. Please do not submit papers in PDF format.). To facilitate the blind review process, remove ALL author-identifying information from the papers. Papers will be double-blind reviewed, with the conference papers selected and authors notified by early April, 2015.

Conference Registration: Registration for the conference will include a specially-discounted combined (AJBS plus AIB) conference fee, a one-year membership to AJBS (if not already a member) and a one-year subscription to Asian Business & Management

Asian Business & Management: In 2003 AJBS established a partnership with the journal Asian Business & Management (ABM), published by Palgrave Macmillan in the U.K. As in recent years, the editor of ABM, together with the AJBS conference committee, will select several papers from this year's conference program to be considered for publication in ABM. 

Palgrave Macmillan – AJBS Best Paper Award:  Palgrave Macmillan has sponsored a ‘Best Paper’ prize at the annual AJBS meetings. The Best Paper Committee will review the finalist papers and select the winning paper.  

For further information: Information on the Bengaluru, India meeting venue and AIB conference is available at http://aib.msu.edu/events/2015/. For questions regarding conference papers and submissions, please contact Carol Reade (carol.reade@sjsu.edu). For questions or comments regarding AJBS or conference registration, please contact ajbs@ajbs.org or the AJBS President, Gary Knight (gknight@willamette.edu).

Despite the economic and also increasingly political role of today’s Asian economies, research on the diversity of capitalism in Asia remains underdeveloped. If at all, the literature has included Japan, but neither systematically analyzed other Asian countries nor embedded Japan into the Asian context. Asia offers a rich and challenging empirical ground to study the emergence and change of new types of institutions (e.g. lack of a coherent institutional framework in China, the contrasting speed of institutional change in Japan and Korea, the rather uncontested dominant technological ideology even after Fukushima, or the idiosyncratic industrial specialization in India based on textile, IT and service). We hence suggest enlarging the analysis on the diversity of capitalism onto Asia, and to enrich, contest or enlarge established theories and concepts of the comparative capitalism approach with empirical evidence of Asian systems.

Research has started to show an interest into the diversity of Asian capitalisms (Amable 2003; Aoki, Jackson, and Miyajima, 2007; Lechevalier, 2011, Storz and Schäfer 2011; Whitley 1992, 1999). This research sheds light on how the specific properties of Asian capitalisms may be understood in the context of established theories and concepts of capitalism and how change within these systems can be incorporated. These two topics make up the core of the special issue: diversity of institutions and institutional change. In both parts, the special issue aims to integrate and re-evaluate important approaches that helped to better understand US and European economic systems. The special issue is not looking for papers to recapitulate existing critiques of the main theoretical frameworks constituting the comparative capitalism literature (Crouch 2005; Deeg and Jackson 2007; Hermann 2008), but uses empirical cases and data from Asia as a chance to extend, revise, or develop new theories that are relevant to the broad concerns of the comparative capitalism approach. We are therefore especially interested in papers adopting a comparative perspective. In pursuit of this idea, we understand the special issue as an analytical program contributing to a theoretically informed and empirically grounded understanding of today’s economies in Asia. Hence, we have a rather “large question” in mind, so that the special issue will neither be able to cover all important countries in Asia, nor be able to develop a “final” understanding of institutional regimes, their design, and institutional change. However, we hope to contribute to an informed debate of the institutional foundations of Asian economies. The following is a list of indicative, but not exhaustive, topic areas:

• Asian capitalisms in cross-national comparison: transformation and institutional diversity of capitalisms; comparative capitalism approaches (e.g. varieties of capitalisms, national innovation systems, regulationist theory, business systems) and Asia
• Asian capitalisms and institutional change: patterns of institution building; forms of institutional change (e.g. path activation or innovative use of paths); weak and strong institutional complementarities; diversity and interaction of actors in inducing and implementing change, considering also socio-political factors
• Asian capitalisms and the organization of the firm: corporate governance, strategy and structure within the diverse institutional systems in Asia; forms and change of HRM practices, career systems, worker involvement; varieties of leadership within economic systems in Asia
•  Asian capitalisms and innovation: sectoral logics versus institutional logics; learning and knowledge creation; industrialization and de-industrialization
• Asian capitalisms, state regulation and political economy perspectives: implications of the role of the state in Asia; framing of Asian capitalisms in the context of state regulation, growth models and welfare regimes; inequalities;  capitalism and democracy
• Asian capitalisms and the international and regional division of labor: towards a new theory of the institutional comparative advantages?; new patterns of knowledge creation and innovation

Submissions
Socio-Economic Review (SER) aims to encourage work on the relationship between society, economy, institutions and markets, moral commitments and the rational pursuit of self-interest. The journal seeks articles that focus on economic action in its social and historical context. In broad disciplinary terms, papers may be drawn from sociology, political science, economics and the management and policy sciences. The journal encourages papers that seek to recombine disciplinary domains in response to practically relevant issues, while at the same time encouraging the development of new theory.

Papers should be submitted by email to Cornelia Storz (email: storz@wiwi.uni-frankfurt.de). Please prepare manuscripts according to the guidelines shown at ser.oxfordjournals.org. The maximum length of articles including references, notes and abstract is 10,000, and the minimum length is 6,000 words. Articles must be accompanied by an abstract of no more than 150 words. The main document has to be anonymous and should contain title, abstract, and strictly avoid self references. Papers will be reviewed following the journal’s normal review process and criteria. Papers accepted into the revision stage are also invited to be presented and discussed at the SASE network Q on Asian Capitalisms in 2013 (for details, see www.sase.org).

For further information for this Special Issue please contact any of the Guest Editors:
Bruno Amable: bruno.amable@univ-paris1.fr
Steven Casper: Steven_Casper@kgi.edu
Sebastien Lechevalier: sebastien.lechevalier@ehess.fr
Cornelia Storz: storz@wiwi.uni-frankfurt.de

Timeline
Full paper submissions due: June 1, 2012
Special Issue Publication: April 2013 (Issue 2)
 

Introduction
Families represent a large and growing market worldwide. The family has been identified as the most important decision making and consumption unit. Since last two decades, this domain has attracted interests of marketers and academicians. Marketers in emerging Asian economies are just beginning to experience the growing influence of families in the consumption process. The abrupt changes in lifestyle patterns, increasing per capita incomes, extensive media and major socio-cultural as well as economic changes are bringing altogether new perspectives in consumer markets in Asia. The tested marketing concepts in the west are not as effective as in the traditional Asian consumers. Marketers need to move beyond the traditional predictable techniques that worked for generations. The latest data from World Bank shows that global family consumption has been rising year on year. In 2016, India’s total household final consumption expenditure was growing at 8.7 % annually; China was growing at 7.8%, Indonesia at 5% Cambodia 6.7%, Pakistan 6.9% and the Philippines at 7%.

Objective
While family as the fundamental unit of analysis remains central to many consumption decisions, it has received relatively insufficient attention from researchers in the areas of marketing and consumer behavior, and many nuances have been overlooked. The premise of this special issue is that this lack of attention is due to a restrictive notion of the role of family in consumption decisions and that many fertile research areas can be identified.

Recommended Topics
Topics to be discussed in this special issue include (but are not limited to) the following:

• Family Buying Process
• Consumer Decision Making Dynamics in Family
• Strategic Alliances that Family Members make
• Family Life Cycles and impact on Market
• Children as an important Decision Maker
• Child Socialization and Parent’s Reverse Socialization
• Family Decisions in Tourism, Consumer durables, Gadgets, other specific industries
• Social Media and Family’s Consumer Attitudes
• New Parenthood & Changing Consumer Decision
• Other related studies

Submission Procedure
Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit papers for this special theme issue on “Asian Families and Consumer Decisions” on or before June 30, 2018. All submissions must be original and may not be under review by another publication. INTERESTED AUTHORS SHOULD CONSULT THE JOURNAL’S GUIDELINES FOR MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS at http://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/. All submitted papers will be reviewed on a double-blind, peer review basis. Papers must follow APA style for reference citations.

All submissions and inquiries should be directed to the attention of:
Dr. Monica Chaudhary monicarana@gmail.com
Dr. Suhail Mohammad Ghouse suhailmghouse@gmail.com

The year 2025 could be a year in which humanity, many eco-systems and biological species, and business sectors could hit the point of no return. This book aims to address the intersection between business, society, biodiversity and technology by the year 2025. This book seeks to analyze the challenges and transformations required to be able to have sustainable businesses with a future orientation. This volume targets contributions to provide elements on current and potential social, demographic, technological, and managerial trends; the implications of the digital revolution in society and business; as well as the challenges of surviving, being sustainable and profitable. Furthermore, we seek to provide an understanding on business reasons to incorporate a future orientation in business strategy, and to facilitate understanding of the need for profound changes in individual behavior, culture of the organizations, public policy and business environments to adapt to the accelerated changes, and to manage business with orientation to the future.

Therefore, with this book, we seek to (i) present a collection of evidence and analysis of the implications of the digital revolution in society and business, and the challenges of surviving, being sustainable and profitable; (ii) identify potential social, demographic, technological, and managerial trends by 2025; (iii) understanding of the need for profound transformations in individuals, the culture of organizations and the environment to adapt to accelerated changes, and managing organizations with a focus on the future.

Topics for this volume include, but not limited to:

  • Connection between sustainability and digital transformation.
  • After the 2030 sustainable development agenda.
  • What has been said about the future in the past. The past history of the future.
  • Industry 5.0: What does really mean the human touch revolution?
  • Challenges for humanity after 2025.
  • Challenges for business after 2025.
  • Challenges for governments after 2025.
  • Ethical challenges in the year 2025.
  • The geopolitical evolution and demographic characteristics by the second half of the 21st century.
  • The future of the world economy.
  • Models of development after the digital revolution.
  • Uncertainty and sustainability for international business. 
  • Disruptive innovations and the challenges to sustainable and inclusive development.
  • New conceptions of development.
  • The future of production and consumption.
  • Survival, sustainability and profitability.
  • Business challenges for agile and exponential organizations.
  • The challenges of inclusion: How to deal with the excluded.
  • Diversity with diversity by 2025: the new different ones.
  • Speed ​​as a competitive advantage.
  • Leadership of the future.
  • Emerging organizational forms (such as B Corporations and others).
  • Extra-planetary business.
  • Challenges on renewable energy.
  • Considerations of human development and happiness by 2025.
  • Utopian views of the future.
  • Positive impacts for humanity and business of automation and robotics
  • Positive impacts for humanity and the planet of climate change.
  • Techno-humanitarianism.
  • Opportunity-exploration paradigm.
  • More human humans: sensitivity, compassion and connection.
  • Political forces shaping the future.
  • Climate related forces shaping the future.
  • What will happen to the sustainable development goals that are not met?

Important dates:

  • Submission deadline for chapter proposals, emailed to mgonza40@eafit.edu.co by May 10th 2019
  • Notification of acceptance/rejection of chapter proposals: May 21st, 2019.
  • Deadline for full chapter: October 10th2019
  • Notification of acceptance/rejection of chapter: November 30th, 2019.
  • Deadline for submission of revised chapters: January 30th, 2020.
  • Estimated date of publication: End of first semester 2020.

Guidelines:

  • Chapter Proposals: 250-500 words
  • It should contain provisional title
  • Author(s) information (name, affiliation, contact details)
  • Summary of chapter including main idea, preliminary conclusions, and list of reference.

Peer Reviewer Commitments:

  • Each accepted author must be willing to review several rounds of peer reviewed chapters by set deadlines during the October-November timeline.

Chapter:

Up to 10,000 words.

APA 6th manuscript formatting.

  • Accepted chapters will be compiled in a book, which will be published by Palgrave Macmillan.

Book Editors:

Seung Ho "Sam" Park

Dr. Park is Professor and President’s Chair in Strategy and International Business and Executive Director of the Center for Emerging Market Studies at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. He was the Parkland Chair Professor of strategy and Director of the Center for Emerging Market Studies at CEIBS and the founding president of the Skolkovo-EY Institute for Emerging Market Studies and the Samsung Economic Research Institute China.

Maria Alejandra Gonzalez-Perez

Dr. Gonzalez-Perez (PhD, MBS, Psy) is Full Professor of Management at Universidad EAFIT (Colombia). She is the Chapter Chair for Latin America and the Caribbean at the Academy of International Business (AIB) (2018-2021). She is Member of the global council of the Sustainable Development Goal  number 1 (SDG 1: End Poverty) of the World Government Summit (WGS). Furthermore, Alejandra is a Research Partner at the Center for Emerging Market Studies at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. 

Dinorà Floriani

Dinorá Eliete Floriani is the Director for Professional master’s in science (MsC) in Management and International Business, and coordinates the Master of Business Administration (MBA).  Dinorá is Full Professor of Internationalization Strategy at University of Vale do Itajaí (UNIVALI)–Brazil. Visiting Professor at University of Florence in Italy and Halmstad University in Sweden.  She has been served as Board Member of the Academy of International Business – Latin America and Caribbean Chapter 2018-2021 (AIB-LAT). 

Corresponding editor:

INTRODUCTION TO THE THEME:

Multinational entreprises (MNEs) experienced ‘golden days’ during the 1990s and 2000s, they expanded globally and were major players in globalization. Today they have become powerful actors in the global economy. CEOs of international businesses are welcomed by heads of state as their counterparts, they are invited by governments to help solve global issues such as climate change and poverty, and they are facing dilemmas comparable to those of other international actors.

However, MNEs are facing global legitimacy challenges. They are suspected of tax avoidance, using low wage countries for corporate benefits only, disrespecting privacy regulations, abusing consumer data, violating local community rights, exploiting natural resources, ignoring basic human rights, and employing too many lobbyists targeting national and international political decision-making processes for their own corporate interests.

Although many of these challenges are not new, they have resurfaced and become more apparent during the past couple of years, partly due to the economic recession that many developed economies have faced and to the broader awareness of increasing global inequality and the importance of sustainability.

BUSINESS DIPLOMACY

Business diplomacy seems to be more relevant than ever to deal with these challenges. Business diplomacy involves developing strategies for long-term, positive relationship building with governments, local communities, and interest groups, aiming to establish and sustain legitimacy and to mitigate the risks arising from all non-commercial or exogenous factors in the global business environment.

Business diplomacy is different from lobbying or strategic political activity; it implies an (strategic / holistic) approach of an international business to look at itself as an actor in the international diplomatic arena. Representation, communication and negotiation are key in such an approach.

One of the consequences is that MNEs are able to operate in and show respect for an international business environment that consists of multiple stakeholders. This demands a strategic perspective and vision on the sector and the business environments in which the company wants to operate, and requires a specific set of instruments, skills and competences.

Doing business internationally means facing a complex international business environment; global companies, large, medium or small, need to manage and ‘survive’ in a rapidly changing political and economic business environment that requires them to interact with multiple stakeholders such as host governments and NGOs. To operate successfully among all these complexities, international business will need to develop business diplomacy competences and knowhow more than before.

Yet not many international companies recognize the importance of business diplomacy. Instead of training their managers in business diplomacy, most multinational corporations (MNCs) hire political diplomats and rely on their experience in managing complex relationships with host governments. MNCs need to anticipate stakeholder conflicts, communicate with non-business pressure and interest associations, influence host-government decision-making and maintain constructive relations with external constituencies. Therefore, they cannot rely on advisors only, but should develop their own business diplomacy competences.

It is argued that by engaging in business diplomacy, corporations can increase their power and legitimacy. Firms that are involved in business diplomacy have chosen to satisfy a social public demand rather than only a market demand. Scholars emphasize that it is important for modern corporations to respond to the expectations of various stakeholders in order to obtain a “license to operate”, and therefore the importance of enacting business diplomacy in today’s business environment is stressed.

In the international management literature the term business diplomacy is not widely recognized and has received (too) little scholarly attention.

AIM OF THE BOOK

This book aims at shaping the debate on business diplomacy in multinational corporations (MNCs). It will deal with questions such as:

What exactly is business diplomacy?

How is business diplomacy in MNCs related to (political) corporate diplomacy?

To what extent do MNCs engage in business diplomacy and how?

How can business diplomacy help to deal with the global legitimacy challenges that MNCs face?

What strategies, tactics and instruments in enacting business diplomacy?

Which existing theories can be applied to understand the international business-as-an-diplomatic actor perspective?

New theory development to understand business diplomacy, and what are directions for research on business diplomacy?

Specific topics that chapters can address:

International Business and global legitimacy challenges

International Business, Business diplomacy and the OECD guidelines

International Business, Business diplomacy and mitigating risks

International Business, Business diplomacy and sustainable development

International Business, Business diplomacy and the impact and potential of digitalization

International Business, Business diplomacy and fragile states

International Business as international political actors

MNEs, business diplomacy and tax avoidance schemes

International Business, business diplomacy and ethical dilemmas

EDITOR: Huub Ruël, Phd – Professor of International Business – Windesheim University of Applied Sciences (The Netherlands).

EDITORIAL TEAM: Raymond Saner (CSEND, Diplomacydialogue, University of Basl, Science Po (Paris)), Jan Melissen (Netherlands Institute for International Relations Clingendael, University of Antwerp), Shaun Riordan (Netherlands Institute for International Relations Clingendael), Donna Lee (University of Bradford), Doudou Sidibe (Novancia Business School, Paris), Jennifer Kestelyn (Ghent University).

SUBMISSIONS:

Submissions to this new book in the Emerald Advanced Series in Management are welcomed.

Submission deadline of draft chapters/extended chapter proposals: November 15th 2015

Acceptance notification: December 15th 2015

Full chapter submission: January 31th 2016

Authors must follow the author guidelines of the Emerald Advanced Series in Management.

Send submissions to: hjm.ruel@windesheim.nl or h.j.m.ruel@utwente.nl

Business groups are prevalent in both developed and emerging markets (Ghemawat & Khanna, 1998) and constitute the dominant organizational form in many emerging markets (Chung & Luo, 2008; Khanna & Rivkin, 2001). Scholars have utilized multiple theoretical perspectives, including institutional economics, sociology and resource-based view to define, characterize and comprehend business groups. Business groups play an important role in emerging markets by filling institutional voids and creating their own internal capital, labor and product markets (Khanna & Palepu, 2000a). There are important differences between group affiliated and unaffiliated firms in emerging economies, in terms of their underlying resource base and embeddedness in the institutional and social fabric of the local market. To add to this complexity, institutional environments in emerging economies are constantly evolving and thereby impacting strategy, particularly of organizations such as business groups that are highly embedded in the domestic context (Hoskisson, Eden, Lau, & Wright, 2000; Hoskisson, Wright, Filatotchev, & Peng, 2013). Internationalization of business group firms under such tumultuous conditions presents a rich context for advancing internationalization theory and, in particular, contributing to a better understanding of the strategic adaptation of emerging market firms.

The extant literature on business group has primarily focused on how groups as a whole and/or firms affiliated to groups perform in their home countries (e.g. Chacar & Vissa, 2005; Chang, Chung, & Mahmood, 2006; Douma, George, & Kabir, 2006; Khanna & Palepu, 2000a; 2000b; Khanna & Rivkin, 2001). There are only a few studies that have explored the impact that affiliation to a business group has on the degree of internationalization of the focal firm, and present inconclusive findings (e.g. Chang, 1995; Kim, Kim, & Hoskisson, 2010). Examining not only institutional differences but also factor market difference between home and host countries also seems to matter with regard to internationalization from emerging economies (Kim, Hoskisson, & Lee, 2014). In the wake of the recent widespread and accelerated internationalization of emerging market firms, including many that are affiliated to larger business groups, the internationalization of business group affiliated firms warrants a deeper and systematic investigation from a variety of theoretical and empirical approaches.

As emerging economies develop and become mid-range economies (Hoskisson, et al., 2013), how does this change the nature of business groups and their internationalization strategies. Do they restructure their portfolios as transaction cost theory would imply (Hoskisson, Johnson, Tihanyi, & White, 2005)? Do they substitute domestic product diversification for more internationalization (Meyer, 2006)? How are they structured and governed differently (Chittoor, Kale, Puranam, 2014) as the country settings change and as they pursue increased innovation and internationalization (Yiu, Hoskisson, Bruton, Lu, 2014)? How does government ownership influence their corporate and internationalization strategies (White, Hoskisson, Yiu, & Bruton, 2008)?

Many studies simply use dummies to distinguish group affiliates from independent firms. This approach assumes all affiliates benefit equally, which is questionable due to differences in value capture.  For example, research shows that affiliate firms differ in their ability to capture benefits from internationalization; in this study more powerful group firms benefit from internationalization compared to less powerful affiliates (Wan, Hoskisson, & Kim, 2004). However, we have limited understanding of differences in power and of value capture among affiliates because few scholars examine heterogeneity among group affiliates.

The special issue solicits scholarly contributions that provide a finer-grained analysis of the internationalization of business group affiliated firms from emerging markets, encapsulating the unique attributes of business groups as well as that of the institutional and cultural contexts where they prosper. The following is an illustrative list of questions:

  1. How is the efficacy of business groups affected due to the rapidly changing institutional environment in EEs?
  2. Business groups are social structures deeply embedded in the broader institutional environment of EEs. How does this embeddnesses affect the internationalization propensity of their affiliates?
  3. What are the similarities and differences between business groups from different emerging economies as well as developed economies and how do these similarities/differences affect their internationalization behavior?
  4. How are business groups organized and managed differently in different country institutional and factor market settings? What organizational transformation are business groups undergoing to respond to the changes in the external institutional environment?
  5. What are the unique resources and capabilities of business groups? How do these capabilities help group affiliated firms in internationalization?
  6. Are the advantages and/or disadvantages of affiliation to business group context-dependent?  How do individual business affiliate firms benefit more or less from group affiliation?
  7. Do advantages and/or disadvantages transfer to foreign markets when EE firms internationalize their operations?
  8. How do business groups extend their group like structure in foreign markets?
  9. How does the presence of a business group in an industry affect the industry-wide innovation and internationalization?
  10. How do the foreign market entry modes different between group affiliated and unaffiliated firms?

We encourage potential contributors to examine the internationalization of business groups from different theoretical perspectives and empirical approaches, including multi-level models and case studies.  Authors should not merely be testing the existing theories in the context of business groups, but make use of the novel context to develop new theories and explanations, and thereby enrich our understanding of firm internationalization behavior in general, and of business group internationalization behavior in particular.

Submission Process:

By March 1, 2015 all manuscripts should be submitted using the online submission system.  The link for submitting manuscript is: http://ees.elsevier.com/jwb.

To ensure that all manuscripts are correctly identified for consideration for this Special Issue, it is important that authors select 'SI: Business Groups' when they reach the "Article Type" step in the submission process.

We may organize a workshop designed to facilitate the development of papers.

Authors of manuscripts that have progressed through the revision process will be invited to it. Presentation at the workshop is neither a requirement for nor a promise of final acceptance of the paper in the Special Issue.

Questions about the special issue may be directed to any of the following guest editors:

Ajai Gaur, Rutgers University, USA ajai@business.rutgers.edu

Jane Lu, University of Melbourne, Australia jane.lu@unimelb.edu.au

Vikas Kumar, University of Sydney, Australia vikas.kumar@sydney.edu.au

Robert E. Hoskisson, Rice University robert.hoskisson@rice.edu

References

Chacar, A., & Vissa, B. (2005). Are emerging economies less efficient? Performance persistence and the impact of business group affiliation. Strategic Management Journal, 26(10): 933-946.

Chang, S.J. (1995). International expansion strategy of Japanese firms: capability building through sequential entry.  Academy of Management Journal, 38(2): 383-407.

Chang, S., Chung, C., & Mahmood, I.P. (2006). When and how does business group affiliation promote firm innovation? A tale of two emerging economies. Organization Science, 17(5): 637-656.

Chittoor, R., Kale, P., & Puranam, P. (2014). Business groups in developing capital markets:  Towards a complementarity perspective.  Strategic Management Journal, forthcoming.

Chung, C., & Luo, X. (2008). Human agents, contexts, and institutional change: the decline of family in the leadership of business groups. Organization Science, 19(1): 124-142.

Douma, S., George, R., & Kabir, R. (2006). Foreign and domestic ownership, business groups, and firm performance: evidence from a large emerging market. Strategic Management Journal, 27(7): 637-657.

Ghemawat, P., & Khanna, T. (1998). The nature of diversified business groups: a research design and two case studies.  Journal of Industrial Economics, 46(1): 35-61.

Hoskisson, R.E., Eden, L., Lau, C.-M., & Wright, M. 2000. Strategy in emerging economies. Academy of Management Journal, 43: 249-267.

Hoskisson, R. E., Johnson, R. A., Tihanyi, L. & White, R. E. (2005). Diversified business groups and corporate refocusing in emerging economies. Journal of Management, 31: 941-965.

Hoskisson, R.E., Wright, M., Filatotchev, I., Peng, M. (2013). Emerging multinationals from mid-range economies: The influence of institutions and factor markets. Journal of Management Studies, 50(7): 1295-1321.

Khanna, T., & Palepu, K. (2000a). Is group affiliation profitable in emerging markets? An analysis of diversified Indian business groups. Journal of Finance, 55(2): 867-891.

Khanna, T., & Palepu, K. (2000b). The future of business groups in emerging markets: long-run evidence from Chile. Academy of Management Journal, 43(3): 268-285.

Khanna, T., & Rivkin, J.W. (2001). Estimating the performance effects of business groups in emerging markets. Strategic Management Journal, 22(1): 45-74.

Kim, H., Hoskisson, R.E., & Lee, S.-H. (2014). Why strategic factor markets matter: 'New' multinationals' geographic diversification and firm profitability. Strategic Management Journal, Forthcoming.

Kim, H., Kim, H., & Hoskisson, R.E. (2010). Does market-oriented institutional change in an emerging economy make business-group-affiliated multinationals perform better? An institution based view. Journal of International Business Studies, 41: 1141-1160.

Meyer, K.E. (2006). Globalfocusing: From domestic conglomerate to global specialist. Journal of Management Studies, 43(5): 1109-1144.

Kim, H., Hoskisson, R. E. & Wan, W. P. 2004. Power dependence, diversification strategy and performance in keiretsu member firms, Strategic Management Journal, 25: 613-636.

White, R. E., Hoskisson, R. E., Yiu, D. & Bruton, G. (2008). Employment and market innovation in Chinese business group-affiliated firms: The role of group control systems, Management and Organization Review, 4: 225-256.

Yiu, D. Hoskisson, R. E., Bruton, G. & Lu, Y. (2014). Dueling institutional logics and the effect on strategic entrepreneurship in Chinese business groups. Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, 8(3): 195-213.

During the past three decades, the world has witnessed China’s rise from an underdeveloped country to the third largest economic power. Business leaders have taken a crucial role in developing the firms during this period, which constitutes the most powerful driving force for the rapid growth of the Chinese economy. While business leaders have made significant contributions to China’s economic and societal development via their unprecedented achievements, scholars have not systematically examined their leadership practices and, thus, have not developed rigorous theories to explain these practices. Among the vast amounts of literature on leadership, very few are on business leadership in the Chinese context. Researchers, educators, and practitioners are all aware that the Western-based leadership theories are not completely sufficient to understand the rich and unique leadership phenomenon in the Chinese context. To fully understand the miracle of the Chinese economy, it is essential to identify the unique issues in business leadership in the Chinese context.

The purpose of this special issue is to examine leadership in organizations at different levels, in different domains, or from different perspectives aimed at offering valuable insights into the organizational leadership phenomenon in Greater China. We intend to advance leadership research in the Chinese context, to improve leadership practices, and to add novel knowledge to global leadership literature.

China’s distinctive political, social and cultural environments have been regarded as the major factors breeding the leadership styles in Chinese business organizations. In addition, the unique characteristics of Chinese firms, which have been evolving in a transitional era, also play a major role in shaping the special leadership patterns in Chinese organizations. In the early state, leaders had to make arduous efforts to build legitimacy and to protect themselves in various ways such as registering a private firm as a collective one or getting a ‘red hat’ by registering a firm as a subsidiary or supplemental unit of a State-Owned Enterprise. Some business leaders skillfully adapted themselves to the changing environments and led their companies successfully.

Starting from the late 1990s and, in particular, after China became a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the Chinese government has opened its market to the outside world in almost all business sectors. In the domestic market, Chinese firms have to fiercely compete with strong foreign companies, many of which are multinational giants. Pessimists predicted that Chinese firms were not ready and would be overwhelmed by their international counterparts. However, many Chinese firms have not only survived, but also gained advantages in competing with foreign firms. Some Chinese firms have not only dominated the domestic market, but also started to share the international markets with multinational companies. While we can attribute the success of Chinese firms to different factors, we have no doubt that business leadership plays a crucial role in achieving such performance.

In this special issue, we seek manuscripts investigating leadership practices in Greater China and offering theories to understand these practices, which may present conceptualizations or/and findings that differ from, if not challenge, Western-imported theories. We expect this special issue to enrich our understanding of business leadership in the dynamic Chinese context by producing meaningful and valid knowledge. We highlight a Chinese perspective in examining business leadership in China. Broadly, any study that incorporates the Chinese context and offers conceptual and theoretical explanations on business leadership in the Chinese context is welcome. We invite submissions that either modify or extend the well-accepted leadership theories or develop innovative theories based on grounded/inductive approaches. We invite submissions that conduct rigorous research using either qualitative (case study, interview, grounded theory, or ethnographic methods, etc.) or quantitative approaches (survey, laboratory experiment, analyzing archival data, etc.). Purely conceptual papers are also welcome. You are encouraged to identify and choose meaningful and important problems based on your keen observation, your in-depth knowledge, or your astute analysis of business leadership and related phenomena in the Chinese context.

Submissions could address, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • The evolving pattern of leadership in Chinese business organizations;
  • Business leadership in the transitional era in China;
  • The characteristics of Chinese business leadership;
  • Indigenous models of Chinese business leadership and their functioning mechanisms;
  • Cultural and social antecedents of leadership;
  • Economic and social consequences of Chinese business leadership;
  • Implicit theories of Chinese leadership;
  • Leader-member exchange (LMX) in Chinese societies;
  • Business leadership and team dynamics;
  • The nature of transformational leadership in Chinese organizations;
  • Newly emerging leadership styles (e.g., authentic leadership, servant leadership, and ethical leadership, etc.) in the Chinese context;
  • Multiple intelligences (e.g., emotional intelligence, cultural intelligence) and business leadership in Chinese societies
  • Cross-cultural and comparative studies of business leadership
  • The similarity and diversity of business leadership in different Chinese societies (including mainland China, Taiwan, Singapore, and Hong Kong )
  • Cross-level business leadership.

Developing countries and emerging markets have one of the fastest growth rates due to the advancement in technology, rise in global investments, and changes in consumer culture. Therefore, the knowledge translations and technology transfers from advanced countries to emerging markets and vice-versa are of essence. The advanced countries need access to the markets of emerging markets, and the emerging markets need the technology and investments, among others, from advanced countries. It is a win-win situation. In this context, the Academy of Business and Emerging Markets (ABEM) Conference in association with World Scientific Publisher invites book chapters that are based on thought-provoking topics yet theoretically sound and empirically testable. Controversial or debatable topics in the context of Business, Government and Community in emerging markets are particularly invited for the edited book entitled Business Practices, Growth and Economic Policies in Emerging Markets. Case studies are not suitable for this book.

Publication Schedule

Chapters due: Sept 30, 2019

Reviewers’ comments: Dec 30, 2019

Revised chapters due: Mar 30, 2020

Camera-ready copy: June 30, 2020

Submissions

Initial submissions should be sent in Word document using Times New Roman Font Size 12, 1″ margin and double-spaced, and must include: (1) Cover page with title of the study, five keywords, author name(s), title, affiliation, full address, contact no and e-mail; and, (2) First page with the title, an abstract between 150-200 words, followed by body of the paper between 5,000 and 6,000 words including Tables (3 max), Figures (2 max) and References (APA style). No appendices. Please avoid footnotes.

Submissions should be sent to Dr. Luis Camacho (luis.camacho@esc.edu) and Dr. Satyendra Singh (s.singh@uwinnipeg.ca)

You may forward any inquiries to Dr. Luis Camacho (luis.camacho@esc.edu )

This special issue of Business and Society aims to contribute to the development of theoretical and empirical insights on the role of business in African countries, in the context of the important environmental, social and governance challenges faced by the Continent. The need for knowledge to help further sustainable development, in an equitable and accountable way, makes a better understanding of business in Africa particularly urgent, especially considering the relative lack of research published on these themes in management and organization journals. To address the specific situation in African countries, existing theories and frameworks may need to be extended, adjusted or replaced by approaches that could have implications beyond the continent. Conversely, current paradigms may be directly applicable to the African context as such, but data limitations may require methodological adaptations.

While environmental and social issues exist across the globe, leading to a thriving literature on a range of topics, Africa seems to accumulate both major environmental problems and social problems. Environmental problems include, among others, the effects of global warming and climate variability, pollution, the loss of biodiversity, deforestation and desertification, which affect the availability of land and food. Compounding environmental issues, social problems are also prevalent throughout the African continent. The World Bank’s ranked 26 African countries among the 30 poorest countries in the world in GDP (PPP) in 2009 and the UN’s Economic Commission for Africa shows at best mixed results in the progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals by 2015, sharply contrasting with other continents, such as Asia or Latin America. Poverty, human rights violations, health problems and lack of social security are coupled with often weak governance, corruption and conflict. While the number of wars across the continent has decreased since the 1990s, some countries still face conflict or continue to show worrying signs of political instability. At the same time, African countries exhibit strong and resilient economic growth in spite of the global economic crisis, with a continent-wide forecasted growth of 5.3% for 2011, according to the International Monetary Fund, and huge potential and promising economic developments have been noted.

Yet, in spite of the scale and importance of the environmental and social issues in Africa, and in spite of the sustained economic growth that the continent has experienced for a decade, very few published papers in mainstream management journals use African data. A literature search for published papers on Africa in leading management journals yielded a total of twenty-seven published papers, of which only seven were published in the last decade. Among African countries, South Africa in particular, and to a lesser extent Nigeria, receives attention. This same pattern is found for more specific outlets on corporate social responsibility, sustainability and business ethics, in which South Africa is also a main focus, followed by Nigeria (Kolk & Lenfant, 2010; Visser, 2006). In international business and management, overview articles on the “state of the art” in corporate (social) responsibility and sustainable development showed a serious lack of attention for Africa as well (Egri & Ralston, 2008; Kolk & Van Tulder, 2010). Egri and Ralston (2008, p. 325) noted that “it is particularly troubling that there has been relatively little on-the-ground corporate responsibility research in countries where the need for corporate responsibility is most pressing due to greater poverty, environmental degradation, and institutional governance issues”. Remarkably, even in research on the base/bottom of the pyramid most of the cases and examples stem from India and other emerging economies, leaving the African relatively understudied, as shown in a recent article on a decade of BOP article (Kolk, Rivera-Santos, & Rufín, forthcoming).

We believe that this dearth of studies uncovers two distinct issues. First, while emerging countries such as China or India have recently become relatively common empirical settings in management studies, Africa may simply not always be on the radar as a place to conduct research. Second, conducting research in Africa creates specific challenges, which stem directly from the social, environmental and governance problems mentioned above, coupled with complexities related to linguistic, security, cultural and/or political issues. This particularly affects the possibility to collect empirical data in the absence of large-scale databases. While scholars start to better recognize the implications of conducting research in nontraditional contexts (Kriauciunas et al., 2011), the challenges associated with data collection in contexts characterized by high levels of poverty, conflict and poor governance may seem daunting to many researchers.

With a goal of putting Africa on the scholarly map, this special issue aims to publish papers on business, society and environment in the African context. We welcome innovative papers, both conceptual and empirical, both qualitative and quantitative, with a focus on or data from the African continent. The possible topic list covers the whole range of environmental, social and governance issues mentioned above. The special issue is open to papers from different theoretical backgrounds and academic disciplines as long as it relates to the business and society domain in line with the overall focus of the journal.

Submission guidelines

All paper submissions should conform to Business & Society’s standard guidelines for authors, details of which can be found at the B&S website: http://bas.sagepub.com

Questions about the special issue can be directed at the guest editors via e-mail:

akolk@uva.nl (Ans Kolk) or mrivera@babson.edu (Miguel Rivera-Santos)

Deadline: Manuscripts must be received by 1 December 2013, and should be sent to mrivera@babson.edu.

References

Egri, C. P., & Ralston, D. A. (2008). Corporate responsibility: A review of international management research from 1998 to 2007. Journal of International Management, 14, 319-339.

Kolk, A., & Lenfant, F. (2010). MNC reporting on CSR and conflict in Central Africa. Journal of Business Ethics, 93, 241-255.

Kolk, A., Rivera-Santos, M., & C. Rufín (Forthcoming). Reviewing a decade of research on the “Base/Bottom of the Pyramid” concept. Business & Society.

Kolk, A., & Van Tulder, R. (2010). International business, corporate social responsibility and sustainable development. International Business Review, 19(2), 119-125.

Kriauciunas, A., Parmigiani, A., & Rivera-Santos, M. (2011). Leaving our comfort zone: Integrating established practices with unique adaptations to conduct survey-based strategy research in non-traditional contexts. Strategic Management Journal, 32, 994-1010.

Visser, W. (2006). Research on corporate citizenship in Africa: A ten-year review (1995-2005). In W. Visser, M. McIntosh and C. Middleton (Eds.), Corporate citizenship in Africa: Lessons from the past; paths to the future. Sheffield: Greenleaf Publishing.

Introduction: Increasing importance of India in the global economy

India, considered to be an emerging market, is also a prominent BRIC country (Brazil, Russia, India and China), and fast becoming the hub of global economy today. Matloff (2004) cites a Gartner study according to which, 25 percent of all U.S. IT jobs will be offshored by 2010, from 5 percent today. It is likely that most of these offshored jobs will land up in India. Some industry pundits predict that like the Japanese ziabatsu, and the South Korean chaebols, India too may have its share of successful giants that accelerate her economic growth. Sheth and Sisodia (2006) in their path-breaking book, Tectonic Shift: The Geoeconomic Realignment of Globalizing Markets foresee the world to get fragmented into three main regional trading blocks: the European/African bloc, the Asian Bloc with China and Japan as its center, and the US/North American bloc with US and India as allies.

Learning from innovative Indian business-to-business market management practices

In such a business environment, new and innovative business marketing practices are required. One of the most successful examples of innovative business marketing practices is that of India’s largest private sector steel manufacturer, Tata Steel, which was the first company to go for intermediate branding, and a co-branding with its suppliers. Tata Steel, using such innovative marketing processes, has decommoditized steel in India. Similarly, Tata Steel’s joint venture with India’s largest public sector steel giant, Steel authority of India (SAIL) has launched an e-sourcing initiative called www.metaljunction.com which is the largest B2B e-commerce platform in India. This joint venture also started an e-selling initiative that facilitated dis-intermediation, collecting statutory sales tax documents and receivables from buyers, and on its way to become a full-fledged KPO outfit, providing complete order generation and fulfillment services for the sales chain.

The promise of the India-focused special issue of JBIM

New B2B marketing practices should engender new B2B marketing theories, which while originating from Indian practice and context, are expected to have wider applicability and relevance. Most B2B Marketing literature presents theories and models that are grounded in B2B marketing practices in developed countries, which are characterized by mature markets. Very little research has been carried out on the issues and challenges facing B2B marketers in different sectors in India. Many sectors are growing rapidly, taking up important positions in the global context as well.
This special India-focused issue of JBIM seeks to focus on intriguing practices and resulting theory relating to the B2B Marketing and Sales in some of the key industries in India.

Indicative coverage of the India-focused special issue of JBIM

Contributions to this special issue should fulfill one or more of the following conditions:

* Papers could be from both academics and practitioners in B2B Marketing & Sales
* Papers that take an interdisciplinary perspective in understanding B2B Marketing & Sales in India
* Papers presenting new theories or research about B2B Marketing and Sales practice in the Indian context
* Papers covering any type of research paradigm including case studies, qualitative and quantitative analysis, conceptual and empirical research
* Papers presenting rigorously validated qualitative studies that build new theories or provide a “really fresh perspective” in B2B Marketing and Sales that are relevant for India
* Papers presenting case studies of not so celebrated firms in India, that showcase innovative Marketing & Sales practices

Papers that will not be appropriate for the special issue are:

* Papers that are mere replication studies and/or based on validating extant theories in the Indian context.
* Teaching cases.

Indicative list of topics for developing the papers

An indicative, though not exhaustive, list of suggested topics that would be suitable for this special issue would include:

* Understanding and managing value in the B2B context in India
* Managing Buyer-Seller relationships in the Indian market
* Driving efficiency and effectiveness in B2B selling processes in India
* Customer-centricity in B2B marketing processes in India
* Role of buying centers in Indian B2B firms
* Intermediate branding in India
* Pricing Issues in B2B buyer-seller relationships
* Role of supply-chain and logistics in B2B marketing in India
* Outsourcing/offshoring to India
* Co-creation of value with B2B customers in India
* Innovation and new product development for B2B customers in India
* Segmentation practices in Indian B2B markets
* Sales-Marketing interface issues in industrial firms
* Market orientation of B2B firms in India
* Ethics in B2B marketing and sales
* Green marketing of B2B products and services
* Influence of culture on B2B marketing
* Tendering and purchasing processes in India
* Online B2B marketing practices and innovations

Additional dimensions that the paper should address

All contributions should have the following sections, in addition to the specific
content of the paper:

1. A section highlighting managerial implications, based on results from the application of the theories being presented.

2. For the key ideas presented, a section explaining the relevance/applicability to a broader audience of practitioners/academics in other parts of the world.

Process for the submission of papers:

Papers submitted must not have been published, accepted for publication, or presently be under consideration for publication with any other journal. Submissions should be approximately 6,000-8,000 words in length. Submissions to the Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing must be made using the Scholar One Manuscript Central system. For more details, please visit www.emeraldinsight.com/jbim.htm and consult the author guidelines.

A separate title page must be uploaded containing the title, author/s, and contact information for the author(s). Suitable articles will be subjected to a double-blind review. Hence authors should not identify themselves in the body of the paper.

Deadlines for various stages of processing the papers are:

Submission of first draft of paper: 31 December 2009.
First review results: 31 March 2010.
Submission of revised manuscripts (as applicable): 31 May 2010.
Second review results (as applicable): 31 July 2010.
Submission of accepted manuscripts in final form: 31 August 2010.
Special issue expected: late 2010 or early 2011.

Please address all communication to the special issue Guest Editors:

D.V.R. Seshadri, Visiting Faculty – Marketing Area, Indian Institute of Management
Bangalore, Bannerghatta Road, Bangalore 560076, India
E-mail: dvrs@iimb.ernet.in

Or

Ramendra Singh, Doctoral Candidate (Marketing), Indian Institute of Management
Ahmedabad, IIM Ahmedabad, Vastrapur, Ahmedabad 380015, India
E-mail: ramendras@iimahd.ernet.in

References

Matloff, N. (2004), “Globalization and the American IT Worker,” Communications of the ACM, 47(11), 27-29.

Sheth, Jagdish N., and Rajendra S.Sisodia (2006), Tectonic Shift: The Geoeconomic Realignment of Globalizing Markets, Response Books; Sage Publications, New Delhi.

Anthem Business & Management is a new series from Anthem Press that will publish
research monographs, reference books and upper-level textbooks for professionals, academics and students in these fields. Volumes in the series will be written by subject experts and may cover developments in all areas of business and management practices.

The series will also include authoritative, timely and accurate information on critical
developments in the world’s capital markets in areas such as hedge funds, regulation
and strategy, and practitioners’ guides in the financial services industry. We welcome
the opportunity to pursue co-publishing ventures with institutions and organizations
connected engaged with all areas of business, management and finance.

We welcome submissions of proposals that meet the criteria of this series. Should you
wish to send in a proposal for a research monograph, reference books upper-level textbook or handbook please contact us at: proposal@wpcpress.com. We also welcomeapplications for membership of our editorial board in this series, which should be addressed to the series editor.

Anthem Press is a distinguished independent international publishing house pioneering a
distinctive approach to the publishing of serious works across a wide range of subjects that appeal to academics, area specialists, students and researchers, professionals as well as to general readers.

Please send proposals to Kim Cahill, Managing Editor (kimberly.cahill@villanova.edu)

The Journal of World Business has a long tradition of publishing high impact special issues on emerging or provocative topics within the editorial purview of the journal. The objective of these special issues is to assemble a coherent set of articles that move understanding of a topic forward empirically and theoretically. Therefore, as a rule, Journal of World Business (JWB) will not publish special issues based solely on conferences. Rather, special issues must be motivated by a clear and compelling focus on an issue that is timely, significant and likely to generate interest among the readership of JWB.

PROCESS

Prospective guest editor(s) should submit written proposals that incorporate the rationale for the special issue topic, positions it in the literature, and include some illustrative topics that papers could focus upon. Prospective guest editor(s) should consult JWB's Aims and Scope to ensure the proposal fits within the journal's remit. The proposal should also include a draft of the actual call for papers and outline the credentials of the guest editor(s).

http://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-world-business/

After the closing date, the JWB editorial team will review the proposals submitted and select one to three for further assessment. This additional analysis may include communication with prospective guest editors, suggestions as to how to strengthen the proposal and/or recommendations for the addition of other guest editors. Following this consultation, one proposal will generally be selected by the Editor in Chief to progress, although the guest editor(s) may still be asked to develop and refine the proposal further. The Editor-in-Chief will generally assign a JWB Senior Editor to serve on the SI editorial team as the Supervising Editor. The Supervising Editor will be responsible for acting as a liaison between the JWB editorial team and the guest editor(s) and ensuring that JWB editorial standards are maintained through the special issue process. She/he will be actively involved in the entire editorial process, including helping to select which papers are sent for review, identifying and assigning reviewers and in preliminary decisions throughout the review process. However, the ultimate decision to accept or reject papers rests with the Editor in Chief.

GUEST EDITOR(S)’ ROLE

The guest editor(s) will be responsible for publicizing the call for papers and for generating submissions for the special issue. If appropriate, they may host a workshop for papers being considered for the special issue but attendance at the workshop cannot be a prerequisite for the acceptance of papers. They will also be actively involved in all stages of the review process in terms of inviting reviewers and making preliminary decisions on submissions. The review process will be managed online through the EES system. It is also expected that the guest editors will write an introductory article that will position the special issue in the relevant literature and briefly introduce the papers in the issue. This article will be subject to editorial review. In order to prevent any perception of conflicts of interest, it is JWB policy that guest editors cannot submit to the special issue as authors of papers beyond the introductory article.

The Journal of World Business (JWB) invites proposals for special issues with a due date of July 15, 2015.

JWB has a long tradition of publishing high impact special issues on emerging or provocative topics within the editorial purview of the journal. The objective of these special issues is to assemble a coherent set of papers that move understanding of a topic forward empirically and theoretically. Therefore, as a rule, JWB will not publish special issues based solely on papers presented at conferences or workshops. Rather, special issues must be motivated by a clear and compelling focus on an issue that is timely, significant and likely to generate interest among JWB's readership.

PROCESS

Prospective guest editor(s) should submit written proposals that incorporate the rationale for the special issue topic, positions it in the literature, and include some illustrative topics that papers could focus upon. The proposal should also include a draft of the actual call for papers and outline the credentials of the guest editor(s).

After the closing date, the JWB editorial team will review the proposals submitted and select one to three for further assessment. This additional analysis may include communication with prospective guest editors, suggestions as to how to strengthen the proposal and/or recommendations for the addition of other guest editors. Following this consultation, one proposal will generally be selected by the Editor in Chief to progress, although the guest editor(s) may still be asked to develop and refine the proposal further. The Editor-in-Chief will generally assign a JWB Senior Editor to serve on the SI editorial team as the Supervising Editor. The Supervising Editor will be responsible for acting as a liaison between the JWB editorial team and the guest editor(s) and ensuring that JWB editorial standards are maintained through the special issue process. She/he will be actively involved in the entire editorial process, including helping to select which papers are sent for review, identifying and assigning reviewers and in preliminary decisions throughout the review process. However, the ultimate decision to accept or reject papers rests with the Editor in Chief.

GUEST EDITOR(S)’ ROLE

The guest editor(s) will be responsible for publicizing the call for papers and for generating submissions for the special issue. If appropriate, they may host a workshop for papers being considered for the special issue but attendance at the workshop cannot be a prerequisite for the acceptance of papers. They will also be actively involved in all stages of the review process in terms of inviting reviewers and making preliminary decisions on submissions. The review process will be managed online through the EES system. It is also expected that the guest editors will write an introductory article that will position the special issue in the relevant literature and briefly introduce the papers in the issue. This paper will be subject to editorial review. In order to prevent any perception of conflicts of interest, it is JWB policy that Guest Editors cannot submit to the special issue as authors of papers beyond the introductory article.

Please send proposals to : Kim Cahill, Managing Editor (kimberly.cahill@villanova.edu)

The Editorial Board of the Elite Hall Publishing House is calling for papers to be considered for publication in the upcoming issues of the three journals:

  1. International Journal of Information, Business and Management (IJIBM)
  2. International Journal of Advanced Engineering and Science (IJAES)
  3. International Journal of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Research (JMIER)

We welcome papers and articles of analytic or empirical merit (up to 20 pages in length) in English. All our submitted papers are treated in an anonymous way between author(s) and referees (double blind) and articles are evaluated anonymously by two reviewers. We highly encourage doctoral students to submit excerpts of their dissertations or working papers relevant to entrepreneurship research for consideration. We don't charge any publication fee. So, it is free to publish your papers in the International Journal of Information, Business and Management (IJIBM), International Journal of Advanced Engineering and Science (IJAES) and International Journal of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Research (JMIER).

For more information, visit the official website of the journals: http://elitehall.elitehall.com/ With thanks, Josephine Roy Publishing Manager, Elite Hall Publishing House, Taiwan International Journal of Information, Business and Management http://ijibm.elitehall.com/ International Journal of Advanced Engineering and Science http://ijaes.elitehall.com/ Journal of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Research http://jmier.elitehall.com/

China has experienced an incredible rate of growth in GDP in recent decades. Looking forward whether China’s economy will continue to remain stable and grow is of significant interest not only to China but also to the rest of the world. One significant challenge to the economic growth is China’s nascent financial markets. Recognizing the importance of a better financial system for more broad economic growth, the Chinese government has implemented a number of reforms in the financial markets. Moreover, the financial system itself constituents the major risks that the Chinese economy faces.

This special issue aims to invite scholarly writings that touch on any aspect of the challenges that relate to the reforms and risks in the financial markets and offer solutions as well as discuss the opportunities that could arise from such solutions. Papers in all areas of finance related to China are welcome, especially those on current issues such as shadow banking, internet finance, exchange rate reform, and local government debt, among others. The special issue will be guest-edited by Xiaoya Ding (University of San Francisco, USA), Chen Liu (Trinity Western University, Canada), and Ligang Zhong (University of Windsor, Canada).

PAPER SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. All submissions will be handled electronically. Those interested in submitting their work to this special issue should e-mail their papers to Ligang Zhong (lzhong@uwindsor.ca).
  2. Papers should be written in English and should contain original material that have not been previously published or currently submitted elsewhere.
  3. Papers should be double-spaced and limited to between 7000-10,000 words including references. All submitted papers will go through the standard double-blind reviewing process so be sure to include an additional page with the title and abstract but without the names of the authors.
  4. Final editorial decisions shall be sent to authors within two months and authors of accepted papers will be required to follow the formatting instructions and complete a “Consent to Publish” form.
  5. Please e-mail all queries to Ligang Zhong (lzhong@uwindsor.ca).

The bimonthly journal, Chinese Economy, published by Taylor and Francis Group, offers an objective and analytical account of economic issues concerning China. The journal publishes original works written by scholars from all over the world on recent changes to the Chinese economy. The Chinese Economy focuses on China’s current economic development as well as issues pertaining to the country’s trade, banking, and finances. Policy and research papers addressing macroeconomic and firm-level analysis are particularly welcome. Scholars and policy-makers will find The Chinese Economy informative as it provides relevant and rigorous analysis by experts on China.

The articles in this journal are listed in the Contents of Recent Economic Journals (COREJ) and the Journal of Economic Literature, and indexed in the Bibliography of Asian Studies Online, Econlit, e-JEL, and JEL on CD, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, International Bibliography of Periodical Literature on the Humanities and Social Sciences (IBZ), Emerging Sources Citation Index(ESCI), PAIS International, ProQuest Database, RePEc, and Scopus. Chinese Economy is ranked as B in the Australian Business Deans Council (ABDC) Journal Quality List.

Guest Editors:

Prof. Tamar Almor

College of Management, Academic Studies, Israel, talmor@colman.ac.il

Dr. Shlomo Y. Tarba

The University of Sheffield, UK, s.tarba@sheffield.ac.uk

 

 Background and Rationale for the Special Issue

Rapidly internationalizing, entrepreneurial companies seem to emerge more frequently in small countries with advanced economies, such as Israel, than in larger economies such as the U.S. (Efrat and Shoham, 2012; Freeman and Cavusgil, 2007; Gabrielsson and Kirpalani, 2004), and are often referred to in literature as “born-global” companies (Hashai 2011; Hewerdine and Welch, 2013; Melen and Rovira Nordman, 2009; Vasilchenko and Morrish, 2011). Born-global companies are characterized as having the ability to create innovative, self-developed, technology-based products that are sold internationally from the start of their existence (Rovira Nordman and Melen, 2008). Born-global companies are defined as business organizations that from the time of their founding or shortly thereafter seek superior international business performance, by creating knowledge-based resources and capabilities in which form the basis for sales in various countries (Almor, 2013; Gabrielsson and Kirpalani, 2004). While most research on this topic has focused on developed economies (Almor, 2011; Almor and Hashai, 2004; Efrat and Shoham, 2011; Hewerdine and Welch, 2013; Uner, Kocak, Cavusgil, and Cavusgil, 2013), case studies and incidental reporting seems to indicate that such companies can be found, with increasing frequency, in developing economies as well. However, to date, few empirical studies have been published on this topic.

Most empirical studies on born-global companies examine firms that exist for less than a decade. Moreover, the afore-mentioned studies deal primarily with issues of the initial survival and growth of these companies (Hashai and Almor 2004). Incidental case studies published in newspapers, however, have suggested that at least part of these entrepreneurial knowledge-intensive companies have now been in existence for about two decades, are maturing, and have been facing issues that differ from those encountered by the young firms. Furthermore, the maturing process of born-global companies seems to be a relatively new phenomenon that has not yet been researched to date, and therefore few questions have been raised regarding their maturation process (Glaister, Liu, Sahadev, and Gomes, 2014; Trudgen and Freeman, 2014). As a result, relatively little data exist about maturing born-global companies, whether or not they have survived as independent companies, and what international strategies they use to remain competitive (Almor, 2013; Almor, Tarba, Margalit, 2014) . Although there are many examples of born-global, technology-based companies that have been acquired by larger technology-based firms and have been merged into the larger businesses (e.g., Gomes, Weber, Brown, and Tarba, 2011; Weber and Tarba, 2011; Weber, Tarba, and Oberg, 2014), there are relatively few that have survived as independent entities and so far little research has addressed the topic of independent survival, the strategies employed to do so and the effect of culture, the management team as well as other factors, on the independent survival.

Despite the fact that about two decades of research exists regarding high-tech, born-global companies and international new ventures (INVs), many research gaps remain. The purpose of this special issue is to examine these gaps by addressing issues such as born global companies originating from developing countries, the relationships between collaborative agreements and survival of such companies, the effect of senior management and culture on survival and more, as explained below.

Topics for the special issue:

The goal of this special issue is to stimulate scholars to focus (i) on the challenges and strategies of small, international high-tech companies in the global environment at individual, group, and firm level as well as (ii) on the role of location (eg. quality of business location, impact of presence of clusters, etc.) of the home and/or of the host countries on the international high-tech companies competitiveness.

We encourage review, conceptual, and empirical contributions that may address, but are not limited to, the following topics:

The contributions may address, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  1. What are the antecedents, moderators/mediators, and outcomes of competitive and/or growth strategies pursued by small, international high-tech companies in developed and/or emerging economies?
  2. How does the macro-environmental and micro-environmental (industry) context in developed and/or emerging economies influence success/failure of collaborative partnerships (alliances, joint ventures, and M&A) established by small, international high-tech companies?
  3. How do clusters impact on the ability of born-global firms to emerge, to invest in specific location abroad and to perform in international markets?
  4. What is the impact of senior management on success/failure of collaborative partnerships (alliances, joint ventures, and M&A) established by small, international high-tech companies in developed and/or emerging economies?
  5. What skills, competencies, and behaviours the incumbent managers and employees need to learn and practice in order to enable small, international high-tech companies' success in developed and/or emerging economies?
  6. What is the impact of strategic agility and organizational ambidexterity on success/failure of small, international high-tech companies in developed and/or emerging economies?
  7. What are the social, economic and environmental implications of innovation management (product vs. process innovation) in small, international high-tech companies' success in developed and/or emerging economies?
  8. What are the value-creating and value-capturing factors in small, international high-tech companies in developed and/or emerging economies?
  9. What is the impact of emotions and resilience on success/failure of small, international high-tech companies in developed and/or emerging economies?
  10. What is the influence of national cultural distance and corporate (organizational) differences on success/failure of small, international high-tech companies in developed and/or emerging economies?
  11. What is the impact of venture capital funds on success/failure of small, international high-tech companies in developed and/or emerging economies?
  12. What is the effect of collaborative agreements between governmental and industry bodies and academics institutions on success/failure of small, international high-tech companies in developed and/or emerging economies?

References:

Almor, T. (2011). Dancing as fast as they can: Israeli high-tech firms and the great recession of 2008. Thunderbird International Business Review, 53, 109-276.

Almor, T. (2013). Conceptualizing paths of growth for the technology-based, born-global firm originating in a small population, advanced economy. International Studies of Management & Organization, 43(2), 56-78.

Almor, T., & Hashai, N. (2004). Competitive advantage and strategic configuration of knowledge-intensive small and medium sized multinationals: A modified resource based view. Journal of International Management, 10, 479-500.

Almor, T., Tarba, S. Y., & Margalit, A. (2014). Maturing, technology-based, born-global companies: Surviving through mergers and acquisitions. Management International Review, (Forthcoming, doi: 10.1007/s11575-014-0212-9). 

Efrat, K., & Shoham, A. (2011). Environmental characteristics and technological capabilities' interaction in high-technology born global firms. European Journal of International Management, 5(3), 271-284. 

Efrat, K., & Shoham, A. (2012). Born-global firms: The differences between their short-and long-term performance drivers. Journal of World Business47, 675-685.

Gomes, E., Weber, Y., Brown, C., and Tarba, S.Y. (2011). Mergers, Acquisitions and Strategic Alliances: Understanding The Process. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Freeman, S., & Cavusgil, T. (2007). Towards a typology of commitment states among managers of born-global firms: A study of accelerated internationalization. Journal of International Marketing, 15(4), 1-40.

Gabrielsson, M., & Kirpalani, V.H.M. (2004). Born globals: How to reach new business space rapidly. International Business Review, 13, 555-571.

Glaister, A. J., Liu, Y., Sahadev, S., & Gomes, E. (2014). Externalizing, internalizing and fostering commitment: The case of born-global firms in emerging economies. Management International Review, (Forthcoming, doi: 10.1007/s11575-014-0215-6)

Hashai N., & Almor T. (2004). Gradually internationalization 'born-global' firms: An oxymoron? International Business Review,13, 465-483

Hashai, N. (2011). Sequencing the expansion of geographic scope and foreign operations by “born-global” firms”. Journal of International Business Studies42(8), 995-1015.

Hewerdine, L., & Welch, C. (2013). Are international new ventures really new? A process study of organizational emergence and internationalization. Journal of World Business48(4), 466-477.

Melen, S., & Rovira Nordman, E. (2009). The internationalisation modes of born globals: A longitudinal study. European Management Journal27, 243-254.

Rovira Nordman, E., & Melen, S. (2008). The impact of different kinds of knowledge for the internationalization process of born globals in the biotech business. Journal of World Business43, 171-185.

Trudgen, R., & Freeman, S. (2014). Measuring the performance of born-global firms throughout their development process: The roles of initial market selection and internationalisation speed. Management International Review, (Forthcoming, doi: 10.1007/s11575-014-0210-y). 

Uner, M. M., Kocak, A., Cavusgil, E., & Cavusgil, S. T. (2013). Do barriers to export vary for born globals and across stages of internationalization? An empirical inquiry in the emerging market of Turkey. International Business Review, 22(5), 800-813. 

Vasilchenko, E., & Morrish, S. (2011). The role of entrepreneurial networks in the exploration and exploitation of internationalization opportunities by information and communication technology firms. Journal of International Marketing, 19(4), 88-105.

Weber, Y., & Tarba, S. Y. (2011). Exploring integration approach in related mergers: Post-merger integration in the high-tech industry. International Journal of Organizational Analysis19, 202–221.

Weber, Y., Tarba, S.Y., and Oberg, C. (2013). A Comprehensive Guide to Mergers and Acquisitions: Managing the Critical Success Factors Across Every Stage of the M&A Process. USA & UK: Financial Times Press.

Submissions:

All papers will be subject to double-blind peer review, according to author guidelines available at : http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cr

 Submissions to Competitiveness Review are made using ScholarOne Manuscripts: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/comprev (please select the correct special issue from the drop-down menu)

Submission deadline: March 31, 2015. However, earlier submissions are encouraged.

The review process will take approximately up to 6 months.

About the special issue editors

Tamar Almor (talmor@colman.ac.ilis a professor of Strategic Management and International Entrepreneurship at School of Business Administration, College of Management, Israel. She received her PhD from Tel-Aviv University, Israel. Her research interests include new entrepreneurial ventures, born global firms, innovation strategies, and mergers and acquisitions. Her work has been published in journals such as Journal of International Business Studies, Management International Review, Human Relations, Research Policy, International Business ReviewInternational Studies of Management & Organization, Journal of International ManagementThunderbird International Business Review, and others.

Shlomo Y. Tarba (s.tarba@sheffield.ac.ukis a Lecturer in Strategic Management at the Management School, University of Sheffield, UK. He received his PhD in Strategic Management from Ben-Gurion University and Master's in Biotechnology degree at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. His research interests include strategic agility, born global firms, organizational ambidexterity and innovation, and mergers and acquisitions.

His research papers are published/forthcoming in journals such as Journal of Management, Academy of Management Perspectives, Management International Review, California Management Review, International Business Review, International Journal of Human Resource Management, Thunderbird International Business Review, International Studies of Management & Organization, Human Resource Management Review, and others.

The Japanese economy faced numerous challenges in the past decades. Among them are severe shocks caused by natural disasters and by domestic and international financial crises, but also long-term fundamental transformations like demographic change, globalization and digitalization as well as economic reforms addressing the labor market, corporate governance and employment practices. In this special issue, we want to take stock of how the changes in the economic, regulatory, technological and international environment affected the Japanese employment system (system level), and the recruitment, management and development of human resources (management level) since the year 2000. Papers may either address the system or management level. We aim at an overall balance between system and management level analyses.

Guiding questions are:

  • To what extent did adjustments occur?
  • To what extent did they differ across industries and firms?
  • To what extent do we see continuity?

Multi-disciplinary perspectives and a wide range of research methodologies (such as literature reviews, qualitative or quantitative studies) are welcome. All papers (max 6000 words each) will go through a double-blind peer-review process.

Keywords: Japanese Employment System, Japanese Labor Markets, Japanese Management, Japanese Human Resource Management, Lifetime Employment.

Deadline for manuscript transmissions: July 31, 2019

Please send your manuscript to parissa@haghirian.com

Editor: Dr. Parissa HaghirianProfessor of International ManagementSophia University, Japan www.haghirian.com

50th Anniversary Special Issue of the Journal of International Business Studies

Tentative publication date:   late 2019

The Academy of International Business (AIB) is a social community of scholars dedicated to creating and disseminating knowledge on international business (IB) challenges, with JIBS as its main, global conduit for publishing leading research.

In 2019, JIBS will be celebrating its 50th anniversary. The 50th year anniversary issue of the journal will address the broad issue of ‘Changing the World: How IB Research Makes a Difference.’ The anniversary issue will include scholarly pieces that can be theoretical in nature, empirical, or managerially oriented. Each paper will showcase how the research presented has made a difference to changing the world in a tangible fashion (retrospective work) or could do so in the foreseeable future (prospective work). The ‘world’ can refer to an entire subfield of IB research and teaching, or to mainstream managerial practice, or both. A few examples of past IB research that clearly meets the ‘changing the world’ criterion, include C. Bartlett and S. Ghoshal’s work on the transnational solution; G. Hofstede’s work on culture’s consequences; W.C. Kim and R. Mauborgne’s work on procedural justice in multinational enterprises; and S. Zaheer’s work on overcoming the liability of foreignness.

However, IB research making a difference should be interpreted generously, especially for prospective work aimed at transforming contemporary academic discourse or managerial practice. The work of IB researchers provides insight on IB phenomena, but whether an entire subfield of IB research and teaching, or mainstream managerial practice will be significantly altered by this insight, is never guaranteed. For example, in the face of well-researched, unambiguous conclusions on linkages between specific managerial actions and performance (or the absence thereof), mistaken views from the past might still reign for long periods of time, whether in research and teaching, or in managerial practice.

The JIBS Editors will consider work that includes how IB research is affecting – or is constructively interacting with – functional fields in management and other social sciences, so as to address more effectively critical IB subject matter. The subject matter studied can range from micro-foundational challenges to society’s grand questions. The reference to ‘critical’ subject matter means that the work should have major implications for our understanding of the governance, the strategy or the performance of internationally operating firms. Of special interest is work on internationally operating firms that goes against common perceptions, and that provides balanced analysis of the costs and benefits of particular managerial choices or courses of action. One example is analysis of the vulnerability of MNE networks and value chains, rather than the supposed market power thereof. A second example is integrative analysis of entry strategy (including mode mixes and in-depth study of firms’ entire foreign-operations portfolios) and the effects of compounded distance, seldom found in past research. A third example includes fact-based analysis of the outcomes of firm-level, industry-level and macro-level decisions and actions fostering globalization or de-globalization. Of particular interest is also how IB research can make a tangible difference in the practice of management, whether by increasing economic efficiency, creating better outcomes for a variety of stakeholders, or even improving the welfare of mankind broadly construed.

As regards theoretical papers, the JIBS Editors have a preference for path-breaking work, rather than incremental contributions, though radical new ideas should be solidly grounded in extant research. For empirical work, the JIBS Editors would like to see submissions that build mainly on primary data, rather than secondary data, in order to maximize the likelihood of truly path-breaking work, and with the authors having an unambiguously strong command of their data. Finally, papers with a distinct managerial flavor have been a hallmark of JIBS since 1970. In keeping with this tradition, the anniversary issue aims to include pieces that combine ‘state-of-the-art’ scholarly insight with important, evidence-based recommendations for management. As noted above, retrospective work, credibly documenting achievements of IB research in truly ‘making a difference’, will also receive full consideration.

The JIBS Editors are inviting submissions aligned with the ‘changing the world’ theme, and subject to the above qualifications, in three tracks.

Track 1: Theory papers making distinct contributions to the ‘changing the world’ theme, by recombining elements of IB theory with state-of-the-art findings from functional fields in management and from other social sciences.

Track 2: Empirical papers making distinct contributions to the ‘changing the world’ theme, by building mainly on primary data, and providing truly novel insight into the critical subject matter covered.

Track 3: Managerial-practice oriented papers making distinct contributions to the ‘changing the world’ theme, through evidence-based guidance on how to improve the governance, strategy or performance of internationally operating firms.

Submission Process and Deadlines

All manuscripts for the JIBS 50th Anniversary Issue will be reviewed as a cohort. Manuscripts must be submitted during the period July 9–20, 2018, to: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jibs

All submissions will go through a first, fast-track evaluation round, conducted by the JIBS Reviewing Editor and Editor-in-Chief, to assess the suitability for the Anniversary Issue. Papers viewed as being sufficiently aligned with the ‘changing the world’ goals will be assigned to a member of the JIBS Editors team for further evaluation and subjected to double-blind review. High-quality submissions insufficiently aligned with the anniversary issue’s goals will be reassigned to the standard evaluation process for regular JIBS issues.

It is anticipated that a formal workshop will be organized for the papers that have passed the first round of double-blind reviews, in order to provide editorial guidance for additional revisions. This workshop will likely be organized in late 2018.

For more information about this Call for Papers, please contact the JIBS Managing Editor (managing-editor@jibs.net).

China has firmly installed itself as a key player in the world trade and investment arena. Not even four decades since its opening up, it has surpassed Germany and the United States to become the world’s largest exporter. Adding to this, it has recently become the world’s largest recipient of foreign direct investment (FDI) as well as the largest source of outward FDI (if Hong Kong is included). Originally, the key driver of China’s growing clout in international economy has been its export-led growth strategy. From the onset of its open-door policy in the early eighties, China has made attraction of export-oriented FDI a key element of its development path. Abundant supplies of low-cost labor and artificially cheap inputs to production, as well as an undervalued currency, contributed to China’s attraction of FDI and its comparative advantage in low-skilled exports. Decades of rapid economic growth, however, are now threatening to undermine China’s export-led growth. Rising labor costs (especially in the coastal area), tightening regulations and currency appreciation have gradually eroded China’s comparative advantage in low-skilled exports. As a consequence, China has spent significant resources trying to rebalance its economy by moving from an export-led growth strategy to a consumption-led growth model and by pushing the companies to upgrade their activities up a global value chain.

The new trends beg a serious question how China’s Great Rebalancing Act affects the country’s integration in the world economy. Is China’s growing middle class changing the type of FDI that it is able to attract? Is China’s export sector moving up the value chain and specializing in higher-skilled activities such as innovation? What explains the massive rise of Chinese outward FDI? And how does all this matter for China’s economic performance?

This special issue aims to provide insights into these questions by exploring and explaining new trends in China’s exports, FDI inflows and outflows. We welcome both theoretical and empirical contributions adopting different perspectives, and focusing on different levels of analysis and research methodologies. Particularly, we welcome empirical papers that make use of original data and that can explain their findings non-technically and for wider audiences. Possible research questions that would suit to this special issue include but are not limited to the following: What is the impact of inward FDI on investment, innovation and industrial sophistication in China? What is the impact of outward FDI on China’s economic integration and development? How do China’s shift towards services and the emergency of the middle class affect FDI flows and global economy?

The submission deadline for this special issue is 31 August 2016. Potential author(s) are encouraged to send us a proposal or abstract for pre-review by 31 May 2016 to the Managing (Guest) Editor(s) at tncr.special@gmail.com with an email subject “China CER Special”.

When China's leaders surveyed their development prospects at the onset of the twenty-first century, they reached an increasingly obvious conclusion, namely that their current economic development strategy, heavily dependent on natural resources, fossil fuel, exports based on cheap labour, and extensive capital investment, was no longer viable or attractive. For a range of pressing competitiveness, national security, and sustainability reasons, they decided to shift gears and as a result have embarked on an effort to move their country in the direction of building a so-called “knowledge-based economy”; in this new model, innovation and high-end talent are positioned as the new primary drivers of enhanced economic performance. Underlying this transition also seems to be a rather pervasive sense of urgency about the need for China to catch up more quickly with the rest of the world, especially in terms of science and technology (S&T) capabilities. In fact, the top echelon of Chinese leaders, foremost among them both President Hu Jintao and Premier Wen Jiabao, has recognized that enhancing innovation performance and harnessing the country's huge talent resources are crucial to China's ability to cope with an increasingly competitive international environment, build a comprehensively well-off and harmonious society and, more importantly, consolidate and fortify the ruling base of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP).

At the core of China's efforts to enhance its R&D capabilities and performance lies the steadily evolving Chinese national innovation system (NIS). Since the 1980s, there has emerged a growing literature in the West regarding the concept of the NIS; this literature has formed the focal point for Chinese efforts at both the national and local level to develop and enhance their own indigenous capabilities, science and technology. China's NIS differs from those in other developed countries, not only in organizational terms (Yifei, 2002), but also in terms of the strategic role of the innovation system in China's efforts to advance its national S&T capabilities. In 2006, the State Council announced the launch of the 15-year “Medium-to-Long-term Plan Outline for the Development of National Science and Technology (2006-2020)” (MLP) to promote more rapidly China's scientific and technological progress (Ministry of Science and Technology of the PRC, 2006). A key goal of the MLP is to “push forward the comprehensive establishment of a national innovation system with Chinese characteristics.” Understanding precisely what is meant by “Chinese characteristics” reveals much about the nature of innovation in China. It also will promote greater understanding of the steadily more pivotal role of the enterprise in driving the overall performance and productivity of China's NIS.

As of 2009, this new, very strong emphasis on innovation, talent and high-end knowledge seems to have begun to pay off, as China has built an indigenous innovation system that is very different from the Soviet-inspired one that existed for most of the Maoist era and well into the era of Deng Xiaoping. In fact, it is increasingly clear that China is now not only better positioned for, but also steadily more confident about, becoming a true technological power on both regional and global levels. In fact, one can now identify several new, emerging pockets of excellence across the spectrum of Chinese industries and technologies. Moreover, it is also obvious to Chinese scientific leaders that the country's recent progress and future potential can be explicitly attributed to the increasing role of the nation's talent assets. It is quite clear that China already has begun to move away from being the so- called “factory to the world.” Increasingly, China is relying more on brainpower than brawn to drive and shape its economic future. In this regard, the rise of China as a global technological power, even taking into account many of the PRC's prevailing shortcomings, is have important consequences for the country internally as well as externally. In this context, we might ask, is China really poised to become a substantial force in global innovation? In which fields is China likely to make its impact felt most? What might be the specific implications for China of having a more dynamic, proactive science and engineering talent pool? And what broad potential impact will China's innovation on global technological competition and international technological advance during the first part of the twenty-first century?

This special issue calls for papers that review and highlight the workings and performance of China's national innovation system at both the macro and micro levels. We are looking precisely for papers that can highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the Chinese innovation system in terms of organizational structure and performance; management of R&D in specific sectors; handling of S&T budgets and financial resources; supply, demand and utilization of scientific and engineering talent; and China's evolving role and positioning in the global innovation system. Both industry and enterprise case studies and technology-oriented research are welcome. Contributions by scholars from Mainland China are particularly encouraged. An internal Chinese perspective on the structure, operation and management of R&D in China from a so-called “insider point of view” will greatly enhance our knowledge about the operation and performance of the innovation system, including both its limits and its potential.

The primary criterion for consideration of publication is that manuscripts should be on research and application, and must be grounded in organizations operating in China. Contributed manuscripts may deal with, but are not restricted to, the following:

* The “culture of creativity” and its limits in the Chinese research environment.
* Innovation and the challenges of technological entrepreneurship.
* Innovative performance of small versus large firms in China.
* Case studies regarding the operation and performance of foreign R&D centres in China.
* The supply, demand and utilization of high end talent, including the role of returnees in altering the innovation environment.
* Case studies of indigenous innovation across one to two technology fields.
* Analysis and assessment of the enterprise R&D environment.


Submission guidelines
All manuscripts should be prepared according to the Chinese Management Studies author guidelines located at: www.emeraldinsight.com/cms.htm. All papers will be double blind reviewed following the journal's normal review procedure.

The deadline for submission of manuscripts is: 1 April 2010.

Submissions must be made using the ScholarOne Manuscript Central system: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cms

Please direct enquiries to: Professor Denis Fred Simon, Penn State University: dfs12@psu.edu



References
Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China (2006), ``Medium-to-Long-term Plan Outline for the Development of National Science and Technology (2006-2020) (MLP)'', China Science and Technology Newsletter, No. 456, February 9.
Yifei, S. (2002), ``China's national innovation system in transition'' Eurasian Geography and Economics, Vol. 43, pp. 476-93.

Bibliography
Cao, C., Suttmeier, R.P., and Simon, D. (2006), ``China's 15-year science and technology plan'', Physics Today, December.
Rowen, H.S. (Ed.) (2008), Greater China's Quest for Innovation, Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
Simon, D.F. and Cao, C., China's Emerging Technological Edge: Assessing the Role of High-End Talent, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Suttmeier, R.P., Cao, C. and Simon, D. (2006a), ``China's Super Science Center: knowledge innovation and the remaking of the Chinese Academy of Sciences'', Science, April.
Suttmeier, R.P., Cao, C. and Simon, D. (2006b), ``China's innovation challenge and the re-making of the Chinese Academy of Sciences'', Innovations, December.
Thomson, R.E. and Sigurdson, J. (Eds) (2008), China's Science and Technology Sector, World Scientific Publishing, Singapore.

Clusters and MNEs innovation strategies

Editors: Philippe Gugler and Christian Ketels

Submission deadline : August 30th 2014

The Competitiveness Review invites research papers in the field of clusters and MNEs innovation strategies and in particular on the role of clusters in home and host countries as location advantages fostering MNEs competitiveness

The evolution of the global economy and improved access to goods and resources from distant locations have placed knowledge at the core of firms’ competitive advantages (Zander and Kogut, 1995, p. 76; Jensen and Szulanski, 2007, p. 1716; Sala-I-Martin et al., 2012, p. 7). As a result of their ability to supersede the market and internalize the benefits of the geographic distribution of their activities, multinational enterprises (MNEs) have distributed their value chain around the world and implemented a global network of subsidiaries that allow them to take advantage of the specific profile of different environments (Sölvell, 2002, p. 3; Ketels, 2008, p. 124; Mudambi and Swift, 2011, p. 1).

Firms are constantly driven to generate new knowledge to maintain a competitive edge (Sala-I-Martin et al., 2012, p. 7). The important role of the internationalization of R&D has been studied in detail since the 1990s (Kummerle, 1997; Cantwell et al., 2004, p. 58; Criscuolo, 2004, p. 39). Since the 1980s, strategic asset-seeking investments have exhibited increased importance as a significant motivator for FDI and have helped explain the increased internationalization of R&D (Dunning and Narula, 1995; Dunning, 1998, p. 50).  

Because MNEs have the special ability to internalize the benefits of their geographic dispersion of activities, they can significantly improve their competitive advantages by spreading their activities across locations and taking advantage of the specificities of each business environment (Sölvell, 2002, p. 3; Dunning, 2008, p. 83). Innovation scholars have analyzed the tendency of innovative activities to concentrate spatially (Kline and Rosenberg, 1986; Freeman 1991; Nelson 1993; Malmberg et al., 1996). As noted by Maskell and Malmberg (1999, p. 172) and Asheim and Gertler (2005, p. 292), tacit knowledge represents a key ingredient in the development of unique capacities and innovations.  

Although the literature on innovation and new knowledge generation has provided significant documentation of the benefits of agglomeration, few studies have analyzed the role of clusters in the global innovation strategies of knowledge-intensive MNEs (Dunning, 1998, p. 60; Birkinshaw and Sölvell, 2000, p. 3; Tavares and Texeira, 2006, p. 1; De Beule et al., 2008; p. 224; Asmussen et al., 2009; Mudambi and Swift, 2010, p. 463). Knowledge capabilities and innovation are the main drivers of a firm’s competitiveness (Zander and Kogut, 1995, p. 76; Jensen and Szulandski, 2007, p. 1716).

Clusters appear to be a unique source of knowledge dissemination and generation and may play an important role in the global innovation strategy of MNEs (Birkinshaw and Sölvell, 2000; Tavares and Teixeira, 2006; Mudambi and Swift, 2010). Defined in their strictest sense as “geographic concentrations of interconnected companies, specialized suppliers, service providers, firms in related industries, and associated institutions in particular fields” (Porter, 1998, p. 197-198), clusters provide an environment that is particularly conducive to innovation. In addition to the positive influence of clusters on productivity and new business creation, recent empirical studies have confirmed the role of clusters in the stimulation of innovation (Jaffe, 1989; Feldman, 1994; Baptista, 2001; Audretsch et al., 2005; Breschi et al., 2005; Cumbers et al., 2008; De Beule et al., 2008).

By referring to the traditional notions developed in the international business (IB) literature, clusters not only offer strong CSAs for regions and countries but also represent unique sources of FSAs for MNEs in their perpetual quest for new knowledge and innovation. Clusters represent a new target for strategic asset-seeking investments in the global innovation strategies of MNEs that we could label “CSA-cluster.”  As highlighted by Rugman and Verbeke, “(…) an FSA may be developed internally from three possible geographic locations, each associated with particular CSAs: a home country operation, a host country operation, or an internal network whereby operations in various countries are involved” (2001, p. 240).

These three dimensions are particularly important for knowledge-intensive MNEs to improve their FSAs. The acquisition and generation of new knowledge through home and host cluster relationships may constitute a unique source of new knowledge and innovation for MNEs (Park, 2011; Yao et al., 2013; Nell and Andersson, 2012). (Note: this text above is extracted from a paper in progress of Gugler, Keller and Tinguely).

Themes of this special issue:

We welcome submissions that provide a contribution through interdisciplinary approaches. We invite conceptual papers and empirical studies based on qualitative and/or quantitative methods. Potential themes includes, but are not limited to:

  •       How MNEs develop innovative capabilities thanks to their location with host countries’ clusters?
  •       Which kind of interactions with clusters’ members are the most appropriate for MNEs to operate R&D and innovate?
  •       To what extend clusters constitute an important asset for countries to attract technology intensive MNEs?
  •       To what extend clusters constitute a valuable alternative to other mean to get access to foreign technology?
  •       How MNEs may organize and manage their internal and external networks in combination with clusters activities within their home and host countries?
  •       How clusters constitute powerful home and host CSAs and how to consider clusters in the literature based on the interactions between FSAs and CSAs?
  •       Do clusters create negatives externalities for firms that may induce some firms to adopt specific strategies to avoid that their knowledge being “lost” through spillovers within a cluster ?
  •       How cluster initiatives may play a crucial role to attract technology intensive MNEs?

Submissions:

  1.      All papers will be subject to double-blind peer review, according to author guidelines available at: www.emeraldinsight.com/cr.htm
  2.      Submissions to Competitiveness Review are made using ScholarOne Manuscripts: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/comprev (please select the correct special issue from the drop-down menu)

Submission deadline : August 30th 2014

Papers will be published in 2015.

References:

Asheim, B.T. and Gertler, M.S. (2005), “The Geography of Innovation – Regional Innovation Systems,” in J. Fagerberg, D. C. Mowery and R. R. Nelson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Innovation, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 291-317.

Asmussen, C.G., Pedersen, T. And Dhanaraj, C. (2009), Host-Country Environment and Subsidiary Competence: Extending the Diamond Network Model, Journal of International Business Studies 40 (1): 42-57.

Audretsch, D.B., Lehmann, E.E. and Warning, S. (2005), University Spillovers and New Firm Location, Research Policy 34: 1113-1122.

Baptista, R. (2001), Geographical Clusters and Innovation Diffusion, Technological Forecasting and Social Change 66 (1): 31-46..

Birkinshaw, J. and Sölvell, Ö. (2000), Preface, International Studies of Management and Organization 30 (2): 3-9.

Breschi, S., Lissoni, F. and Montobbio, F. (2005), “The Geography of Knowledge Spillovers: Conceptual Issues and Measurement Problems,” in S. Breschi and F. Malerba (eds.), Clusters, Networks, and Innovation, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 343-376.

Cantwell, J., Glac, K. and Harding, R. (2004), The Internationalization of R&D – The Swiss Case, Management International Review 44 (3): 57-82.

China. In: Henderson, J.V. & Thisse, J.F. (eds.). Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Vol 4. Elsevier, Amsterdam.

Criscuolo, P. (2004), R&D Internationalisation and Knowledge Transfer: Impact on MNEs and their Home Countries. Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology.

Cumbers, A., MacKinnon, D. and Chapman, K. (2008), “Innovation, Collaboration and Learning in Regional Clusters: A Study of SMEs in the Aberdeen Oil Complex,” in C. Karlsson (eds.), Handbook of Research on Innovation and Clusters, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 300-317.

De Beule, F., Van Den Bulcke, D. and Zhang, H. (2008), “The Reciprocal Relationship between Transnationals and Clusters: A Literature Review,” in C. Karlsson (eds.), Handbook of Research on Cluster Theory, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Dunning, J.H. (1998), Location and the Multinational Enterprise: A Neglected Factor?, Journal of International Business Studies 29 (1): 45-66.

Dunning, J.H. (2008), “Space, Location and Distance in IB Activities: A Changing Scenario,” in J.H. Dunning and P. Gugler (eds.), Foreign Direct Investment, Location and Competitiveness, Oxford: Elsevier, 83-110.

Dunning, J.H. and Narula, R. (1995), The R&D Activities of Foreign Firms in the US, International Studies in Management Organization 25: 39-73.

Economic Literature, American Economic Association, 28 (4), pp. 1661–1707.

Feldman, M.P. (1994), The Geography of Innovation, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Freeman, C. (1991), Networks of Innovators: A Synthesis of Research Issues, Research Policy 20: 499-514.

Jaffe, A.B. (1989), Real Effects of Academic Research, The American Economic Review 79 (5): 957-970.

Jensen, R.J. and Szulanski, G. (2007), Template Use and the Effectiveness of Knowledge Transfer, Management Science 53 (11): 1716-1730.

Ketels, C.H.M. (2008), “Microeconomic Determinants of Location Competitiveness for MNEs,” in J.H. Dunning and P. Gugler (eds.), Foreign Direct Investment, Location and Competitiveness, Oxford: Elsevier, 111-131.

Kline, S.J., and Rosenberg, N. (1986), “An Overview of Innovation,” in R. Landau and N. Rosenberg (eds.), The Positive Sum Strategy: Harnessing Technology for Economic Growth, Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 275-304.

Kuemmerle W. (1997), Building Effective R&D Capabilities Abroad, Harvard Business Review 75 March, 61-70.

Malmberg, A., Sölvell, Ö. and Zander, I. (1996), Spatial Clustering, Local Accumulation of Knowledge and Firm Competitiveness, Geografiska Annaler 78 B (2): 85-97.

Maskell, P. and Malmberg, A. (1999), Localized Learning and Industrial Competitiveness, Cambridge Journal of Economics 23: 167-86.

Mudambi R. and Swift T. (2011), Leveraging knowledge and competencies across space: The next frontier in international business, Journal of International Management 17 (3), 186-189.

Mudambi, R. and Swift, T. (2010), “Technological Clusters and Multinational Enterprise R&D Strategy,” in T. Devinney, T. Pedersen and L. Tihany (eds.), The Past, The Present and The Future of International Business and Management, Volume 23, Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing.

Nell P.C. and Andersson U. (2012), The complexity of the business network context and its effect on subsidiary relational (over-) embeddedness, International Business Review 21 (6), 1087-1098.

Nelson, R.R. (1993), National Systems of Innovation: A Comparative Study, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Park B.I. (2011), Knowledge transfer capacity of multinational enterprises and technology acquisition in international joint ventures, International Business Review 20 (1), 75-87.

Porter, M.E. (1998), On Competition, Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Rugman, A.M. and Verbeke, A. (2001), “Location, Competitiveness, and the Multinational Enterprise,” in A.M. Rugman and T. Brewer (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of International Business, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 150-177.

Sala-I-Martin, X., Bilbao-Osorio, B., Blanke, J., Crotti, R., Drzeniek Hanouz, M, Geiger, T. and Ko, C. (2012), “The Global Competitiveness Index 2012-2013: Strengthening Recovery by Raising Productivity,” in K. Schwab, The Global Competitiveness Report 2012-2013, Geneva: World Economic Forum, 3-48.

Sölvell, Ö. (2002), The Multi-Home Based Multinational – Combining Global Competitiveness and Local Innovativeness, Paper presented at the Symposium in honor of John Stopford, London.

Tavares, A. T. and Teixeira, A. (2006), “Introduction,” in A.T. Tavares and A. Teixeira (eds.), Multinationals, Clusters and Innovation: Does Public Policy Matter, New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Yao Z., Yang Z., Fisher G.J., Ma C. And Fang E. (2013), Knowledge complementarity, knowledge absorption effectiveness, and new product performance: The exploration of international joint ventures in China, International Business Review 22 (1), 216-227.

Zander, U. and Kogut, B. (1995), Knowledge and the Speed of the Transfer and Imitation of Organizational Capabilities: An Empirical Test, Organization Science 6 (1): 76-92.

Information and communication technologies drive globalization and have radically changed the organization of work structures within organizations. The organizations have responded by progressively shifting from traditional collocated teams to global virtual teams (GVTs) (Webster and Wong, 2008; Zakaria, 2008). The effective use of GVTs has become an indispensable prerequisite to implementing global strategies of Multinational Enterprises (MNEs) and independent firms working together in international networks (Lovelace et al., 2005). Several authors report that more than 60% of managers work regularly in virtual teams (de Lisser, 1999; Kanawattanachai and Yoo, 2002; Hertel, Geister, and Kondradt, 2005).

Global virtual teams can be defined as “temporary, culturally diverse, geographically dispersed, and electronically communicating work group[s]” (Jarvenpaa and Leidner, 1999). GVTs are not constrained by traditional geographic and time boundaries and can offer many advantages if properly managed. As Duckworth (2008) points out, through GVTs MNEs can economize on travel, immigration, expat relocation costs and save time. GVTs help improve efficiency by seamlessly distributing workload across different time zones. Importantly, the different backgrounds, local networks and knowledge resources of locally embedded team members create new opportunities to leverage complementarities, creativity and innovation.

However, to live up to their full potential, MNEs need to address crucial challenges of GVTs, such as time-zone differences (Sutanto, Kankanhalli and Tan, 2011), work styles (Liu, Magjuka and Lee, 2008), communication via low-context and low-media-richness channels across cultures (Butler and Zander, 2008) and leadership as well as technological-related issues hindering effective communication (Flammia, Cleary and Slattery, 2010).

This new phenomenon entails several important repercussions for management theories regarding the boundaries of the firm, principal-agent relationships, organizational learning, appropriability and social networks, among others. The growing importance of GVTs is also affecting the contents of the business curriculum, as many universities and business schools are implementing activities to teach and train students how to effectively work in this type of teams and how to cope with challenges mentioned above (Taras et al. 2013). As the crucial role of GVTs is only expected to grow more in the years to come, we encourage scholars to examine GVTs from different theoretical perspectives and empirical approaches in order to achieve implications relevant both for academics and practitioners.

This Special Issue aims to attract contributions that offer a fine-grained analysis of the distinct aspects that affect the behavior and performance of GVTs. Specifically, how can MNEs benefit from the several potential advantages that a smart management of this kind of team may provide? How can MNEs avoid the common pitfalls of GVTs? We welcome theoretical, empirical, methodological and case studies submissions addressing, but not limited to, the following issues:

 

  1. Advantages and disadvantages of GVTs vis à vis traditional collocated teams.
  2. Determinants and characteristics of successful GVTs.
  3. Knowledge-creation, dissemination and leakages in GVTs.
  4. Open collaboration and GVT-headquarters relationships.
  5. The process of creation and development of GVTs over time.
  6. Differences in GVTs composition and performance across industries.
  7. Leadership and team-dynamics in GVTs.
  8. Improving inter-personal communication, team cohesion and trust among GVT members.
  9. The impact of cross-cultural differences among GVT members on the team performance.
  10. Language-related issues in GVTs.
  11. Information and communication technologies and GVTs.
  12. The multifaceted role of distance (geographical, institutional, psychic, cultural, etc) in GVTs.
  13. Training employees and students how to effectively work in a GVT.
  14. The relationship between the use of GVTs and firm performance.
  15. GVTs and employee satisfaction.
  16. Reducing shirking and cheating in GVTs
  17. Trends in the use of GVT around the world – who makes use of them, who does not, and why?
  18. The role of GVTs in global business strategy.

Submission information

The deadline for manuscript submission is March 8, 2016. Manuscripts should be prepared in accordance with Journal of International Management’s Style Guide for Authors: http://www.elsevier.com/journals/journal-of-international-management/1075-4253/guide-for-authors and submitted through the Journal’s submission website.

To ensure that all manuscripts are correctly identified for consideration for this Special Issue, it is important that authors select ‘SI: Global Virtual Teams’ when they reach the “Article Type” step in the submission process.

Please direct any questions regarding the Special Issue to Alfredo Jimenez (ajimenez@ubu.es), Dirk Boehe (dirk.boehe@adelaide.edu.au), Vasyl Taras (v_taras@uncg.edu), and Dan Caprar (dan.caprar@unsw.edu.au).

References

Butler, C., Zander, L. 2008. The business of teaching and learning through multicultural teams. Journal of Teaching in International Business, 19(2), 192-218.

de Lisser, E. 1999. Update on Small Business: Firms with Virtual Environments Appeal to Workers. Wall Street Journal, October 5, 1999.

Duckworth, H. 2008. How TRW automotive helps global virtual teams perform at the top of their game. Global Business and Organizational Excellence, 28, 6-16.

Flammia, M., Cleary, Y., Slattery, D. M. 2010. Leadership roles, socioemotional communication strategies, and technology use of Irish and US students in virtual teams. IEEE Transactions of Professional Communication, 53(2), 89-101.

Hertel, G., S. Geister., U. Kondradt. 2005. Managing virtual teams: A review of current empirical research. Human Resource Management Review, 15, 65-95.

Jarvenpaa, S.L., Leidner, D.E. 1999 Communication and Trust in Global Virtual Teams, Organization Science 10, 791–815.

Kanawattanachai, P., Yoo, Y. 2002. Dynamic nature of trust in virtual teams. The Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 11(3-4), 187-213.

Liu, X., Magjuka, R.J., Lee, s. 2008. An examination of the relationship among structure, trust, and conflict management styles in virtual teams. Performance Improvement Quarterly, 21(1), 77-93.

Lovelace, K., Shapiro, D. L., Weingart, L. R. 2001. Maximizing cross-functional new Product teams’ innovativeness and constraint adherence: A conflict communications perspective. Academy of Management Journal, 44(4), 479-493.

Sutanto, J., Kankanhalli, A., Tan, B. C. Y. 2011. Deriving IT-mediated task coordination portfolios for global virtual teams. IEEE Transactions of Professional Communication, 54(2), 133-151.

Taras, V., Caprar, D., Rottig, D., Sarala, R., Zakaria, N., Zhao, F., Jimenez, A., Wankel, C., Lei, W.S., Minor, M., Bryła, P., Ordenana, X., Bode, A., Schuster, A., Vaiginiene, E., Froese, F., Bathula, H., Yajnik, N., Baldegger R., Huang V., 2013. A global classroom? Evaluating the effectiveness of global virtual collaboration as a teaching tool in management education. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 12(3), 414-435.

Webster, J., Wong, W. 2008. Comparing traditional and virtual group forms: Identity, communication and trust in naturally occurring project teams. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 19(1), 41-62.

Zakaria, N. 2008. Using computer mediated communication as a tool to facilitate intercultural collaboration of global virtual teams. In M. Pagani (ed.) Encyclopedia of Multimedia Technology and Networking, (1115-1123), 2. New York: Information Science Reference.

About the Guest Editors

Dr. Jiménez is Assistant Professor at the University of Burgos (Spain). His research interests are focused on the process and the determinants of success in the internationalization strategy of firms including political risk, cultural and psychic distance and corruption. In addition, he is also working on a research line devoted to virtual team and multi-cultural team management and dynamics. He has previously published several papers in several international relevant journals, including Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of World Business, Management International Review International Business Review and European Journal of International Management. He has also been a visiting scholar in different institutions in Australia, Norway, Italy, Germany, Ecuador and Mexico.

Dr. Dirk Boehe is Senior Lecturer at the University of Adelaide Business School (Australia). His research interests focus on multinational corporations, corporate social responsibility and corporate governance in emerging markets. His scholarly articles have appeared in The International Journal of Human Resource Management, Journal of Business Ethics, Journal of International Management, Journal of Small Business Management, Management International Review, Journal of World Business, World Development, Business and Society, Studies in Higher Education, among others. Before joining the University of Adelaide, he held full-time positions at Brazilian business schools. Before joining academia, Dirk gained professional experience in related areas such as market research, foreign trade and international consulting projects in Colombia, England, Germany and Venezuela.

Dr. Vasyl Taras is Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (United States). He has published several papers on culture and global virtual teams in leading International Business and Psychology journals such as Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of World Business, Journal of International Management, Academy of Management Learning and Education, International Journal of Human Resource Management and Management International Review. He is also Associate Editor of the International Journal of Cross Cultural Management and Editorial Review Board Member of Journal of International Business, Journal of International Management and Management Research Review. He has recently co-edited a book about Experiential Learning and has plenty of experience as a business consultant.

Dr. Dan Caprar is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Management of the UNSW Australia Business School. His research, teaching, and consulting work are in the area of cross-cultural management, leadership, and self-development. Dan has published several papers on culture and global virtual teams in top journals including Journal of International Business Studies, Academy of Management Learning and Education, Journal of Business Ethics, Personnel Psychology, and the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. In addition, his work on the culture of MNC local employees, published in the Journal of International Business Studies, was the runner-up for the Academy of Management HR Division Scholarly Achievement Award in 2011. Dan is currently a member of the Editorial Board for the Journal of International Business Studies and a Regional Associate Editor for the International Journal of Cross-Cultural Management.

International Business Research, a journal of Shanghai Institute of Foreign Trade, China and Asia and Globalization Review, a journal of MacEwan University, Canada, jointly announce a call for papers on Competition and Cooperation between China and Other Emerging Economies: Transnational Trade and Investment.

China has successfully fostered its robust economic growth in the past years, which has consolidated its status of world economic power. In the era of post-crisis, China is faced with challenges and competition from other emerging economies. How to tackle the issues of competition and cooperation between China and other emerging economies in the context of stagnated world economy and spreading financial crisis is worthy of special academic attention.

The call for papers seeks to deepen research, analysis and discussion of the issues of such challenges, competition and cooperation as China and other emerging economies are facing . We therefore call for papers that examine the environmental, social and economic effects of transnational trade and investment by China and other emerging economies.

We expect to publish the selected papers in the two journals. We are also organizing a conference in Shanghai on May 11, 2013, giving contributors of selected papers an opportunity to present and discuss their work.

The deadline for submitting the abstract for the papers is February 28, 2013. The notification of acceptance will be sent by March 30, 2013. The deadline for submitting the papers will be April 15, 2013.

Contacts:
Dr. JIN Xiaobai (shiftjournal@163.com)
Executive editor-in-chief, International Business Research; Associate professor of international law, Shanghai Institute of Foreign Trade, China

Dr. William X. Wei (weix@macewan.ca)
Editor-in-Chief, Asia and Globalization Review; Chair, Asia Pacific Management Program; Institute of Asia Pacific Studies, MacEwan School of Business, MacEwan University, Canada

Special Issue of the Competitiveness Review

“The Competitive Advantage of Nations: 25 Years After”

Christian Ketels (editor)

In 1990 Michael Porter published “The Competitive Advantage of Nations”, proposing a comprehensive framework to understand the competitiveness of locations.  The book triggered a rich academic debate; up to now, Google Scholar registers more than 35,000 citations. Numerous countries, regions, and clusters have launched efforts to upgrade their competitiveness, motivated by Porter’s work.

In this special issue we aim to collect two groups of papers, reflecting on the impact that the book had on theory and practice. First, we want to explore how the thinking on competitiveness has evolved over time. In the academic community there has been an on-going debate about the nature of the competitiveness concept, and the policy implications it might have. Twenty-five years after the Competitive Advantage of Nation was published, it is time to see where we have ended up so far. Second, we want to learn from a number of specific country and region cases in which Porter’s framework provided the foundation for specific diagnostics and policy action. Practitioners have been looking at Porter’s competitiveness framework as a way to organize their economic policies.  With the experience of these efforts over the last twenty-five years it is time to take stock and draw conclusions for policy practice going forward.

We are inviting a number of authors from academia and the policy community to this special issue. We also encourage submission from other authors, which will then go through the normal review process of the journal.

Submissions:

  1. Papers will be subject to double-blind peer review, according to author guidelines available at: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/cr.htm
  2. Submissions to Competitiveness Review are made using ScholarOne Manuscripts: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/comprev (please select the correct special issue from the drop-down menu)

Submission deadline : May 15th 2015

About the Editor:

Christian Ketels is a member of the Harvard Business School faculty where he serves as the Principal Associate of the Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness. He is the President of the TCI Network, the leading global network of practitioners in competitiveness, clusters and innovation. Together with Prof. Philippe Gugler, University of Fribourg and Chairman of the European International Business Academy (EIBA, he is the editor of the Competitiveness Review. Email: cketels@hbs.edu.

In terms both of its scale and severity, the worldwide financial crisis of 2007–2008 was the most damaging financial crisis to affect the world economy since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Many major financial institutions around the world collapsed or had to be bailed-out by governments. Global trade was also severely hit and a large number of national economies went into deep recessions. In the view of many economists and politicians, one of the main reasons why the fallout from the worldwide financial crisis of 2007–2008 proved to be so damaging was down to the fact that the global financial system had, in the years prior to the crisis, simply become too complex. This increased complexity, it is argued, proved to be especially damaging in the aftermath of the 2007–2008 crisis not only because it led to increased levels of contagion, but also because it made it more difficult for governments and regulators to intervene effectively.

This edited volume contributes to these ongoing debates by bringing together some of the top academics from the US and UK in the disciplines of Law, History and Economics to look in more depth at the historical and institutional aspects of the relationship between financial crises and systemic complexity. Conceptually, it is motivated by three main questions: 1) Is the present financial system more complex than in the past and, if so, why? 2) To what extent and in what ways does the worldwide financial crisis of 2007–2008 differ from past financial crises? 3) How can governments, regulators and businesses better manage and deal with increased levels of complexity both in the present and in the future?

It is the intention of the editors that this collection will not only encourage greater interdisciplinary debate, but also to be of use to policy-makers and legislators in their efforts to come up with more resilient ways of managing and dealing with increased levels of risk, both in the present and in the future. As such, we are particularly keen for contributions that deal with any of the following issues:

  • Directors’ duties and the role of shareholders in financial regulation
  • Government regulation, with a particular emphasis on moral hazard
  • The extent to which financial crises are an inevitable consequence of free-market banking systems
  • How changes in the size and scale of the US and UK banking sector have affected financial stability
  • The impact of economic fundamentals on financial instability, with a particular focus on speculative manias and investment bubbles
  • Differences in government responses to financial crises over time
  • The differences between legal and economic understandings of financial property and corporate control
  • Technological innovation and change, with a particular emphasis on changing payment and trading systems
  • ‘Short-termism’ and high-risk trading in financial markets
  • Transformations in the US and UK banking sector, particularly as regards the relationship between commercial and investment banking
  • The relationship between ownership structure and systemic crises
  • Changes in accounting practices and financial reporting procedures

The initial proposal for this edited volume has been already been officially accepted by Edward Elgar for publication in 2015 and confirmed confirmations have been accepted from a number of prominent academics in both the UK and the US. However, we still have a limited amount of space within which to fit a couple more contributions.

Submissions should be in the form of a 1–2 page chapter proposal (750 words max), clearly explaining the objective of the proposed chapter and the reasons why it is relevant to the issues covered in this collection. In addition, we also ask that all potential contributors submit a brief and up-to-date CV outlining their past work and previous achievements. The deadline for initial chapter proposals is 1 July 2013, but we both welcome and encourage potential contributors to submit before this date. All chapter proposals should be emailed in Word or PDF form to: matthew.hollow@durham.ac.uk

Special issue editors:

Madhu Viswanathan, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, mviswana@illinois.edu

Ronika Chakrabarti, Lancaster University, r.chakrabarti@lancaster.ac.uk

Paul Ingenbleek, Wageningen University, paul.ingenbleek@wur.nl

Srinivas Venugopal, University of Vermont, svenugop@uvm.edu

 

The Journal of Consumer Affairs (JCA) invites papers for a special issue on consumer affairs in subsistence marketplaces. Subsistence marketplaces consist of consumer and entrepreneur communities living at a range of low income levels, and are concentrated in developing countries and regions such as Brazil, India, China, Vietnam, and Sub-Saharan Africa. Additionally, many individuals in developed countries also live in subsistence. 

For more than a decade, the Subsistence Marketplaces Conferences have been a leading forum for evolving and sharing research and fostering best practices for improving quality of life in these communities. The subsistence marketplaces approach is unique in examining the intersection of poverty and marketplaces with a bottom-up approach that begins with micro-level understanding of life circumstances of consumers, entrepreneurs, and communities. This stream has been reflected in seven biennial conferences, one immersion conference [1],  and almost 60 refereed articles in related special journal issues (https://business.illinois.edu/subsistence/conferences/), as well as in dedicated session tracks at other conferences and refereed articles in a variety of journals. The current call flows from the Seventh Conference on Subsistence Marketplaces, held in June 2018, but is also open to authors who did not attend this conference.

The conferences cover themes from consumption and entrepreneurship beyond literacy and resource barriers to consumption and commerce for a better world, impactful research to sustainable innovation, micro-level insights to macro-level impact, spanning geographies and substantive domains, and developing pathways at the intersection of research and practice. 

Encouraging scholarship on subsistence marketplaces addresses one of the most critical and enduring ethical challenges faced by society - that of global poverty. A central theme is how to increase quality of life for people living in subsistence marketplaces. Research on subsistence marketplaces holds the potential to uncover important insights on how poverty intersects with major societal trends of today such as climate change, refugee crises, income inequality and rapid technological advancements. Obtaining deep understanding of these issues will be crucial to advancing well-being in subsistence contexts. 

The following are suggestions for topics; however, submissions may go beyond these topics.

  • Consumer behavior in subsistence marketplaces;
  • Substantive domains of subsistence (e.g., water, sanitation, energy, food);
  • Powerlessness of consumers in subsistence marketplaces;
  • Access to innovation and consumer products in impoverished rural areas;
  • Interventions to increase quality of life in subsistence marketplaces;
  • Environmentalism of subsistence consumers and consumer-merchants;
  • Issues of environmental justice relating to subsistence marketplaces;
  • Pricing for value and sustainability;
  • Economic and financial perspectives on subsistence marketplaces (e.g., financial literacy);
  • Health, well-being, and justice in subsistence marketplaces;
  • Research methods for subsistence marketplaces.

Researchers in all relevant fields are encouraged to submit their work. Manuscripts may be submitted online through Scholar One Manuscripts. Style guidelines and publishing requirements can be viewed online at wileyonlinelibray.com/journal/JOCA. Please contact the issue editors or the Journal office [ronhill@american.edu] for further information.

Editors

Dr. Mehmet Ali TURKMENOGLU (Assist. Prof.) (PhD from Brunel University London) 
Muş Alparslan Üniversitesi Kampusu, IIBF Ofis No 306, Diyarbakır Yolu 7. Km 49250- Muş/TURKEY 
Email: dr.mturkmenoglu@gmail.com

Dr. Berat CICEK (Assist. Prof) 
Muş Alparslan Üniversitesi Kampusu, IIBF Ofis No 302, Diyarbakır Yolu 7. Km 49250- Muş/TURKEY 
Email: beratcicek@gmail.com

Dates

Proposals Submission Deadline: June 15, 2019
Full Chapters Due: October 13, 2019
Submission Date: March 4, 2020

Introduction

Over the last few decades, rapid changes have affected organizations' perspectives about employees. One change could be globalisation which caused a tough competition for enterprises. This competition has forced organisations to change the way of doing business which also affected people's expectations from organizations. Other changes include technological, societal, demographical, political, legal, and cultural transformations. These changes have raised awareness of paying attention to the importance of valuing human resources among employers and employees. Therefore, human resources researches have been attractive to business and academic environments to solve problems at work. For instance, globalisation has enabled employees to migrate to other countries and this situation caused to work in a culturally different work environment. Migrating to other countries has created both positive and negative consequences e.g. employers have obtained the talented employees they required and employees have reached to the desired labour market. Employers and employees have benefited from technological developments immensely. But also, it is argued that technology has deteriorated human relations. Ageing has become a major issue for employers rapid changing environment, especially adapting new changes, decreased performance and absenteeism. Opposed to ageing issues, having a rising and modernised education level created opportunities for finding better employees and employers. 
Political and legal changes e.g. minimum wage, maximum working hours and union rights have guaranteed employees' working conditions and rights. In this context, researches of the human resources have concentrated on employees' work-related as well as personal life issues. This book is intended to cover current and future changes, issues, solutions of human resources management from an improving, critical, innovative and contemporary standpoint.

Objective

This book aims to examine attitudes, behaviours, experience, expectations of employees and employers about HR Management in a rapidly changing business environment. In this context, we would like to contribute to the field by shedding light on current trends of Human Resources functions e.g. planning, recruiting, orienting, developing and training and appraising of employees as well as managing industrial relations. In order to meet this aim, we invite authors to focus on especially workplace issues that employees encounter before, during and after employment e.g. discrimination, bullying, conflicts, emotions, ethics, participation and work-life balance. We expect that this book will not only expand the literature but also increase awareness among practitioners. Due to the rising trends such as intellectual capital and talent management, employees are considered more valuable to organizations. Thus, we expect related to mentioned HR issues with an interdisciplinary and critically point of view.

Target Audience

The potential audience will include but not limited to: 
Graduate students, 
PhD Candidates, 
Researchers, 
Business Community, 
Academia, 
Practitioners of profit and non-profit organizations, 
Policymakers

Recommended Topics

Topics below are encouraged for authors to cover but it is not limited to: 
Main Topics 
- Human resources management in a competitive environment with advantages and disadvantages 
- Effects of globalization on human resource management issues 
- Demographic changes and societal transformations & HR Management 
- Critiques of HR Practices 
- Legal and political changes & HR Management 
- Technological developments in HR Management 

Sub Topics related to HR Management 
- Ageing issues 
- Diversity issues 
- Work-life Balance Issues 
- Recruitment Issues 
- Orientation Issues 
- Training and Development Issues 
- Performance Appraisal Issues 
- Downsizing Issues 
- Industrial Relations Issues 
- Ethical Issues 
- Migrant Employment Issues 
- Bullying

Submission Procedure

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before June 15, 2019, a chapter proposal of 1,000 to 2,000 words clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Authors will be notified by July15, 2019 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by October 13, 2019, and all interested authors must consult the guidelines for manuscript submissions at http://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project. 

Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this book publication, Trust in Knowledge Management and Systems in Organizations. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process. 

All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery®TM online submission manager.

Publisher

This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the "Information Science Reference" (formerly Idea Group Reference), "Medical Information Science Reference," "Business Science Reference," and "Engineering Science Reference" imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com

This publication is anticipated to be released in 2020.

Important Dates

June 22, 2019: Proposal Submission Deadline 
July 15, 2019: Notification of Acceptance 
October 13, 2019: Full Chapter Submission 
November 22, 2019: Review Results Returned 
December 27, 2019: Final Acceptance Notification 
February 21, 2020: Final Chapter Submission

Inquiries

Dr. Mehmet Ali TURKMENOGLU (Assist. Prof.) (PhD from Brunel University London) 
Email: dr.mturkmenoglu@gmail.com

Dr. Berat CICEK (Assist. Prof) 
Email: beratcicek@gmail.com

Propose a chapter for this book

Contextualizing international business research to achieve research rigor and practical relevance is a challenge faced by all sub-disciplines within the domain of international business.  Contextualizing international business research focuses on the big question, 'How do we identify and integrate context into our international business research?' and a corollary, 'Why should we identify and integrate context into our international business research?' We seek submissions for this special issue that explore the implications of context for IB theory building, research design and methodology including methodological approaches to build more robust IB theories; articles that focus on the conceptualization and meaning of context; and limitations of contextualization. Additionally, submissions that demonstrate novel methodological approaches for integrating context into IB theory building are welcome.

When the renowned international business scholar Peter Buckley (2002) questioned the distinctiveness of IB research, he responded to his own question and argued for more integration of culture, more use of comparative studies and of distinctive methods in IB research. Many argue contextual dimensions are what differentiate domestic research from international business and international management research (Buckley, 2002; Child, 2009; Oesterle & Wolf, 2011). Oesterle and Wolf (2011) raised the question, 'how international are our international journals?'  And concluded that context was not adequately or at best modestly addressed in most of our research. We concur.

Despite the urging of thought leaders in IB for more contextualization, our approaches to contextualization appear limited, for example, focusing on categorical data or concepts like country or nationality (Von Glinow & Shenkar, 1994).  They are static since our methods do not appear to be changing despite calls to do so (Buckley, 2002; Child, 2009; Teagarden, et al. 1995). Perhaps, most importantly, the scope of IB is expanding dramatically and our research contextualization appears inadequate, given the shift in business from the United States and Europe toward more 'exotic' emerging markets in Asia, Latin America and Africa with more pronounced differences in business and cultural environments.  For our IB research to remain relevant we must more adequately contextualize our theory building. 

Contextualization has been viewed through many lenses, and at multiple levels of analysis. While focusing on theory building, Whetten (2009) and Tsui (2004) differentiate context-specific and context-bound theory development, and Child (2009) discusses an 'outside in' versus 'inside out' perspective of contextualization. Von Glinow, Shapiro and Brett (2004) and Shapiro, Von Glinow and Xiao (2007) suggest a more complex perspective when they contrast 'single contextuality' with 'polycontextuality' or the multiple and qualitatively different contexts embedded within one another.  Each of these studies acknowledges that context is important in IB theory building and each offer prescriptive recommendations for incorporating context.

Strategists (Ricart et al., 2004, Rugman & Verbeke, 2001) and behaviorists (Rousseau & Fried, 2001; Gelfend, Erez & Aycan, 2007) assert that location, one form of context, has an impact on theory. Khanna (2002) explores institutions and institutional voids in locations. Ghemawat (2001, 2003) examines country differences and offers the CAGE (Culture, Administrative, Geographic and Economic) framework to guide analysis.  Ghemawat (2007) argues that despite globalization, there are significant locational differences that must be considered. Cheng (1994) suggests that context-embedded research ought to include '…a nation's social, cultural, legal, and economic variables as predictors and organizational attributes as dependent variables. Enright (2002) urges the use of multilevel analysis including supranational, macro, meso, micro and firm levels in the integration of location into competitive strategy.  House and colleagues (2004) in their seminal GLOBE study discuss societies and their impact on leadership.  Von Glinow and colleagues (2002 a, 2002 b) identify locational influences on human resource management best practices as do Von Glinow & Teagarden (1988, 1990).  Shapiro and colleagues (2007) identify numerous contextual variables, including location, that address the multiple and qualitatively different contextual variables that influence understanding behavior in China.

Given the magnitude of possible contexts, researchers are challenged to comprehend the contextual and polycontextual dynamics in a limited number of foreign cultures. Tsui (2004) argues for inside-out, context specific indigenous research, and this represents one possible solution to the context challenge. Teagarden and Schotter (2013) and Enright (20020 argue for the importance of multilevel analysis to contextualize research and provide a deeper understanding of phenomena.  Teagarden and colleagues (1995) suggest that team-based comparative-management studies provide the collective understanding to contextualize and make sense of multiple contexts in a single research project.  There have been numerous examples that demonstrate the effectiveness of this latter approach (House, et al., 2004; Von Glinow, Teagarden & Drost, 2002a, 2002b).

The list of topics below is merely suggestive of the range of topics appropriate for the Special Issue, which ideally seeks inputs from scholars across a number of disciplines related to conducting research on organizational, institutional and environmental contexts. Through contributions to this special issue, we aspire to expand the boundaries of rigor and relevance in international business research.

Contributors are invited to submit manuscripts focus on topics and themes such as:

  • How important is context to conducting International Business research?
  • What are the various methodological approaches used to measure context?
  • Is national culture an accurate reflection of context; if not, what other contextual variables better capture the notion of context?
  • Do traditional measures of political, institutional, and governance capture important contextual conditions; if not, how are they incomplete and what additional constructs are required to supplement them? 
  • How does indigenous research help us uncover multiple contexts?
  • What is context-embedded research, and why is it important?
  • What role do institutions and institutional voids play in establishing context in International Business research?
  • How does the use (or abuse) of context affect rigor or relevance in our theory development?
  • How does the use of context help us expand theory in International Business?
  • What research methods are most appropriate to uncovering the different and multiple contexts that underlie most international settings?

Submission process:

By 01 November, 2015, authors should submit their manuscripts online via the new Journal of World Business EES submission system. The link for submitting manuscript is: http://ees.elsevier.com/jwb. 

To ensure that all manuscripts are correctly identified for consideration for this Special Issue, it is important that authors select ‘SI: Contextualizing Research’ when they reach the “Article Type” step in the submission process

Manuscripts should be prepared in accordance with the Journal of World Business Guide for Authors available at http://www.elsevier.com/journals/journal-of-world-business/1090-9516/guide-for-authors. All submitted manuscripts will be subject to the Journal of World Business’s blind review process.

We may organize a workshop designed to facilitate the development of papers. Authors of manuscripts that have progressed through the revision process will be invited to it. Presentation at the workshop is neither a requirement for nor a promise of final acceptance of the paper in the Special Issue.

Questions about the Special Issue may be directed to the guest editors:

Mary B. Teagarden, Thunderbird School of Management, Arizona State University, USA (mary.teagarden@asu.edu)

Mary Ann Von Glinow, Florida International University, USA (vonglino@fiu.edu

References:

Buckley, P.J. (2002) 'Is the international business research agenda running out of steam?', Journal of International Business Studies, 33(2): 365-373.

Cheng, J.L.C. (1994) 'On the concept of universal knowledge in organization science: implications for cross-national research', Management Science, 40: 162-168.

Child, J. (2009) 'Context, Comparison, and methodology in Chinese Management Research', Management and Organization Review, 5(1): 57-73.

Enright, M.J. (2002) 'Globalization, regionalization, and the knowledge-based economy in Hong Kong.  In J.H. Dunning (ed.) Regions, Globalization and the Knowledge-based Economy, Oxford University Press: Oxford, pp. 381-406.

Gelfend, M.J., Erez, M.and Aycan, Z. (2007) 'Cross-cultural organizational behavior', Annual Review of Psychology, 58: 479-514.

Ghemawat, P. (2001) 'Distance still matters', Harvard Business Review, 79(8), September: 137-147.

Ghemawat, P. (2003) 'Semiglobalization and international business strategy', Journal of International Business Studies, 34(2): 138-152.

Ghemawat, P. (2007) 'Why the world isn't flat', Foreign Policy, March-April: 54-60.

House, R. J., Hanges, P.J., Javidan, M., Dorfman, P.W. and Gupta, V. (2004) Culture, Leadership and Organizations: The GLOBE Study of 62 Societies. Sage.

Khanna, T. (2000) Local Institutions and Global Strategy, Harvard Business School: Boston, Harvard Business School Note No. 702-475.

Oesterle, M.J. and Wolf, J.M. (2011) '50 years of MIR and IB/IM research; an inventory and some suggestions for the fields development', Management International Review, 51: 735-757.

Ricart, J.E., Enright, M.J., Ghemawat, P., Hart, S.L., and Khanna, T. (2004) 'New frontiers in international strategy', Journal of International Business Studies, 35: 175-200.

Rousseau, D.M. and Fried, Y. (2001) 'Location, location, location: contextualizing organizational research', Journal of Organizational Behavior, 22: 1-13.

Rugman, A.M. and Verbeke, A. (2001) 'Subsidiary-specific advantages in multinational enterprises', Strategic Management Journal, 23(3): 237-250.

Shapiro, D.L., Von Glinow, M.A. and Xiao Z. (2007) 'Toward polycontextually sensitive research methods', Management and Organization Review, 3(1): 129-152.

Shenkar, O. and Von Glinow, M.A. (1994) 'Paradoxes of organizational theory and research: using the case of China to illustrate national contingency', Management Science, 40: 56-71.

Teagarden, M.B. and Schotter, A. (2013) 'Favor prevalence in emerging markets: a multi-level analysis of social capital', Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 30(2): 447-460.

Teagarden, M.B., M.A. Von Glinow, D. Bowen, C. Frayne, S. Nason, P. Huo, J. Milliman, M.C. Butler, M.E. Arias, N.H. Kim, H. Scullion and K.B. Lowe (1995). 'Toward building a theory of comparative management research methodology: An idiographic case study of the best international human resources management project', Academy of Management Journal, 38(5): 1261-1287.

Tsui, A.S. (2004) 'Contributing to global management knowledge: a case for high quality indigenous research', Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 21: 491-513.

Von Glinow, M.A. and Teagarden, M.B. (2009) 'The future of Chinese management research: rigor and relevance redux', Management and Organization Review, 5(1): 75-89.

Von Glinow, M.A. and Teagarden M.B. (1990). 'Contextual determinants of human resource management effectiveness in international cooperative alliances: evidence from the People's Republic of China',  International Human Resource Management Review, 1: 75-93.

Von Glinow, M.A. and Teagarden M.B. (1988). 'The transfer of human resource management technology in Sino-U.S. cooperative ventures: problems and solutions', Human Resource Management, 27(2), Summer: 201-229.

Von Glinow, M.A, Teagarden, M.B. and Drost E. (2002a). 'Converging on IHRM best practices: lessons learned from a globally-distributed consortium on theory and practice', Human Resource Management, Special Issue, 41(1): 123-140.

Von Glinow, M.A, Teagarden, M.B. and Drost E. (2002b). 'Converging on IHRM best practices: lessons learned from a globally-distributed consortium on theory and practice', Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resource Management, Special Issue, 40 (1): 123-140.

Whetten, D. (2009) 'An examination between context and theory applied to the study of organizations in China', Management and Organization Review, 5(1): 29-55.

Guest Editors:

Crystal Jiang Ph.D., Bryant University, cjiang1@bryant.edu

Irem Demirkan Ph.D., Loyola University Maryland, idemirkan@loyola.edu

Qin Yang Ph.D., Robert Morris University, yang@rmu.edu

Submission deadline: September 15, 2017

Special Issue Theme Background

This New England Journal of Entrepreneurship (NEJE) special issue on ‘Corporate Entrepreneurship in Emerging Markets’ aims to explore key features of the corporate entrepreneurship in emerging economies.

It is widely accepted in the literature that corporate entrepreneurship encompasses two main phenomena of innovation and venturing (Yiu & Lau, 2008). While innovation refers to introduction of new products and production processes for improved firm performance, the focus on venturing is the creation of new businesses.

Corporate entrepreneurship can be a necessary driver for economic growth, new sources of employment, and an important source for reducing economic disparity. Contextual factors and social mechanisms are very important for entrepreneurship (Antio, Kenney, Mustar, Siegel & Wright, 2014; van Burg & Romme, 2014). For instance, firms’ corporate entrepreneurship interplays with government institutions (Holmes, Zahra, Hoskisson, DeGhetto & Sutton, 2016). However, studies focusing on corporate entrepreneurship, specifically those look into the roles of innovation and new venture creation have been neglected in emerging economies nations. Although corporate entrepreneurship can make a big difference in the firm competitiveness of emerging markets (Bruton, Ahlstrom & Obloj, 2008; Guo, Jiang, & Yang, 2014), the literature is still lacking in exploring the dynamics of corporate entrepreneurship in these contexts (e.g., De Clercq, Danis & Dakhli, 2010; Kiss, Danis & Cavusgil, 2012).

Emerging markets are defined as low-income, rapid-growth countries where government policies encourage economic liberalization. Emerging markets includes 51 developing countries in Asia, Latin America, Africa, and the Middle East and 13 transition economies (Hoskisson, Eden, Lau, & Wright, 2000). Emerging markets offer not only market potential but also a competitive advantage of their own as they become increasingly integrated into the global economy. Moreover during the last decade, emerging markets have assumed a prominent position in the global economy and they account for more than half of world GDP (IMF). Owning to their weak legal environment and resource deficiency, emerging market firms have been found to access to all possible sources of competitive strength (Contractor, 2013) and exploit unique firm-specific advantages for corporate entrepreneurship activities (Jiang, Yang, Song, & Annavarjula, 2016; Kotabe, Jiang, & Murray, 2016;  Luo & Rui, 2010). Therefore, the need to open up the issue of corporate entrepreneurship as a significant source of firm competitiveness in these economies will fill an important void not only in corporate entrepreneurship, but also in emerging market management literatures.

Overall, the guest editors hope that the NEJE special issue will contribute to establishing the groundwork for corporate entrepreneurship in emerging markets that potentially inform both management research and practice for the future.

Potential Research Questions

The following list of research questions is neither intended to be exhaustive nor complete.

  • How does unique setting of emerging markets foster corporate entrepreneurship?
  • What are the processes of corporate entrepreneurship of firms in emerging markets?
  • How do technological forces drive the process of innovation in emerging markets?
  • What are the implications of government involvement in emerging markets on corporate entrepreneurship? How can firms from emerging markets create and protect their propriety technologies while competing globally?
  • How can firms from emerging markets benefit from the pursuit of corporate entrepreneurship?
  • Do firm characteristics matter in the pursuit of its corporate entrepreneurship from emerging markets including but not limited to firm size, firm age, industry, geographical locations, and among others? Do differences in ownership (ex. State owned enterprises, family businesses, business groups) common to emerging markets matter in pursuit of corporate entrepreneurship?
  • Does internationalization of firms from emerging markets stimulate corporate entrepreneurship? Why and how?
  • Are multinational corporations operating in emerging markets in a more favorable position than local firms in the pursuit of corporate entrepreneurship?
  • Compared with developed economies, does the nature of corporate entrepreneurship change in some way in emerging economies?

Questions about the special issue may be directed to any of the guest editors: Crystal Jiang (cjiang1@bryant.edu), Irem Demirkan (idemirkan@loyola.edu), and Qin Yang (yang@rmu.edu).

Notes for Prospective Authors:

Submitted papers should not have been previously published nor be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere.

All papers are refereed through a double-blind rigorous developmental peer review process.

All papers must be submitted online. Submission guidelines are available at http://digitalcommons.sacredheart.edu/neje/policies.html.

Important Dates:

Submission of manuscripts: September 15, 2017

Notification to authors: November 15, 2017

Final versions due: January 31, 2018

Publication date: Spring, 2018

References:

Autio, E., Kenney, M., Mustar, P., Siegel, D., & Wright, M. (2014). Entrepreneurial innovation: The importance of context, Research Policy, 43(7), 1097-1108.

Bruton, G., Ahlstrom, D., & Obloj, K. (2008). Entrepreneurship in emerging economics: where are we today and where should the research go in the future? Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 32(1), 1-14.

Contractor, F.  (2013). “Punching above their weight”: The sources of competitive advantage for emerging market multinationals, International Journal of Emerging Markets, 8(4), 304-328.

De Clercq, D., Danis, W., & Dakhli, M. (2010). The moderating effect of institutional context on the relationship between associational activity and new business activity in emerging economies, International Business Review, 19(1), 85-101.

Guo, C., Jiang, C., Yang, Q. (2014). The development of organizational capabilities and corporate entrepreneurial processes: The case of Chinese automobile firms. Thunderbird International Business Review, 56(6): 483-500.

Holmes, R.M., Zahra, S.A., & Hoskisson, R.E. (2016). Two-way streets:Tthe role of institutions and technology policy in firms’ corporate entrepreneurship and political strategies, Academy of Management Perspectives, 30(3), 247-272.

Hoskisson, R.E., Eden, L., Lau, C.M., & Wright, M. (2000). Strategy in emerging economies. Academy of Management Journal, 43, 249-267.

Jiang,C., Yang, Q., Song, S., Annavarjula, M. (2016). Emerging market firms’ catch-up strategy in new product development: Cases from Chinese companies. International Journal of Business and Emerging Markets, 8(3): 324-339.

Kiss, A., Danis, W., & Cavusgil, S. (2012). International entrepreneurship research in emerging economies: A critical review and research agenda, Journal of Business Venturing, 27(2), 266-290.

Kotabe, M., Jiang, C., & Murray, J. (forthcoming). Examining the complementary effect of political networking capability with absorptive capacity on the innovative performance of emerging-market firms. Journal of Management (online available).

Luo, Y., & Rui, H. (2010). An ambidexterity perspective toward multinational enterprises from emerging economies. Academy of Management Perspectives, 23(4), 49-70.

Van Burg, E., & Romme, A. (2014). Creating the future together: Toward a framework for research synthesis in entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurship Theory & Practice, 38(2), 369-397.

Yiu, D., & Lau, C.M. (2008). Corporate entrepreneurship as resource capital configuration in emerging market firms. Entrepreneurship Theory & Practice, 32, 37-58.

OVERVIEW: The objective of this Special Issue is to address theoretical and empirical gaps in prior Finance and International Business (IB) studies associated with corporate governance problems and the effectiveness of governance solutions in the context of multi-national enterprises (MNEs).  The last decade has witnessed significant growth in both policy and research devoted to the corporate governance of MNEs.  While IB and corporate finance research continue to evaluate the challenges facing MNEs in foreign product and capital markets, scholars have yet to adequately address the underlying corporate governance challenges, especially when MNEs operate in different industry and formal regulatory and informal normative and cultural institutional contexts.  We invite submissions with a focus on the complex interface between firm-level governance mechanisms and diverse institutional contexts, including legal, economic, cultural and political institutions, that have a profound impact on various organizational outcomes of MNEs, such as capital structure, global business strategy including, for example, cross-border M&As, non-market strategies, and performance.  This Special Issue will attempt to extend our understanding of governance issues in MNEs to embrace corporate finance, strategy and knowledge dimensions together with contextual issues related to national and global institutions.

TOPICS: The Special Issue welcomes both theoretical and empirical papers.  Topics for the Special Issue can include, but are not limited to:            

  • The role of institutions and national business systems in corporate governance of MNEs.
  • Complementarities and substitution among governance mechanisms at the firm-, industry- and macro-levels.
  • Ownership and control structures in MNEs and their impact on global strategy and performance.
  • Institutional voids and governance in global business groups, especially in emerging markets.
  • The family-centric governance model in MNEs and its organizational effects.
  • The governance role of global financial institutions and institutional investors including private equity and sovereign wealth funds (SWFs).
  • The role of political connections and business networks in governance of emerging market MNEs.
  • Executive incentives and their performance outcomes in the global business context.
  • The role of informal institutions in the governance of MNEs, including normative, cognitive and cultural aspects.
  • The inter-relationships between governance, institutions and the capital raising strategies of MNEs.
  • The influence of legal and regulatory institutions on the governance of MNEs.
  • Institutions, governance, and non-market strategies of MNEs.
  • The influence of institutions and industry context on the balance between monitoring, strategic and legitimacy roles of governance in the MNE context.
  • The governance aspects of MNEs’ global networks. The headquarter-subsidiary governance relationships.
  • The impact of competition in both product and capital markets on governance of MNEs.
  • The interactive effects of institutions and the external governance of third party “gatekeepers” (e.g., stock market analysis, bank-underwriters etc.) on MNE outcomes.

PAPER SUBMISSION PROCEDURE:  Authors are asked to submit a full article by February 27, 2017. All submissions must adhere to the Journal of Corporate Finance editorial guidelines (http://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-corporate-finance/). The papers will be screened initially by Special Issue’s Editors. The short-listed papers will go through the JCF regular review process according to standard journal policy. The first round of reviews will be followed by a paper development conference that will be held at the University of Georgia campus in Atlanta, Georgia (USA) on August 2-3, 2017.  Acceptance to the conference does not guarantee acceptance into the Special Issue.

DEADLINE: February 27, 2017  

Notification of acceptance to Special Issue conference

May 29, 2017

Special Issue conference

Atlanta, Georgia USA, August 2-3, 2017

Special Issue resubmission deadline

October 1, 2017

Notification of acceptance to Special Issue

December 2017

There is growing interest among scholars concerning the managerial implications of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and related areas such as firm sustainability. Because of the rise in consumer, investor, supplier, and worker demands for CSR, managers have begun to ask important questions regarding how to manage these activities and how to allocate resources to them. All of this has led to a strong organizational and community demand for research on CSR-related topics such as environmental responsibility, sustainability, and the appropriate management of stakeholders (including employee relations issues). In addition, practitioners seek knowledge that can be used to better manage employees in organizational settings vis-à-vis CSR.

Despite increasing attention, CSR research is still in an embryonic stage, with critical issues regarding frameworks and empirical methods yet to be resolved. Furthermore, much of the research to date has largely involved a macro level of analysis, focusing on such issues as understanding the relationship between CSR and the financial performance of firms. To achieve a more complete perspective on CSR, however, theory and research will need to address more micro-level human resource management and organizational behavior issues. As such, the primary goal of this special issue is to serve as a catalyst for scholarly work on CSR that expands the domain from an exclusive focus on the macro level of analysis to an inclusive focus that incorporates issues more directly related to human resource management and organizational behavior.

Original empirical research, theory development, meta-analytic reviews, and narrative literature reviews are all potentially appropriate for inclusion in the special issue. A number of topic areas that are commonly addressed by Personnel Psychology are potentially relevant to CSR issues. Some research questions that might be addressed in this special issue include (but are not limited to):

  • How is CSR related to leadership and the characteristics of top executives?
  • Can human resource management or organizational behavior offer innovative approaches to the study or measurement of CSR?
  • How are ethical decision-making processes related to CSR endeavors?
  • What implications do traditional human resource systems (e.g., selection, training, performance management, work design) have for effective adoption or implementation of CSR?
  • What is the relationship between organizational culture/climate and CSR?
  • Can CSR have an effect on employee identity?
  • Is it appropriate for job analysis, recruitment, selection, appraisal, reward, and training processes to take into account CSR, and if so, how might such processes be designed?
  • How does CSR affect employee-based indicators of effectiveness, such as absenteeism or turnover rates?
  • What is the relationship between CSR and international human resource management?
  • What are the effects of programs whereby employees engage in community service activities while receiving compensation from their firms?
  • Is there a relationship between diversity and CSR?
  • What are the implications of CSR for strategic human resource management?
  • How do CSR policies or practices relate to employee work attitudes or morale?

Submission Process and Timeline
To be considered for the special issue, manuscripts must be submitted no later than December 31, 2011, U.S. Eastern Standard Time. Papers may be submitted prior to this deadline as well. Submitted papers will undergo a double-blind review process and will be evaluated by at least two reviewers and a special issue editor. Final acceptance is contingent on the review team’s judgments of the paper’s contribution on four key dimensions:

  1. Theoretical contribution: Does the article offer new and innovative ideas and insights or meaningfully extend existing theory?
  2. Empirical contribution: Does the article offer new and unique findings and is the study design, data analysis, and results rigorous and appropriate in testing the hypotheses or research questions?
  3. Practical contribution: Does the article contribute to the improved management of people in organizations?
  4. Contribution to the special issue topic.

Authors should prepare their manuscripts for blind review according to the directions provided in the 2010 Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Be sure to remove any information that may potentially reveal the identity of the authors to the review team.

Manuscripts should be submitted electronically at:
http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ppsych

One notable feature of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is its fundamentally contested and socially constructed nature. While CSR has been typically seen in terms of voluntary and firmspecific phenomena in prior research, what constitutes responsible or irresponsible corporate behaviour depends very much on the wider institutional setting and how it defines and regulates legitimate corporate action. Corporations are embedded in wider societal and political arrangements and participate in local, national, and transnational polities. While CSR research widely acknowledges the importance of stakeholder salience and institutional context in shaping CSR, the role of institutions and processes of institutional change for CSR has remained under-explored. A second, less studied, aspect of the comparative, and therefore collective, character of CSR concerns the importance of norms, conventions, and expectations of appropriate conduct that originate outside of firms’ organisational field. Such norms and standards of behaviour often relate to differences between countries in formal regulatory institutions or in normative or cultural conventions regarding business conduct.

Researchers have recently shown particular interest in the intersection of CSR and institutional theory (Aguilera & Jackson, 2003; Campbell, 2006; Matten & Moon, 2008). The study of institutions brings light to how responsible and irresponsible behaviour of corporations is framed by wider social and political frames. Apart from mapping out new conceptual space in the understanding of CSR, an institutional perspective beyond the immediate organisational fields of individual companies has recently generated interest through the developments in the world economy in the late 2000s. The so-called ‘financial crisis’ has not only surfaced novel forms of corporate irresponsibility but in fact has unmasked the pivotal role of private corporations for a host of issues hitherto seen as core expectations on governments. The institutional embeddedness and governance mechanisms with which business and societies are mutually interdependent have given rise to novel ways of thinking not only about CSR, but in fact about the role of the institution of the modern (global) corporation Crouch, 2004, 2009).

While institutions shape how firms respond to a variety of social and environmental issues, research has shown that companies are not passive actors in processes of institutional entrepreneurship and development, particularly in contexts characterised by weak, underdeveloped, or unenforced institutional arrangements. The presence of such ‘institutional voids’ presents particular opportunities and challenges for understanding and enacting corporate responsibilities.

Multinational companies face particular difficulties in developing and implementing approaches to the management of their social responsibilities when operating across diverse institutional environments.

The goals of this Special Issue are to (a) stimulate innovative research on the social and political embeddedness of CSR within a variety of local, sectoral, national, and international settings; (b) develop conceptual tools for understanding the intersection of CSR with regulatory institutions, as well as diverse institutions of economic governance or “varieties of capitalism”; and (c) advance our understanding of CSR as a process of governance, whereby responsible and irresponsible behaviour is socially defined, contested, and sanctioned by various stakeholders with different degrees of power and influence over corporate decision-making. We invite theoretical and empirical papers from a variety of traditions in thinking about and studying institutions. The following is a list of indicative, but not exhaustive, topic areas:

  • CSR in cross-national comparison: institutional diversity and CSR; varieties of capitalism and corporate responsibility; implicit vs. explicit forms of CSR
  • CSR and state regulation: the implications of liberal or interventionist forms of state intervention for defining the social space of CSR; framing of CSR in the context of different forms of statehood; CSR as a substitute for formal regulation; the role of CSR within “institutional voids” or areas of limited statehood
  • Diffusion of CSR: understanding the spread and form of CSR initiatives; regulative, normative, and mimetic forms of isomorphism
  • Standard setting: standard setting with regard to social, environmental or governance standards; use of social branding and labeling; regulation of social and environmental disclosure
  • Stakeholder power and influence: local actor constellations and power dynamics; the role of unions in implementing CSR initiatives; forms of influence by NGOs, media, or other civil society actors
  • Reputation as a governance mechanism: role of responsible and irresponsible behavior in shaping reputation;
  • Historical perspectives on CSR: origins of CSR in different countries or sectors; long-term changes in the relationship between the state, civil society and corporations.

Submissions
Socio-Economic Review (SER) aims to encourage work on the relationship between society, economy, institutions and markets, moral commitments and the rational pursuit of self-interest. The journal seeks articles that focus on economic action in its social and historical context. In broad disciplinary terms, papers are drawn from sociology, political science, economics and the management and policy sciences. The journal encourages papers that seek to recombine disciplinary domains in response to practically relevant issues, while at the same time encouraging the
development of new theory.

Papers should be submitted by email to Gregory Jackson (email: gregory.jackson@fu-berlin.de). Please prepare manuscripts according to the guidelines shown at ser.oxfordjournals.org. The
maximum length of articles including references, notes and abstract is 10,000, and the minimum length is 6,000 words. Articles must be accompanied by an abstract of no more than 150 words. The main document has to be anonymous and should contain title, abstract, and strictly avoid selfreferences. Papers will be reviewed following the journal’s normal review process and criteria. Papers accepted into the revision stage will be presented and discussed with the Guest Editors at a workshop which will be organized in conjunction with the SASE annual conference on June 23-25, 2010 held at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain (for details, see www.sase.org).

For further information please contact any of the Guest Editors for this Special Issue:

Steve Brammer: mnssjab@management.bath.ac.uk
Gregory Jackson: gregory.jackson@fu-berlin.de
Dirk Matten: dmatten@schulich.yorku.ca

Special issue call for papers from International Marketing Review

Guest Editors

Pervez N. Ghauri, King’s College London, United Kingdom
Byung Il Park, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, South Korea
Chang Hoon Oh, Simon Fraser University, Canada

Purpose and Research Questions

Despite the recent economic slump and subsequent fluctuations of development activities in some markets, the general trend of economic growth around the globe has continuously shown upward movement over the last three decades. Along with the improvement in the quality of life, consumers are paying more attention to ethical and philanthropic activities of Multinational Enterprises (MNEs). Due to this phenomenon, corporate social responsibility (CSR) research is growing in importance. Scholarly evidence increasingly confirms that CSR activities are beneficial for corporate success (e.g., Orlitzky et al., 2003; Waddock and Graves, 1997). We presume that this is probably because consistent CSR activities induce a corporation's image enhancement, which subsequently results in consumer's trust in its products (Turker, 2009). Taken together, there is a general consensus that CSR is often considered as a key factor significantly influencing market image and corporate success at home as well as in international markets.

Reflecting the trend discussed above, scholars and business practitioners perceive CSR as an integral part of marketing strategy. In addition, in order to maximize shareholder wealth by carrying out actions that increase business profit, various stakeholders also need to be convinced that the company is a good citizen in the society (Freeman, 1984). Meanwhile, it should be noted that among all the stakeholders, one important group that appears to be particularly influential for firms to initiate CSR activities is consumers (Du, Bhattacharya and Sen, 2010). Considering the globalization of the markets, companies need to create a positive image in all international markets. However, a thorough review of the literature indicates that most studies exploring CSR are concentrated only on Domestic Marketing (e.g., the impact of CSR on consumer loyalty in the local markets) (see e.g., Adams, Licht and Sagiv, 2011; Muller and Kräussl, 2011; Luo and Bhattacharya, 2006; Lai et al., 2010), which clearly indicates that CSR research tends to have an implied domestic marketing bias and very little research into CSR issues has considered CSR’s international marketing implications.

CSR activities can also be used as a valuable international marketing strategy. For instance, some studies in International Marketing suggest that CSR by international marketers will significantly improve their national and corporate brands in developing and emerging markets (Torres et al., 2012). As another example, the spread of good word-of-mouth about desirable business practices between international consumers is definitely crucial for multinational enterprises to achieve successful subsidiary operations in foreign markets (Luo and Bhattacharya, 2006). Despite these facts, it is hard to find scholarly attention paid to the discussions linking international marketers, their CSR behavior and its influence on success/failure in foreign markets. Many major questions thus remain unanswered with respect to the nature and consequences of CSR activity for MNEs’ marketing strategies.

The aim of this special issue is to bring together theoretical and empirical advancements connecting CSR and international marketing issues. We seek both theoretical and empirical papers that may address, but are not limited to, the following list of potential research questions:

  • Do international marketers' CSR practices function as a catalyst enhancing international competitiveness and organizational performance in foreign markets?
  • Does good corporate image derived from CSR practices play a pivotal role in acquiring local market information and eventually improving competitiveness in international markets?
  • What are the motivations for CSR practices in foreign markets? Is there any particular relationship between the level of foreign CSR and national brand enhancement? Is there a difference in motivations between the CSR activities of international marketers in developed and developing nations?
  • How do international marketers adapt themselves to host country CSR practices and regulations? What factors influence this adaptation? Does this adaptation process increase the brand value of MNEs?
  • Do international marketers adopt standardized CSR practices, or do they adapt their approaches to host countries? What are the potential benefits/drawbacks and other marketing related consequences?
  • Are the marketing-related and ethically-related benefits of CSR activities universal across foreign markets?
  • Do foreign firms’ advanced environmental and marketing capabilities affect their CSR practices and brand image?
  • How do firms transform environmental capability in order to internationally link it to marketing advantages under the institutional void (i.e., in least developed countries)?
  • How do international marketers manage their CSR best practices in different local market environments?
  • What are international marketing strategies of social enterprises?
  • Is the CSR activity of global marketing firms related to the development of country of origin perceptions, country image or consumer ethnocentrism?
  • Do MNEs in developed and emerging markets differ with respect to their CSR activity, and if so, why? Does it matter in terms of marketing success?
  • Multinational CSR activity: what is it and how should it be measured?
  • What is the impact of CSR communications on employee citizenship behavior across different markets?
  • Do consumers, employees and investors in different countries respond differently to CSR activities and communications?

Submission Instructions

The deadline for submissions is 31 March 2014. Submissions should be made via ScholarOne Manuscripts: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/imrev

All submissions will be subject to the regular double-blind peer review process at the International Marketing Review. The guest editors are seeking reviewers for this issue and are soliciting nominations and volunteers to participate as reviewers. Please contact the guest editors to volunteer or nominate a reviewer.

More Information

To obtain additional information, please contact the guest editors:

Pervez N. Ghauri, King’s College, London (pervez.ghauri@kcl.ac.uk)
Byung Il Park, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies (leedspark@hufs.ac.kr)
Chang Hoon Oh, Simon Fraser University (coh@sfu.ca)

References

Adams, R. B., Licht, A. N., and Sagiv, L. (2011), “Shareholders and stakeholders: how do directors decide?”, Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 32, pp. 1331-1355.
Du, S., Bhattacharya, C. B. and Sen, S. (2010). “Maximizing business returns to corporate social responsibility (CSR): The role of CSR communication”, International Journal of Management Reviews, Vol. 12 No. 1, pp. 8-19.
Freeman, R. E. (1984), Strategic Management: A stakeholder approach. Boston, MA: Pitman.
Lai, C. S., Chiu, C. J., Yang, C. F., and Pai, D. C. (2010), “The effects of corporate social responsibility on brand performance: the mediating effect of industrial brand equity and corporate reputation”, Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 95, pp. 457-469.
Luo, X., and Bhattacharya, B. (2006), “Corporate social responsibility, customer satisfaction, and market value”, Journal of Marketing, Vol. 70, pp. 1-18.
Muller, A., and Kräussl, R. (2011), “Doing good deeds in times of need: a strategic perspective on corporate disaster donations”, Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 32, pp. 911-929.
O’Shaughnessy, K. C., Gedajlovic, E. and Reinmoeller, P. (2007), “The influence of firm, industry and network on the corporate social performance of Japanese firms”, Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Vol. 24, pp. 283-303.
Orlitzky, M., Schmidt, F., and Rynes, S. (2003). “Corporate Social and Financial Performance: A Meta-Analysis”, Organization Studies, Vol. 24, pp. 403–441.
Torres, A., Bijmolt, T. H. A., Tribo, J. A., and Verhoef, P. (2012), “Generating global brand equity through corporate social responsibility to key stakeholders”, International Journal of Research in Marketing, Vol. 29, pp. 13-24.
Turker, D. (2009), “How corporate social responsibility influences organizational commitment”, Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 89, pp. 189-204.
Udayasankar, K. (2008), “Corporate social responsibility and firm size”, Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 83, pp. 167-175.
Waddock, S. A., and Graves, S. B: (1997). “The Corporate Social Performance – Financial Performance Link”, Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 18 No. 4, pp. 303–320.

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is the subject of growing attention from firms, governments and regulators, stakeholder groups, and the media.  Based on various responsibility criteria, a rapidly increasing number of institutes, investment funds, publications and online resources are calling on corporations to alter their business practices.  In response to the increased attention given to corporations’ impact on society and the environment, a 2017 KPMG survey finds substantial growth in global CSR reporting rates (75% in 2017 compared to 64% in 2011 and 18% in 2002) and in the number of firms that include CSR information in their annual reports (60% in 2017 compared to 56% in 2015). Moreover, although the survey reveals that emerging markets from Africa and the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and Latin America are lagging behind North America and Western Europe, two emerging markets—Mexico and Taiwan—experienced the highest growth in CSR reporting relative to 2015 and four—India, Malaysia, South Africa, and Mexico—are among countries with the highest CSR reporting. This growth reflects regulatory changes and new requirements in several countries, as well as greater market awareness and pressure from investors (domestic and foreign) and consumers.

Against this backdrop of increased corporate engagement in social activities worldwide and given the substantial prior evidence in the context of developed countries, this special issue of Emerging Markets Review aims to promote high-quality, theoretical and empirical research that develops a better understanding the determinants and consequences of CSR practices of firms (financial and nonfinancial) and the role CSR plays in emerging financial markets. In particular, we are interested in innovative papers that exploit unique sources of CSR data and apply rigorous empirical methods.

The following are some selected examples of possible research topics:

CSR and corporate governance. How does corporate governance affect CSR behavior? Are better-governed firms more socially responsible? Is CSR an outcome of agency conflicts?

  • Institutional ownership and institutional owner identity (Long-term vs short-term horizons; independent vs. non-independent)
  • Board characteristics: size, independence, heterogeneity (e.g., gender diversity), busyness, interlocks, etc.
  • CEO characteristics: tenure, ownership, power, political ideology, compensation, etc.
  • Ownership concentration and blockholder identity (family, state, etc.)
  • Does privatization in emerging markets affect CSR?
  • Foreign ownership (identity and country of origin of foreign owners) and cross-listing

CSR, formal and informal institutions.

  • What is the impact of informal institutions, such as culture and trust on CSR?
  • How does the institutional, political and economic environments in emerging markets affect CSR and its disclosure?

Do socially responsible firms behave differently than socially irresponsible firms in emerging markets?

  • Investment efficiency
  • Dividends
  • Restructuring
  • Risk-taking
  • Innovation

CSR and corporate performance

  • Is there a CSR valuation premium?
  • Do socially responsible firms perform better than socially irresponsible firms?
  • Do CSR and corporate governance interact to shape corporate performance and corporate valuations?
  • Do CSR and factors related to the institutional, political and economic environments interact to shape corporate performance and corporate valuations?
  • What is the value of CSR during crisis periods?
  • How different are socially responsible firms in emerging markets compared to those in more developed countries?

CSR and access to financing.

  • Access to finance (equity and debt issues, trade credit)
  • Financing costs and credit ratings
  • Stock liquidity
  • Investor base

CSR, financial intermediaries and financial intermediary development.

  • What is the effect of financial market development on CSR?
  • Is CSR more prevalent in bank-based or market-based systems?

Methodology: Use traditional and innovative methodologies to address the endogeneity of CSR.

  • Regression discontinuity design
  • Difference-in-difference
  • Instrumental variables
  • Matching models (Propensity score matching, coarsened exact matching)

Paper Submissions 

The deadline for submitting papers is December 31, 2018. Papers should be submitted by e-mail to csr_emr@aus.edu and copied to nboubakri@aus.edu. All submissions must be in English. Submissions should include two files: (1) full version of the paper with contact information for all authors, and (2) an anonymous version with title and abstract (no identification of the authors). PDF files are preferred, but word files are also accepted.

All submissions will go through a double reviewing process. First, the guest editors will evaluate the submissions. The outcome of the first-stage review process will be communicated to authors by January 31, 2019. Acceptable papers will be sent out for review. The outcome of the second-stage review process will be communicated to authors by March 31, 2019. Papers invited for further consideration for the special issue will have to go through the standard refereeing process of Emerging Markets Review, including addressing the reviewers’ and guest editors comments.  Further instructions will be provided to the authors of the papers considered for publication in the special issue. In cooperation with the Managing Editor, we expect the special issue to be published at the end of 2019 or early 2020.

Special Issue Editors:

Deadline for submission: November 16, 2015

Tentative publication date:   Spring 2017

Introduction

The goal of this special issue of JIBS is to encourage research that deepens knowledge of the creation and capture of entrepreneurial opportunities across national borders by diverse organizational types such as international new ventures (INVs), born global firms, micro-multinationals, corporate entrepreneurs, family businesses, and social and non-profit ventures (e.g., Arregle, Naldi, Nordqvist & Hitt, 2012; Coviello & Jones, 2004; Knight & Cavusgil, 2004; Oviatt & McDougall, 1994; McDougall & Oviatt, 2000; Zahra, 2005; Zahra & George, 2002; Zahra, Newey & Li, 2014). 

International entrepreneurship has been defined as “the discovery, enactment, evaluation, and exploitation of opportunities – across national borders – to create future goods and services” (Oviatt & McDougall, 2005: 7).  Recent commentaries on the field (e.g. Cavusgil & Knight, 2015; Coviello, 2015; Jones, Coviello & Tang, 2011; Keupp & Gassmann, 2009; Mathews & Zander, 2007; Zander, McDougall-Covin & Rose, 2015) have urged scholars to move beyond current understandings of early and accelerated internationalization through richer theoretical and empirical investigations of international entrepreneurship. There has long been consensus that the pursuit of opportunity is the core of entrepreneurship (e.g. Knight, 1921; Schumpeter, 1939; Shane & Venkataraman, 2000), whether opportunities are discovered or created (Alvarez, Barney & Anderson, 2013).   Scholars have identified important processes in this pursuit, including processes related to cognition (e.g. Grégoire, Barr & Shepherd, 2010), effectuation (e.g. Sarasvathy, 2001), and bricolage (e.g. Baker & Nelson, 2005; Garud & Karnoe, 2003), and an opportunity-focused perspective is being extended to international entrepreneurship (e.g. Bingham, 2009; Jones & Casulli, 2014; Mainela, Puhakka & Servais, 2014; Sarasvathy, Kumar, York & Bhagavatula, 2014).

Scholarship that integrates perspectives from entrepreneurship and international business, or spans disciplinary boundaries, can create new perspectives or frameworks that improve our understanding of the creation and capture of opportunities across national borders. We invite submissions that advance international business theory in this domain and, ideally, that also contribute to the entrepreneurship literature.

Possible Research Topics

The proposed special issue focuses on the creation and capture of entrepreneurial opportunities across national borders. We seek papers that advance theoretical perspectives and provide valuable insights and new knowledge to enrich international entrepreneurship scholarship, and also that guide practitioners and policy-makers.  We invite submissions from scholars who, individually or collectively, draw on varied theoretical perspectives, adopt diverse empirical approaches, and investigate at multiple levels of analysis.  We particularly encourage submissions that provide conceptual clarity of international entrepreneurship as pursued by different types of market actors, and those that provide new empirical contributions.  Well-conceived submissions antithetical to this domain are welcome too, provided they make a meaningful contribution to the international business field more generally.  Examples of appropriate topics and research questions include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • How can perspectives from entrepreneurship and international business be integrated to create new perspectives or frameworks to enrich an opportunity-based understanding of international entrepreneurship, and unify and improve heterogeneous constructs and operational definitions?
  • What processes are involved in the creation and capture of entrepreneurial opportunities across national borders?   What accounts for variance in these processes and their outcomes?  What is the role in such processes of key IB concepts such as psychic distance, risk, uncertainty, or transnational communities?
  • How does the pursuit of international opportunities vary across categories of individuals?  What new concepts, relationships or processes are important in understanding the cognitions, behaviors and/or outcomes associated with the pursuit of international opportunities by focal categories of entrepreneurs (for example, immigrant entrepreneurs, ethnic entrepreneurs, transnational entrepreneurs or women entrepreneurs)? 
  • How does the pursuit of international opportunities vary across categories of organizations?  What new concepts, relationships or processes are important in understanding the cognitions, behaviors and/or outcomes associated with the pursuit of international opportunities by focal categories of organizations (for example startups, corporations, SMEs, family businesses, social ventures, not-for-profit ventures, governmental agencies, or non-governmental organizations)?
  • How are organizations managing the challenges of early and/or accelerated internationalization in pursuing international opportunities?  How do such firms manage costs, uncertainty and risks in such environments?  How do they overcome inherent liabilities to be perceived as legitimate and reputable?  What are their subsequent trajectories?  We particularly welcome research in this area on firms in emerging, rapid-growth and less-developed economies, and from disciplines that have been under-represented to-date such as human resource management, finance, accounting, operations and policy studies.
  • How do advanced technologies and digitization provide new and enhanced prospects to create and capture international opportunities?  How does the sociomateriality of technologies impact interactions among market actors, and, for example, overcome the challenges of lack of a local presence?  What are trade-offs between scale and adaptation?
  • How do cultures and institutions, such as governments, regulations, and industries, affect market and nonmarket approaches to the pursuit of international opportunities, and, in turn, how do entrepreneurial activities affect cultural and institutional contexts?  What institutional policies and practices impact, or are impacted by, the pursuit of international opportunities?  How does entrepreneurial internationalization vary across different cultural and institutional environments?

Submission Process

All manuscripts will be reviewed as a cohort for this special issue.  Manuscripts must be submitted in the window between November 2, 2015, and November 16, 2015, at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jibs.  All submissions will go through the JIBS regular double-blind review process and follow the standard norms and processes.

For more information about this call for papers, please contact the Special Issue Editors or the JIBS Managing Editor (managing-editor@jibs.net).

References
Alvarez, S.A., Barney, J.B., & Anderson, P. 2013.  Forming and exploiting opportunities:  The implications of discovery and creation processes for entrepreneurial and organizational research.  Organization Science, 24(1): 301-317.

Arregle, J-L., Naldi, L., Nordqvist, M., & Hitt, M.A. 2012.  Internationalization of family-controlled firms: A study of the effects of external involvement in governance.  Entrepreneurship Theory & Practice, 36(6): 1115-1143.

Baker, T., & Nelson, R. 2005.  Creating something from nothing: Resource construction through entrepreneurial bricolage.  Administrative Science Quarterly, 50(3): 329-366.

Bingham, C. 2009.  Oscillating improvisation: How entrepreneurial firms create success in foreign market entries over time.  Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, 3(4): 321-345.

Cavusgil, S.T., & Knight, G. 2015.  The born global firm:  An entrepreneurial and capabilities perspective on early and rapid internationalization.  Journal of International Business Studies, 46(1): 3-16.

Coviello, N. 2015.  Re-thinking research on born globals.  Journal of International Business Studies, 46(1): 17-26.

Coviello, N., & Jones, M. 2004.  Methodological issues in international entrepreneurship research.  Journal of Business Venturing, 19(4): 485–508.

Garud, R., & Karnoe, P. 2003.  Bricolage versus breakthrough: Distributed and embedded agency in technology entrepreneurship.  Research Policy, 32: 277-300.

Grégoire, D.A., Barr, P.S., & Shepherd, D.A. 2010.  Cognitive process of opportunity recognition:  The role of structural alignment.  Organization Science, 21(2): 413-431.

Jones, M.V., & Casulli, L. 2014.  International entrepreneurship:  Exploring the logic and utility of individual experience through comparative reasoning approaches.  Entrepreneurship Theory & Practice, 38(1): 45-69.

Jones, M. V., Coviello, N., & Tang, Y. K. 2011.  International entrepreneurship research (1989-2009): A domain ontology and thematic analysis.  Journal of Business Venturing, 26(6): 632-659.

Keupp, M., & Gassmann, O. 2009.  The past and the future of international entrepreneurship: A review and suggestions for developing the field.  Journal of Management, 35(5): 600-633.

Knight, G., & Cavusgil, S.T. 2004.  Innovation, organizational capabilities, and the born global firm.  Journal of International Business Studies, 35(2): 124-141.

Knight, F.H. 1921.  Risk, Uncertainty and Profit.  New York:  Houghton Mifflin.

Mainela, T., Puhakka, V., & Servais, P. 2014. The concept of international opportunity in international entrepreneurship:  A review and research agenda.  International Journal of Management Reviews 16(1): 105-129.

Mathews, J., & Zander, I. 2007.  The international entrepreneurial dynamics of accelerated internationalization.  Journal of International Business Studies, 38(3): 387-403.

McDougall, P., & Oviatt, B. 2000.  International entrepreneurship: The intersection of two research paths.  Academy of Management Journal, 43(5): 902–906.

Oviatt, B., & McDougall P. 1994.  Toward a theory of international new ventures.  Journal of International Business Studies, 25(1): 45–64.

Oviatt, B. & McDougall, P. 2005.  The internationalization of entrepreneurship.  Journal of International Business Studies, 36(1): 2-8.

Sarasvathy, S.D. 2001.  Causation and effectuation:  Toward a theoretical shift from economic inevitability to entrepreneurial contingency.  Academy of Management Review, 26(2): 243-263.

Sarasvathy, S., Kumar, K., York, J.G., & Bhagavatula, S. 2014.  An effectual approach to international entrepreneurship: Overlaps, challenges, and provocative possibilities.  Entrepreneurship Theory & Practice, 38(1): 71-93.

Schumpeter, J.A. 1939.  Business cycles:  A Theoretical, Historical, and Statistical Analysis of the Capitalist Process.  New York: McGraw-Hill.

Shane, S., & Venkataraman, S. 2000.  The promise of entrepreneurship as a field of research.  Academy of Management Review, 25(1): 217-226.

Zahra, S. 2005.  A theory of international new ventures: A decade of research.  Journal of International Business Studies, 36(1): 20–28.

Zahra, S., & George, G. 2002.  International entrepreneurship: The current status of the field and future research agenda. In M. Hitt, R. Ireland, M. Camp, & D. Sexton (Eds.) Strategic leadership: Creating a new mindset: 255–288. London: Blackwell.

Zahra, S., Newey, L., & Li, Y. 2014.  On the frontiers:  The implications of social entrepreneurship for international entrepreneurship.  Entrepreneurship Theory & Practice, 38(1): 137-158.

Zander, I., McDougall-Covin, P., & Rose, E.L. 2015.  Born globals and international business: Evolution of a field of research.  Journal of International Business Studies, 46(1): 27-35.

Special Issue Editors

Gary Knight is the Helen Jackson Chair in International Management at Willamette University in Salem and Portland, Oregon, USA, and Visiting Professor at the University of Southern Denmark.  He is Chair of the Western United States Chapter of the Academy of International Business.  He has published widely on born globals and international entrepreneurship, including several articles in JIBS.  His 2004 co-authored article on born globals won the 2014 JIBS Decade Award.  Co-authored books include Born Global Firms: A New International Enterprise.  He is currently an editor of the International Business book collection at Business Expert Press.  He testified on firm internationalization before the US House of Representatives Small Business Committee.  He was inaugural Chair of the “SMEs, Entrepreneurship, and Born Global” track of the Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business.  His co-authored textbook with S. Tamer Cavusgil and John Riesenberger, International Business: Strategy, Management, and the New Realities, 3rd Ed, is published by Pearson Prentice-Hall.  His PhD in international business is from Michigan State University.  Prior to academia, he was the export manager of an internationalizing SME. 

Peter Liesch is Professor of International Business in the UQ Business School at The University of Queensland, Australia.  He has published extensively on small firm internationalization and born global firms.  He co-edited a special issue on early internationalization at the Journal of World Business, and jointly won an Australia Research Council Grant on born globalsFunded by the Australia Business Foundation, he jointly produced Born to be Global: A Closer Look at the International Venturing of Australian Born Global Firms.  His publications have appeared in the Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Journal of World Business, and others.  Currently Associate Editor, Strategy and International Business with the Australian Journal of Management, he was also Senior Editor of the Journal of World Business.  He served as Vice-President (Administration) of the Academy of International Business and Vice-President of the Australia and New Zealand International Business Academy.  A Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management and a Professional Member of the Economics Society of Australian (Qld) Inc., his Ph.D. is from the School of Economics at The University of Queensland.

Lianxi Zhou is Professor of Marketing and International Business in the Goodman School of Business (GSB) at Brock University, Canada.  He is also a Visiting Professor at the Nottingham University Business School (NUBS) China, and has served as Chair Professor in the School of Management and Economics at Shaoxing University and Honorary Professor in the MBA School of Management Zhejiang Gongshang University, China. Previously he taught at the University of Guelph, Canada and Lingnan University in Hong Kong. His recent research on international entrepreneurship has focused on born globals and international new ventures. He brings perspectives from international marketing, entrepreneurship, and IB theories to the study of international entrepreneurship. He has published extensively in refereed journals, including Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Business Venturing, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, International Business Review, Journal of International Marketing, Journal of World Business, and others. Also, he has taught for MBA and EMBA programs in a number of leading universities across Canada, Hong Kong, and the Chinese Mainland. He is currently in the Editorial Board for the Journal of International Marketing. He received his PhD in Marketing from Concordia University in Montreal, Canada.

Rebecca Reuber is Professor of Strategic Management at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, and Area Editor for International Entrepreneurship at JIBS.  Her recent IE research has focused on the internationalization of internet-based new ventures.   She sits on the editorial boards of Journal of Business Venturing and Entrepreneurship Theory & Practice, and recently completed three terms as Associate Editor at Family Business Review.  She has held visiting positions at the University of Adelaide, the University of Glasgow, the University of Victoria, The Australian National University, and Dartmouth College.  She has also conducted policy-oriented research in the international entrepreneurship area, in collaboration with the Conference Board of Canada, Industry Canada, the Department of Foreign Affairs & International Trade Canada, and the Commonwealth Secretariat.

Editors

  • Jasmin Mahadevan,  Pforzheim University, Germany (corresponding editor), jasmin.mahadevan@hs-pforzheim.de
  • Henriett Primecz, Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary
  • Laurence Romani, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden

Publisher: Routledge (2019)

Type of book: casebook

Condensed case chapter (2,000 words) submission: February 15th, 2018

A casebook about intersectionality in Cross-Cultural Management

With the help of rich case studies, we wish to introduce the notion of ‘intersectionality’ to facilitate a critical Cross-Cultural Management (CCM). Intersectionality refers to the understanding that individuals are not only different, but related, and that multiple identity markers need to be considered when trying to comprehend individual life-experiences. Related to CCM, this means to consider ‘culture’ on multiple levels (e.g. national, organizational, professional, et cetera), to acknowledge interrelated processes of social identity (e.g. identification, recognition and sense of belonging) and to pay attention to power-effects as being intertwined with CCM contexts, frameworks and actors (e.g. majority-minority relations, the impact of diversity markers such as gender, race, religion, age, sexual orientation etc., and social class, dominant discourses, dynamics of organizational change etc.).

What we mean by an intersectional approach to culture

An intersectional approach to culture requires us to challenge simple and singular explanations of cultural difference, to investigate the divergent meanings of perceived difference, and to challenge the labels to which perceived difference is attached. For instance, it might be that organizational actors ascribe difficulties in working together to national culture, but a closer investigation might reveal that these perceptions are actually rooted in organizational inequalities of power between headquarters and subsidiary and learned discourses such as ‘modern West’ versus ‘undeveloped non-West’.

Intersectionality therefore also means to acknowledge that every life-experience has a standpoint, and that we are not necessarily able to take up or even approximate the position of others. At the same time, intersectionality invites us to consider how also we, as CCM researchers and actors, are different and related to those with whom we interact. This means that we need to explicate our own standpoints from which we approach CCM and to reflect upon why and how ‘this makes sense to us’. For example, we must assume that the researcher’s cultural identifications will shape their research approach and the interpretations that ‘make sense’ to them, and that the researcher’s embodied, performed or assumed cultural identity will inform how the researcher is perceived by those studied.

References

Acker, J. (2012) ‘Gendered organizations and intersectionality: problems and possibilities’, Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, 31(3): 214-224.

Boogard, B. and Roggeband, C. (2010), ‘Paradoxes of intersectionality’, Organization, 17(1): 53-75.

Kerner, I. (2012). “Questions of intersectionality: Reflections on the current debate in German gender studies, European Journal of Women's Studies, Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 203-218.

McCall, L. (2005). “The complexity of intersectionality”, Signs, Chicago Journals, Vol. 30, No 3, pp. 1771-1800.

Mahadevan, J. (2017), A Very Short, Fairly Interesting and Reasonably Cheap Book about Cross-Cultural Management. London: Sage (in particular, chapters 4 and 5).

Prasad, A. (2006), ‘The jewel in the crown: Postcolonial theory and workplace diversity’. In: Konrad, A.M., Prasad, P. and Pringle, J.K. (eds.), Handbook of Workplace Diversity, London: Sage, 1-21.

Rahman, M. (2017), ‘Islamophobia, the impossible Muslim, and the reflexive potential of intersectionality’. In J. Mahadevan and C.-H. Mayer (eds), Muslim Minorities, Workplace Diversity and Reflexive HRM. London: Taylor and Francis, 35-45.

Ridgeway, C.L. (2009), ‘Framed before we know it: How gender shapes social relations’, Gender & Society, 23(2): 145-60.

Wells, C.C., Gill, R., McDonald, J. (2015).“Us foreigners”: intersectionality in a scientific organization", Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, Vol. 34, No. 6, pp. 539 – 553.

Zanoni, P., Janssens, M., Benschop, Y. and Nkomo, S. (2010), ‘Editorial: Unpacking diversity, grasping inequality: Rethinking difference through critical perspectives’. Organization, 17, 9-29.

Your case chapter

We invite case chapters that highlight selected aspects of an intersectional approach to culture. Cases should be empirical, and can be based in any of the research paradigms as long as they offer ‘thick’ or ‘rich’ insights into single contexts or individuals. They should challenge common-place cultural explanations and offer multiple perspectives, involving power-sensitivity and researcher reflexivity. Learning should flow from the empirical material, not from theory, and should then be put into perspective using selected aspects of an intersectional approach to culture. Each case should focus on a selected few points and conclude with recommendations to practitioners.

Regardless of the focus point of your contribution: Ultimately, we would like to help answer the following questions: If we believe that mainstream (comparative) CCM with its focus on national cultural differences is insufficient – what else do we have to offer? How can CCM not only focus on difference but also show how we are related? What are the cases that highlight how exactly individuals (including the researcher) give divergent and intersecting meaning to perceived difference? How can we better include power in our CCM analyses and conceptualizations? We will be pleased to discuss any ideas for chapters. Please direct all your questions to jasmin.mahadevan@hs-pforzheim.de.

Submission schedule

  • Inform the Editor of your intention to submit a chapter no later than 10 December 2017.                     

For doing so, send an e-mail to jasmin.mahadevan@hs-pforzheim.de, using the subject heading “critical CCM casebook guidelines”. You will receive informative guidelines and sample chapters.

  • Condensed case chapter proposal due 15 February 2018
  • Editorial decision (accept or reject) and feedback to authors who are invited to develop the full chapter 31 March 2018
  • Full chapter (max 5,000 words, including references) due 01 September 2018

Send your submission to

jasmin.mahadevan@hs-pforzheim.de,

using the subject heading “critical CCM casebook submission”.

All submissions will undergo peer-review.

Topics for the chapters may include, but are not limited to:

  • language as linked to cultural hegemony (the power-effects which are linked to language fluency, English as a lingua franca, values attached to certain languages et cetera)
  • diversity, identifications and requirements for cultural belonging (how dominant identity requirements construct disadvantaged individuals/groups, and how these individuals/groups are perceived)
  • cultural explanations, neo-colonialism and organizational power (how organizational conflicts are explained with cultural differences but are rooted in structural hierarchy, history and dominant perceptions on what constitutes ‘good’ management which advantages some over others)
  • challenging dominant viewpoints (how CCM might look like from previously neglected standpoints and what needs to be considered in order to challenge presumed ‘CCM truths’ such as: what does it ‘mean’ to be Muslim?, which are the regions of the world to be considered by CCM?, what defines ‘difference’ in CCM? and so on). This also includes a critique of dominant IM or CCM ‘lenses’ through which phenomena such as expatriation, internationalization et cetera are perceived and researched upon. Moreover, it might refer to neglected facets of culture, for instance by highlighting the relevance of phenomenology, embodiment, habitus, tacit culture, et cetera.

For some years now, fair trade has been typically spoken and written about in solely positive terms, as a ‘trading partnership based on dialogue, transparency and respect, which seeks greater equity in international trade. It contributes to sustainable development by offering better trading conditions to, and securing the rights of, marginalized producers and workers – especially in the South’. (FINE, 2001 in Moore, 2004: 73). However, the current global economic recession has brought with it the need to reflect upon the way in which trade activities are carried out across the world, including those practices associated with fair trade. For example, questions have been asked whether, indeed, the ‘Fair Trade Project’ is entirely beneficial to all involved parties and whether, in the present economic climate, we can actually afford to engage in fair trade.

Responding to Goodman (2004: 910), who sees a need for fair trade to continue to ‘become more politically and economically threatening’ by opening up ‘the definition of “fairness” contra its economic logic to facilitate a broader constituency from which to construct a less privileged, more sustainable, and more just sense of development….plantation workers, growers with lower quality products, and coffee servers can and should become a moral and politicized goal for fair trade…a re-centering of Northern identities around notions of global citizenship rather than those of a one dimensional consumer’, we seek contributions to the critical exploration of the practices and discourses of fair trade.

Contributions to the special issue may take theoretical or empirical approaches to the nature, dysfunctions and/or possibilities of fair trade. They might, for example, include discussions of:

* How fair is fair trade?
* Ethics of consumption and fair trade
* Marketing and fair trade
* Power and identity issues in fair trade
* Mainstreaming of fair trade
* Environmental and sustainability issues of fair trade
* The fair trade status of a city / university
* Fair trade as business strategy
* Political economy of fair trade
* Accreditation and cost of fair trade to producers
* Accountability and impact of fair trade on producers
* Co-operative and collective business models for fair trade


Those wishing to contribute should submit an extended of 1,000 words to Jane Gibbon jane.gibbon@ncl.ac.uk or Martyna Sliwa martyna.sliwa@ncl.ac.uk by 30th November 2009. Feedback on the abstracts will be provided by December 30th 2009. Full papers of 5,000 - 8,000 words should be submitted to the Guest Editors by 30th April 2010.

Suitable articles will be subjected to a double-blind review; hence authors should not identify themselves in the body of the paper.

The special issue is scheduled for publication in February 2011. Papers submitted must not have been published, accepted for publication, or be under consideration for publication. For additional information about the journal please see the journal’s webpage: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cpoib.htm

By the end of this decade, the majority of African countries would have celebrated their 50th independence anniversary. The world has been carefully watching developments on the African continent during this half-century journey, and perceptions broadly oscillate between optimism and pessimism. Rapid socioeconomic gains achieved during the early decades of independence heralded hopeful predictions that the continent was on the march towards prosperity. This Afro-optimistic promise has alternatingly given way to Afro-pessimism as respective African countries have faltered and encountered difficulties in the lead up to the turn of the century. References to a ‘hopeless continent’ (The Economist, 2001) tend to highlight unfavourable business environments, weak institutions, and limited opportunities (Asiedu, 2004).

Rapid economic growth in recent decades and the resilience of African economies in the wake of global recessions have seen the pendulum shifting back towards optimism. Investors and observers increasingly speculate on the promise Africa has for global economic development. Positive perceptions of new and emerging opportunities on the continent underscore this logic. These opportunities are occurring against a backdrop of new developments within Africa which include, inter alia, the emergence of a sizeable middle-class with enhanced purchasing power, the emergence of multinational enterprises (MNEs) from within the region, the evolution of multi-lateral and international trade and investment agreements, and the rising levels of both inward and outward foreign direct investment flows. Alongside these shifts is a widespread transformation of structural, economic, political and social institutions currently underway across numerous African countries. New and rapidly growing trade and investment links are evident between African economies and new emerging economies such as China and India.

A resurgent scholarship on international business in Africa has resulted, focusing variously on the motives and determinants of foreign direct investment (Naudé and Krugell, 2007; Asiedu, 2006); the role of government policies, institutions and corruption on foreign direct investment (Musila and Sigue, 2006), knowledge transfer, and human resource practices within multinational corporations (Horwitz, 2015; Osabutey, William and Debrah, 2014). These and related studies present mixed and sometimes conflicting findings.

What this body of scholarship may tend to share is the unequivocal acceptance of the legitimacy of existing paradigms to explain current shifts being played out across Africa. Critical perspectives of international business in Africa therefore remain few and under the research radar. This widespread acceptance and application of established models may, in particular contexts, limit the ability to critically probe and analyse the current shifts in order to generate fresh insights.

For instance, given the diversity and pluralism of political, economic, sociocultural, and institutional systems among African countries, what are the implications of recent foreign investment flows on existing management practices or inter-state power relations in Africa? Do these represent new possibilities or are these simply a recreation of previous trends? Additionally, in which new ways are the current national, regional and global institutions influencing the international business environment in Africa? How are colonial legacies shaping investment flows in recent times? To what extent might post-colonial African countries be experiencing new forms of colonialism (neo-colonialism) through inward FDI? How does the nature and role of inward FDI from Asia (China and India for example) differ from that originating from the EU, USA or Japan? In which ways do international business and trade fuel conflict and the erosion of human rights in Africa?

The assumption of African homogeneity tends to obfuscate the realities of diversity and complexity as well as limit impactful research. Traditional models of inquiry may not necessarily explain these unanswered questions and leave us less knowledgeable about the motives, practices and implications of international business in Africa. There is however a growing research interest in critical perspectives on international business in Africa (e.g. see Amankwah-Amoah, 2016; Ado and Su, 2016; Ayres, 2012; de Jonge, 2016; Eweje, 2006; Konijn and Tulder, 2015). Although there has been a growing body of research on Africa, it has been suggested that this needs to be marshalled towards a better narrative and understanding of how firms behave, the role of leaders and the management of indigenous enterprises (Amankwah-Amoah, 2016).

This special issue on critical perspectives on international business in Africa is therefore timely. Following the mission of cpoib (Roberts and Dörrenbächer, 2016, 2012) this issues supports critically reflexive discussion of the nature and impact of international business activity in Africa on individuals, specific communities, the environment, the economy and society from inter-, trans-, and multi-disciplinary perspectives. The special issue seek to contribute to IB and related literature, and generate useful information and analysis for business educators, management practitioners and policy makers. Moreover, this special issue aims to provide a platform for scholars to rethink and further develop integrative as well as novel IB frameworks that are relevant in the African context.

Researchers are invited to consider and address these critical IB issues in the African context from a variety of perspectives.  Scholars can identify and examine common issues in Africa as well as highlight country-specific issues. We encourage scholars to apply a wide variety of rigorous methodological approaches drawing on the latest research in this respect. Manuscripts may cover wider perspectives as long as the papers are in line with the broad theme of the proposed special issue: Guiding areas of useful contributions may include, but are not restricted to:

1.      Theory of international business

i.         What is the influence of western IB theory and management practices within international business in Africa? 

ii.        Are there African-specific perspectives which non-African firms could learn from? Are western business practices appropriate within African multinational firms?

2.      Institutions

i.          What are the implications of the wide-ranging diversity of national institutional and governance systems within African countries on foreign direct investment flows and management practices?

ii.         In which new ways are national, regional (African Union/ ECOWAS/EAC/SADC) or international institutions (World Bank/ IMF/UN) influencing the international business environment in Africa? How is regional integration shaping the reality of international business within Africa?

iii.        How are perceptions of fragility, corruption or instability influencing the dynamics of international business in Africa?

iv.        In which ways do colonial legacies influence flows of foreign direct investment (FDI) to Africa? To what extent do the recent flows of foreign investment into Africa constitute neo-colonialism? 

v.         Is there a new narrative to the new Afro-Sino relations?  Is there another story behind resource-seeking motives of Chinese MNEs in Africa?

3.      Bottom of the pyramid

i.         Which are the opportunities and challenges that international business may encounter in developing new products and markets to service consumers at the so-called ‘bottom of the pyramid’ within African countries?

4.      Risk

i.         What are the implications of the contemporary risks of doing business in Africa, including terrorism, domestic insurgencies and political interference?

Submission process and deadlines:

Submissions should follow the author guidelines for critical perspectives on international business which can be found at: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cpoib.htm

The submission deadline is 30th November, 2016, with initial reviewing to be completed by 1st March, 2017, revisions due by 30th June 2017, final decisions by 31st August, 2017, and anticipated publication in 2018.

Submissions should be via the Scholar One Manuscripts online submission system (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cpoib).  Enquiries about the special issue should be directed to the special issue guest editors Dr Richard B. Nyuur (Richard.Nyuur@northumbria.ac.uk) or Dr Roseline Wanjiru (Roseline.Wanjiru@northumbria.ac.uk) or Dr Joseph Amankwah-Amoah (Joseph.Amankwah-Amoah@bristol.ac.uk) or Dr Simeon E. Ifere (sifere@unilag.edu.ng).  

References

Amankwah-Amoah, J. (2016), “Coming of age, seeking legitimacy: The historical trajectory of African management research”, critical Perspectives on International Business, Vol. 12 Iss: 1, pp. 1-14,

Ado, A and Su, Z. (2016), “China in Africa: A Critical Literature Review”, critical perspectives on international business, Vol. 12 Iss: 1, pp. 40-60. 

De Jonge, A. (2016), “Australia-China-Africa Investment Partnerships: A new frontier for triangular cooperation?” critical Perspectives on International Business, Vol. 12 Iss: 1, pp. 61-82.

Asiedu, E. (2004), “Policy reform and foreign direct investment in Africa: Absolute progress but relative decline”, Development Policy Review, Vol. 22 No. 1, pp. 41-48.

Asiedu, E. (2006), “Foreign Direct Investment in Africa: The Role of Natural Resources, Market Size, Government Policy, Institutions and Political Instability”, The World Economy, Vol. 21 Iss: 1, pp. 63-77.

Ayres, C. J. (2012),"The international trade in conflict minerals: coltan", critical Perspectives on International Business, Vol. 8 Iss 2, pp. 178 - 193

Eweje, G. (2006), “Environmental costs and responsibilities resulting from oil exploitation in developing countries: The case of the Niger Delta of Nigeria”, Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 69 Iss: 1, pp. 27-56.

Horwitz, F. (2015), “Human resources management in multinational companies in Africa: a systematic literature review”, The International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 26 Iss: 21, pp. 2786-2809.

Konijn, P & van Tulder, R. (2015),"Resources-for-infrastructure (R4I) swaps", critical Perspectives on International Business, Vol. 11 Iss: 3/4 pp. 259 – 284.

Musila, J. W. and Sigue, S. P. (2006), “Accelerating foreign direct investment flow to Africa: from policy statements to successful strategies”, Managerial Finance, Vol. 32 Iss: 7, pp. 577-593.

Naudé, W. A. and Krugell, W. F. (2007), “Investigating geography and institutions as determinants of foreign direct investment in Africa using panel data”, Applied Economics, Vol. 39, pp. 1223-1233.

Osabutey, E. L., Williams, K. and Debrah, Y. A. (2014), “The potential for technology and knowledge transfers between foreign and local firms: A study of the construction industry in Ghana”, Journal of World Business, Vol. 49 Iss: 4, pp. 560-571.

Roberts, J. and Dörrenbächer, C., (2016), “Renewing the call for critical perspectives on international business: towards a second decade of challenging the orthodox”, critical perspectives on international business, Vol. 12 Iss: 1, pp. 2-21 .

Roberts, J. and Dörrenbächer, C., (2012), “The Futures of critical perspectives on international Business”, critical Perspectives on International Business, 8 Iss: 1, pp. 4‐13.

The Economist (2001), “Africa's elusive dawn”, Vol. 358 Iss: 8210, pp. 17.

Bios of Guest Authors

Richard B. Nyuur, PhD, is a Senior Lecturer in Strategic Management and International Business at the Newcastle Business School, Northumbria University, UK. His research interests lie at the intersection of strategy and international business in the broad areas of foreign direct investment (FDI), international business strategy, international human resource management, and corporate social responsibility. He has published in journals such as International Human Resource Management Journal, Journal of Small Business Management, Thunderbird International Business Review, Journal of Strategy and Management, African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, International Journal of Foresight and Innovation Policy, and Social Responsibility Journal. His scholarly work has also been presented at leading international conferences and published as chapters in peer-reviewed books. He is currently on the editorial boards of Journal of African Business and the European Journal of Economics and Management.

Dr Roseline Wanjiru, PhD, is a Senior Lecturer in Strategic Management and International Business at the Newcastle Business School, Northumbria University, UK. She has broad interdisciplinary research interests in the economic geography of multinational enterprises, the location of foreign direct investment, and economic development particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Roseline has worked in several East African countries and her scholarly work has been published in journals such as World Development, Transnational Corporations, and Regions as well as international conference proceedings. She holds a PhD from the University of Leeds and is currently the programme leader for the Business with Economics and Business with International Management degrees at Newcastle Business School, Northumbria University.

Dr. Simeon Emezana Ifere, PhD, is a lecturer at the Department of Business Administration

University of Lagos. Before returning to academia, he had over 25 years’ industry experience, which includes 5 years in management and 12 years in senior management positions in two Multinational organisations - Elf and Total groups. He also subsequently worked for Total group and Oando Plc as an Operations Consultant and a Turnaround Consultant respectively. His research interests broadly focus on employee engagement and work-life balance, talent management, and corporate social responsibility. His papers are forthcoming in the International Journal of Human resource Management. He has also presented his scholarly work at leading international conferences.

Dr Joseph Amankwah-Amoah, PhD, is an Associate Professor (Senior Lecturer) of Management at University of Bristol. His research focuses on global business strategy, international divestment, liberalisation, international entrepreneurship (business failure), and lateral hiring in emerging economies. Since completing his PhD in 2010, Joseph has published over 80 articles in refereed academic journals, conference proceedings and book chapters. He has published articles in journals such as the International Journal of HRM, Business History, Group & Organization Management, Journal of Business Research, Technological Forecasting and Social Change, European Business Review, Industrial Management & Data Systems, Critical Perspectives on International Business, Management & Organizational History, Thunderbird International Business Review and Journal of General Management

The postcolonial thinker Edward Said (1978, 1993) noted that migration was the great marker of our time and that with the increasing global movement of people there would be increasing ‘inter-cultural’ contact. When viewed through the ‘lens’ of critical organization and management studies, the processes and types of mobility, movement and migration in today’s ‘globalized’ environment present interesting possibilities for a reformulation and reconsideration of mobility within contemporary global capitalism.

In particular, there seems to be much room for the critical study of managerial and professional mobility and movement in business and organization studies, and specifically the idea of the “transnational capitalist class”. Beyond conventional expatriation, there are many new kinds of mobility occurring that involve the transnational capitalist class in the contemporary global business environment. They have yet to be exposed to critical investigation in a sustained fashion. In Western-based multinational companies these include the development of mobile ‘global elites’ and increasing numbers of short-term, commuter and rotational assignments and assignees (Dickmann and Doherty, 2010; McKenna and Richardson, 2007; Suutari, 2003).

The implications of these systems and forms of mobility in the broader context of ‘globalization’ and global capitalism have yet to be significantly explored from a critical perspective. In addition, the so-called self-initiated expatriate (SIE) has recently come under scrutiny. The SIE is an individual who ‘expatriates’ independently of an organizational sponsor. Much of the research on the SIE has been conducted on and with professionals moving from Western countries to other parts of the world (Jokinen, Brewster and Suutari, 2008; Myers and Pringle, 2005; Richardson, 2006; Selmer and Lauring, 2010; Tharenou and Caulfield, 2010). While there has been some more critical work undertaken on the ‘whiteness’ of these SIEs and emigrants in the broader sociological literature (Leonard, 2010), very little has been undertaken from a critical paradigm specific to business and organizations.

In this special issue, then, we seek papers that subject the globally mobile managerial and professional class, particularly in the context of business and organizational studies, to critical investigation.

The list below presents illustrative topics for contributions:

• How can we conceptualize organizational and self-initiated managerial professional global mobility critically?
• To what extent do globally mobile professionals represent a transnational capitalist class operating in the interests of global capital? How do this growing transnational class reflect changes in the global labour process?
• To what extent are those who are globally mobile professionals, both within organizational contexts and SIE’s engaging in ‘Imperial careering’?  What are the elements of ‘Imperial careering’ in the contemporary business world and how can we link it to a postcolonial analysis?
• Who are the globally mobile elite and why are they being created by corporations?  What purposes do a globally mobile elite perform within multinational corporations that maintain and enhance discourses and structures of multinational power and dominance?
• What is the impact of global mobile professionals on the locations to which they move?  How is ‘whiteness’ important in this mobility and in forms of racial hierarchicalization in host locations?  How can we conceptualize and empirically research globally mobile professionals from non-metropolitan centres?  What are the gendered aspects of professional global mobility? 
• What do concepts such as hybridization and mimicry offer a critical analysis of mobility and how has hybridization in particular been appropriated by multinational corporations?
• How do globally mobile professionals impact the host countries from a critical perspective?
• How does the movement of the global professional and managerial class underpin a globalized system of neoliberalism?  Do the global professional and managerial class constitute a group from all parts of the world who cross borders in support of global capital?

We welcome theoretical, conceptual and empirical papers that explore and investigate the critical dimensions of the global mobility of professionals and managers as a developing transnational capitalist class.

Submission process:

Submissions should follow the author guidelines for Critical Perspective on International Business which can be found at: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cpoib.htm

The submission deadline is 1st September 2012, with initial reviewing to be completed by 30th November 2012, revisions due by 1st February 2013, final decisions by 1st May 2013, and anticipated publication in early 2014.

Submissions should be via the Scholar One Manuscripts online submission system (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cpoib).

Please direct questions to any of the special issue editors at: smckenna@yorku.ca, M.N.Ravishankar@lboro.ac.uk, D.Weir@ucs.ac.uk

References

Dickmann, M., & Doherty, N. (2010).  Exploring organizational and individual career goals, interactions, and outcomes of developmental international assignments.  Thunderbird International Business Review, 52, 301-311.

Jokinen, T., Brewster, C., & Suutari, V. (2008).  Career capital during international work experiences: contrasting self-initiated expatriate experiences and assigned expatriation.  The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 19, 979-998.

Leonard, P. (2010). Expatriate Identities in Postcolonial Organizations: Working Whiteness, Surrey: Ashgate.

McKenna , S., & Richardson, J. (2007).  The increasing complexity of the internationally mobile professional:  issues for research and practice.  Cross Cultural Management, 14, 307-329.

Myers, B., & Pringle, J. K. (2005).  Self-initiated Foreign Experience as Accelerated Development:  Influences of Gender.  Journal of World Business, 40, 421-431.

Richardson, J. (2006).  Self-directed expatriation:  family matters.  Personnel Review, 35, 469-486.

Said, E.W. (1978) Orientalism, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd.

Said, E.W. (1993) Culture and Imperialism, New York: Vintage.

Selmer, J., & Lauring, J. (2010).  Self-initiated academic expatriates:  Inherent demographics and reasons to expatriates.  European Management Review, 7, 169-179.

Suutari, V. (2003).  Global managers:  Career orientation, career tracks, life-style implications and career commitment.  Journal of Managerial Psychology, 18, 185-207.

Tharenou, P., & Caulfield, N. (2010).  Will I stay or will I go?  Explaining repatriation by self-initiated expatriates.  Academy of Management Journal, 53, 1009-1028.

Urry, J. (2000), Sociology beyond societies: Mobilities for the twenty-first century, Routledge, London.

About the Guest Editors

Dr Steve McKenna is Professor of Human Resource Management at York University, Toronto. His research interests include global mobility, postcolonial approaches to management and organization studies and the processes involved in ‘learning to work’.  He co-convened a sub-theme at EGOS in 2007 from which came a special issue of the Journal of Management Development on ‘Managing, managerial control and managerial identity in the post-bureaucratic world’.  He has published articles in Organization, Management Learning, International Journal of Human Resource Management and Management International Review.  He is regional editor (North America) for Personnel Review.

Dr. M.N. Ravishankar is Reader in Globalization and Emerging Markets at the School of Business and Economics, Loughborough University, UK. His research interests span culture and its interface with business strategies, offshore outsourcing of work and IT-enabled transformations in emerging markets. Ravi’s research has appeared in leading international journals such as Information Systems Research, Journal of Vocational Behaviour and Omega.

Professor David Weir is Dean of the Business School at University Campus Suffolk, UK.  He is also Emeritus Professor of the University of Northumbria, Visiting Professor in Management Development at Lancaster University, Visiting Professor Bristol Business School, Professor Affilie, ESC Rennes, France and Distinguished Visiting Professor, ETQM College, Dubai.  He is a Companion of the Chartered Institute of Management and the author of several books including the best selling “Modern Britain” series.  He is currently completing a book on “Management in the Arab world”.  He was a joint editor of the book Critical Management Studies at Work (2009), Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

The European single market has come a long way in allowing for the free movement of people, goods, services and capital across the Union. European institutions, organizations, businesses and private citizens, can potentially operate, compete and coexist within a supranational society, the citizens of which come from divergent cultural backgrounds of no fewer than 27 member states, that become even more composite as a result of an increasing influx of migrant workers seeking a better life in Europe.

Externally, European organizations expand their scope of activities following EU's leading position in the global political and economic arena, including its role in the so much needed Islamic-Western mutual understanding and reconciliation. This reality is reflected in the complexity of the European business, governance and administrative environment that demands a high level of cultural competency from organizations and their management. A cross-cultural know-how that can potentially become an organizational resource needs to be developed that will expand managers' effectiveness in a wide spectrum of international and home settings.

Yet, research allowing us to improve our understanding of cross-cultural management issues, in Europe and elsewhere, is rather limited. Researchers intending to address this gap are invited to submit their work to this special issue. Theoretical and/or empirical papers of both a quantitative and a qualitative nature on all aspects of modern management are invited. A European-Mediterranean perspective is preferable.

Topics could include but are not limited to:

* Implications of culture on managerial styles and decision making
* Culture and strategy: implications of culture for strategic decision making
* Strategic alliances, mergers and acquisitions across cultures
* Implications of culture on management practice
* Corporate and organizational cultures
* Leadership in multi-cultural contexts
* Marketing services and products in cross-cultural environments
* Culture's impact on customer behaviour
* Ethnocentrism
* Cross-cultural communications and negotiations
* Management ethical Issues related to culture
* Cross-cultural perspectives of branding strategies.

Submission guidelines

Papers submitted must not have been published, accepted for publication, or presently be under consideration for publication with any other journal. Submissions should be approximately 4,000-6,000 words in length. Submissions to Cross Cultural Management must be made using the ScholarOne Manuscript Central system. For more details, please visit Emerald Insight and consult the author guidelines. A separate title page must be uploaded containing the title, author(s), and contact information for the author(s).

Suitable articles will be subjected to a double-blind review; hence authors should not identify themselves in the body of the paper.

Guest Editors

Yaakov Weber

College of Management Academic Studies, Israel

Shlomo Tarba

University of Birmingham, UK

Consulting Editor

Daniel Rottig

Florida Gulf Coast University, USA

Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) of companies located in emerging markets (EMs) as well as M&A deals that have originated from emerging market firms in recent years account for a large share of foreign direct investment (Rottig, 2017). Furthermore, the majority of outward foreign direct investment from EMs is created through M&As that help firms to achieve strategic objectives such as growth and acquisitions of technology and resources. However, the number of studies that focus on M&As in and out of EMs is much smaller than those studies that analyze M&As in and out of developed economies, which constitute a major research gap and opportunity for future studies. For example, a recent review of the literature on the critical success factors of M&As (Gomes, Angwin, Weber and Tarba, 2013; Rottig and Reus, 2018) concluded that there is a scarcity of theoretical and empirical work examining cross-border M&As by EM firms.  Moreover, based on a meta-analysis of culture’s consequences for acquisition performance, Rottig (2017: 28) notes that “the majority of culture-related acquisition performance research is based on samples of acquirers and targets in developed countries with a recent emergence of studies examining acquisitions of Western-based firms in emerging markets. Interestingly, however, we could not identify a single empirical study that examined the effects of cultural differences on acquisition performance based on a sample of acquisitions of emerging market targets by emerging market acquirers. Against the background of the recent proliferation of acquisitions across emerging markets – with emerging market acquirers accounting for 53 percent of global cross-border acquisitions and 72 percent of targets being located in emerging markets (UNCTAD, 2014) – future research is likely to make a contribution by theoretically examining the unique institutional environments of emerging markets, developing location-specific conceptual models for the culture-based acquisition performance determinants in these markets, and empirically analyzing such models based on samples of acquirers and target firms that are indigenous to these markets.” These reviews point out the need for more research on M&As within EMs as well as M&As originating from EM firms.

Most of the scarce, extant literature on M&As in and out of EMs is based on samples from only one single country such as China or India, and the results are mixed. It is questionable whether conclusions drawn from studies of M&As in one emerging market context can be generalized to other EM contexts and other EM firms. Furthermore, there is a lack of research testing the applicability of findings and theories from the literature on cross-border M&As in developed countries in the context of M&As in and out of EM. For example, more research is needed on the unique institutional (external and internal) factors in EMs that impact the strategies, implementation, and performance of M&A in EMs (e.g., see Rottig, 2016). Studies have therefore pointed to the fact that that there are significant differences in institutional environments between developed economies and emerging economies, and underscored the need for extending the existing knowledge on M&As by exploring these transactions in new national and organizational settings (Ahammad, Leone, Tarba, Glaister & Arslan, 2017; Buckley, Elia, & Kafouros, 2014).

This special issue aims to foster the research streams on antecedents (factors affecting performance) and outcomes (performance) of cross-border mergers and acquisitions in and out of emerging markets. This complex, widespread and growing phenomenon of M&As will require the incorporation of multidisciplinary, multi-level and cross-cultural models and analyses (Junni, Sarala, Tarba, & Weber, 2015; Weber, 2012; Weber, Tarba, & Oberg, 2013).

We invite papers that focus on theories and findings that explain pre- and post-M&A processes in EMs. We encourage both conceptual and empirical (quantitative and qualitative) contributions that may address, but are not limited to, the following topics:

Multidisciplinary Approach and Interrelationships Among M&A Stages in and out of EMs:

  • What insights can perspectives from strategy, organizational behavior, international management, psychology, sociology, anthropology and other disciplines provide to our understanding of M&A performance in and out EMs?
  • Given that some studies show that experience does not necessarily lead to better performance, how can Learning theory, the Knowledge-based-view and/or Resource-based-view explain M&A performance in EMs?
  • Do strategic goals, strategic choices and screening processes during the pre-M&A stage lead to different psychological experiences and outcomes that require different HR practices and implementation approaches in the post-M&A stage in an emerging market context?

Success Factors at M&A Stages in and out of EMs

  • What are the success factors during the planning, closing and implementation stages of M&A in EMs?
  • How do the unique institutional contexts of emerging markets affect M&A performance across stages in the M&A process?
  • What are the roles of leadership and trust during different stages of M&A in EMs?
  • What are the best practices for synergy realization in M&As in and out EMs?
  • Under what circumstances (e.g., institutional contexts, industries, firm size) are communication, training, staffing, recruiting, rewarding and other practices during the pre and post-merger period the most effective?

Paper Submission Deadline:      December 20, 2018

Guidelines on Submission:

  • Please visit the International Journal of Emerging Market website at www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/ijoem for details about author and submission guidelines.
  • Please submit your papers directly through the ScholarOne submission and review system, which you can access via http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijoem Please select this special issue in ScholarOne when submitting your paper.


References:
 

Ahammad, M. F., Leone, V., Tarba, S. Y., Glaister, K. W., & Arslan, A. (2017). Equity ownership in cross-border mergers and acquisitions by British firms: An analysis of real options and transaction cost factors. British Journal of Management, 28 (2), 180-196.

Buckley, P. J., Elia, S., & Kafouros, M. (2014). Acquisitions by emerging market multinationals: Implications for firm performance. Journal of World Business, 49(4), 611-632.

Gomes, E., Angwin, D. N., Weber, Y., & Tarba, S. Y. 2013. Critical success factors through the mergers and acquisitions process: Revealing pre- and post-M&A connections for improved performance. Thunderbird International Business Review, 55(1): 13-35.

Junni, P., Sarala, R., Tarba, S. Y., & Weber, Y. (2015). Strategic agility in acquisitions. British Journal of Management, 26(4), 596-616.

Rottig, D. 2016. Institutions and emerging markets: Effects and implications for multinational corporations. International Journal of Emerging Markets, 11(1): 2-17.

Rottig, D. 2017. Meta-analys es of culture's consequences for acquisition performance: An examination of statistical artifacts, methodological moderators and the context of emerging markets. International Journal of Emerging Markets, 12(1): 8-37.

Rottig, D. & Reus, T. H. 2018. Research on culture and international acquisition performance: A critical evaluation and new directions. International Studies of Management & Organization, 48(1): 3-42.

UNCTAD. 2014. World Investment Report: Investing in the SDGs: An action plan. New York: United Nations Publications.

Weber, Y. 2012. Handbook of Research on Mergers and Acquisitions. Edward Elgar, MA, USA.

Weber, Y., Tarba, S.Y., & Oberg, C. (2013). A Comprehensive Guide to Mergers and Acquisitions: Managing the Critical Success Factors Across Every Stage of the M&A Process. USA & UK: Financial Times Press.

CSR in Developing Countries: Towards a Development-Oriented Approach

Editors: Dima Jamali, Charlotte Karam & Michael Blowfield

Since the turn of the millennium, we have witnessed a surge of interest in the notion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) coupled with an explosion in the number of articles, books, and chapters written on the topic. CSR is generally used as an umbrella term to describe the complex and multi-faceted relationships between business and society and to account for the economic, social and environmental impacts of business activity. Within the literature emerging from developed economies, CSR has been examined along three main tracks, namely as a function of profit maximizing behavior (McWilliams & Siegel, 2002), institutional pressures (Campbell, 2007), or managerial cognition (Muller & Kolk, 2009).

In this respect, scholars have delved into various aspects and applications of CSR including the use of CSR for legitimation, the relationship between CSR and financial performance and analyses of institutional pressures affecting CSR expressions. While this research has significantly advanced our understanding of CSR and its antecedents and implications, the bulk of this research has been concentrated in developed economies and in European and North American countries more specifically.

There has been a burgeoning parallel interest in understanding the dynamics and peculiarities of CSR in developing economies (Blowfield & Frynas, 2005; Newell & Frynas, 2007; Idemudia, 2011). Authors have contested the immediate transferability of frameworks and conclusions drawn in the developed world to developing countries and have argued for the need for a more nuanced analysis of how CSR manifests itself in emerging markets (Egri & Ralston, 2008; Kolk & Lenfant, 2010; Kolk & Van Tulder, 2010). The context-dependence of CSR has indeed been re-emphasized in recent years and the fact that developing countries present peculiar institutional constellations that affect CSR manifestations is now well-recognized (e.g. Jamali & Sidani, 2012; Visser, 2008). Scholars have suggested for example that philanthropy constitutes the main expression of CSR in the developing world whether because of prevailing cultural norms and expectations (Jamali &Neville, 2011; Gao, 2009), religious expectations (Jamali, Sidani, & El-Asmar, 2009a; Jamali, Zanhour, & Keshishian, 2009b) or the difficult and pressing socio-economic needs which put pressure on firms to embrace philanthropic programs and interventions (Frynas, 2005).

Other institutional gaps that affect the expressions of CSR in developing countries, include the contracted and retracted role of governments in developing countries (Frynas, 2005; Amaeshi et al., 2006) which often creates environments that are ripe for abuse (Khavul & Bruton, 2013; Newenham-Kahindi, 2011) and the weakness of drivers pertaining to business associations and nongovernmental organizations (Jamali & Neville, 2011). Ite (2005) identifies corruption, poor governance and the lack of accountability to be the main hindrances for CSR in Nigeria, causing exacerbated poverty and unemployment. Hence while there has been some increased scholarship on CSR in developing countries, and new insights into the cultural and local specifics of CSR engagement, there is need for additional research that can inform a more nuanced and sophisticated research agenda that links to public policy and development goals in more substantive ways. In fact various authors have highlighted a core challenge pertaining to how to move CSR beyond philanthropy, rhetoric, legitimization, imagery, and public relations in the developing world to substantive engagement that addresses engrained social problems (e.g. poverty, education, unemployment) and that has developmental impact and implications (Barkemeyer, 2009; Karam & Jamali, 2013).

Hence, this book volume is intended to highlight the current discussion on CSR in developing countries, through the voices of authors, scholars and practitioners working in these contexts. The editors welcome contributions pertaining to various aspects of CSR engagement in developing countries, with a particular focus on the question of the promise and potential of CSR to serve as an effective development tool.

The question of how the business sector can serve as an effective agent of change in the developing world is important and timely, particularly as the CSR paradigm continues to be anchored in voluntary self-regulatory conceptions (Barmekeyer, 2009; Jamali, 2010). In this respect, Blowfield and Dolan (forthcoming) begin to chart the way by giving insights into how the business sector has moved from a reactive non-intentional role in promoting development to a more proactive and engaged stance and specify three important criteria for an engaged developmental orientation pertaining to investing one’s capital, giving primacy to the poor and their issues, and accountability to address poverty and marginalization. In summary we invite contributions to this book volume seeking to address two primary questions. The first question is to what extent and in what ways do CSR agenda challenges and initiatives differ in developing economies, and how to account for these variations?

The second equally important question is how CSR can be mobilized more effectively to serve as a development tool, in the sense of aligning more systematically with meeting development goals that are worthy and substantive. We believe that exploring CSR in developing country contexts is important because these are the contexts where CSR and developmental needs are most acute (Jamali & Mirshak, 2007; Visser, 2008) and because developing countries often present a distinctive set of CSR agenda challenges which may have qualitative differences from those faced in the developed world (Visser, 2008). We also believe that in our current time, CSR needs to be examined more systematically not only in terms of constraints but also in terms of developmental potential in addressing relevant societal concerns and local development needs. We invite a range of nuanced contributions that are able to move beyond the ideological fault lines of CSR is good versus bad (Dolan & Rajak, 2011), to focus on the CSR peculiarities, ambivalences and tensions of CSR in developing countries and addressing the CSR-development nexus or interface more specifically.

Some questions that can guide contributors as they reflect on possible topics include:

  1. What are the possible lines of inquiry linking CSR to development? What are the important questions needed to be asked to develop fruitful future research directions on CSR in developing countries?
  2. What are the specificities of CSR in developing countries? How to account for the variation?
  3. What does it mean for business to be a genuine development agent?
  4. How can CSR be leveraged, or mobilized, or tailored for greater developmental impact in different developing contexts?
  5. What is meant by inclusive growth or inclusive capitalism and how can companies channel some of their innovative ingenuity to worthwhile development needs and projects in the developing world?
  6. What are the questions that CSR researchers should be asking to contribute to a locally appropriate CSR discourse while simultaneously remaining relevant to the global CSR dialogue?Similarly, what questions should practitioners be asking to make a local contribution and to lead the development-oriented CSR forward on the global stage?
  7. Where can CSR research in developing countries feed back into CSR research and practice in developed countries?
  8. What are the practical and methodological challenges of conducting quantitative and qualitative CSR research within and across developing economies and how can these serve as opportunities for developing innovative and stimulating new avenues for CSR research in general?
  9. What are the practical challenges of implementing development-oriented CSR initiatives within and across developing economies and how can these serve as opportunities for developing innovative and stimulating new avenues for responsible engagement?

A brief (one page) proposal or outline of your book chapter in terms of intended structure and main arguments and objectives is due by end of November 2013; we will endeavor to get back to you in relation to acceptance by end December 2013 and the full chapter contribution will be due on May 30, 2014.

In terms of formatting guidelines, Greenleaf formatting guidelines should be closely followed. These include the following (we should check with John): - Harvard referencing should be used throughout - The entire manuscript is double-spaced - Tables and diagrams are sent separately from the text

REFERENCES

Amaeshi, K. M., Adi, B. C., Ogbechie, C., & Amao, O. O. (2006). Corporate social responsibility in Nigeria: Western mimicry or indigenous influences? Journal of Corporate Citizenship, 24 (winter) 83-99. Barkemeyer, R. (2009). Beyond compliance – below expectations? Cross-border CSR, development and the UN Global Compact. Business Ethics: A European Review, 18(3), 273-289. Blowfield, M. (2007). Reasons to be cheerful? What we know about CSR’s impact. Third World Quarterly, 28(4), 683-695. Blowfield, M., & Dolan, C. (Forthcoming). Business as development agent: Evidence of possibility and improbability. Blowfield, M., & Frynas, J. G. (2005). Setting new agendas: critical perspectives on corporal social responsibility in the developing world. International Affairs, 81(3), 499–513. Campbell, J. L. (2007). Why would corporations behave in socially responsible ways? An institutional theory of corporate social responsibility. Academy of Management Review, 32, 946–967. Dolan, C. & Rajak, D. (2011). Introduction: Ethnographies of corporate ethicizing. Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology, 60, 3-8. Egri, C. P., & Ralston, D. A. (2008). Corporate responsibility: A review of international management research from 1998 to 2007. Journal of International Management, 14, 319-339. Frynas, J. G. (2005). The false development promise of corporate social responsibility: Evidence from multinational oil companies. International Affairs, 81, 581-98. Gao, Y. (2009). Corporate social performance in China: Evidence from large companies. Journal of Business Ethics, 89, 23-35. Greenfield, W. M. (2004). In the name of corporate social responsibility. Business Horizons, 47(1), 19-28. Idemudia U. (2011). Corporate social responsibility and developing countries: Moving the critical CSR research agenda in Africa forward. Progress in Development Studies, 11(1), 1-18. Ite, U.E. (2005). Poverty reduction in resource-rich developing countries: what have multinational corporations got to do with it? Journal of International Development, 17, 913-929. Jamali, D. (2010). The CSR of MNC subsidiaries in developing countries: Global, local, substantive or diluted? Journal of Business Ethics, 93, 181-200. Jamali, D., & Mirshak, R. (2010). Business-conflict linkages: Revisiting MNCs, CSR and conflict. Journal of Business Ethics, 93(3), 443-464. Jamali, D., & Mirshak, R. (2007). Corporate social responsibility: Theory and practice in a developing country context. Journal of Business Ethics, 72(1), 243-262. Jamali, D. & Neville, B. (2011). Convergence versus divergence of CSR in developing countries: an embedded multi-layered institutional lens. Journal of Business Ethics, 102(4), 599-621. Jamali, D. & Sidani, Y. (2012). CSR in the Middle East: Fresh perspectives. In D. Jamali, & Y. Sidani (Ed.), Introduction: CSR in the Middle East: Fresh Perspectives (pp. 1-11). Palgrave Publishers: UK. Jamali, D., Sidani, Y., & El-Asmar, K. (2009a). Changing managerial CSR orientations: A three country comparative analysis of Lebanon, Syria and Jordan. Journal of Business Ethics, 85(1), 173-192. Jamali, D., Zanhour, M., & Keshishian, T. (2009b). Peculiar strengths and relational attributes of SMEs in the context of CSR. Journal of Business Ethics, 87(3), 355–367. Karam, C., & Jamali, D. (2013). Gendering CSR in the Arab Middle East: an institutional perspective. Business Ethics Quarterly, 23(1), 31-68. Khavul, S., & Bruton, G. D. (2013). Harnessing innovation for change: Sustainability and poverty in developing countries. Journal of Management Studies, 50(2), 285-306. Kolk, A., & Lenfant, F. (2010). MNC reporting on CSR and conflict in Central Africa. Journal of Business Ethics, 93, 241-255. Kolk, A., & Van Tulder, R. (2010). International business, corporate social responsibility and sustainable development. International Business Review, 19(2), 119-125. McWilliams, A., & Siegel, D. (2002). Corporate social responsibility: A theory of the firm perspective. Academy of Management Review, 26, 177–127. Muller, A., & Kolk, A. (2009). CSR performance in emerging markets: Evidence from Mexico. Journal of Business Ethics, 85(2), 325-337. Newell, P., & Frynas, J. G. (2007). Beyond CSR? Business, poverty and social justice: An introduction. Third World Quarterly, 28(4), 669-681. Newenham-Kahindi, A. M. (2011). A global mining corporation and local communities in the Lake Victoria Zone: The case of Barrick Gold multinational in Tanzania. Journal of Business Ethics, 99, 253–282. Visser, W. (2008). Corporate social responsibility in developing countries. In A. Crane, A. McWilliams, D. Matten, J. Moon, & D. Siegel (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Corporate Social Responsibility (pp. 473-479). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Whether conducted internationally or within the same nation, cross-cultural research relies heavily on questionnaires and surveys. However, analysts often wonder whether responses generated by respondents from different cultural contexts mean the same thing. Cultural background may shape how different people use the same response scales. Likewise, self-report questions might elicit tendencies that interfere with what a survey researcher might want to know. In other cases, culture might influence as to whether respondents provide answers to the question as stated in the text, or if they are inclined to tailor their answer based on the specific context in which the question is being asked. And yet in other cases, participants’ answers may differ as a function of whether a question appears early or late in the same survey.

The present Special Section aims to bring together contemporary research that tackles problems of survey responding in a cross-cultural context. The focus is on issues, which have the potential of compromising cultural comparisons, yet which may also be of interest as cultural phenomena in their own right. Issues include, but are not limited to, acquiescent responding, disaquiescent responding, extreme responding, middling responding, socially desirable responding and context-driven responding. Papers may wish to diagnose cultural response tendencies, broadly construed, and demonstrate the consequences for conclusions about cultural differences. Similarly, papers may wish to propose new approaches in how to deal with various response tendencies, either at the stage of questionnaire design or the analysis of self-report data. Papers are also encouraged if they examine the predictors of cultural response tendencies, or demonstrate the conditions under which they are present or absent. Both theoretical and empirical contributions will be considered.

Manuscripts should be no longer than 6,000 words (including footnotes, references, tables, and figures, but excluding the abstract), have no more than 30 references, and include a 200-word abstract. If warranted (e.g., when reporting a coherent series of multiple studies) longer manuscripts may be considered, but authors are encouraged to contact the special section editor. Manuscripts are expected to follow standard guidelines of the International Journal of Psychology (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291464-066X/homepage/ForAuthors.html). Submissions will be peer-reviewed.

To ensure the suitability of a manuscript for the special section, authors should send an abstract (300-500 words) to reach the Guest Editor, Markus Kemmelmeier (markusk@unr.edu) by December 15, 2014, before submitting the complete manuscript. Manuscripts must be submitted in electronic form via IJP’s website (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/pijp).

Deadline for paper submissions is April 30, 2015.

Papers acceptable for publication that cannot be published in this special section may be considered for publication in a regular issue of the International Journal of Psychology, unless authors explicitly decline this option.

This is a call for papers for a special issue of Research in International Business and Finance focused on behavioral explanations for the use of outside financing by business firms.  This topic has assumed great importance following the global financial crises of 2007-2008 and the great recession that followed.  One of the major causes of these events has been traced to the high leverage employed.  However, there have been wide international variations in the leverages employed and in the outside financing used by entities in various countries and not all countries suffered equally in these crises. This special issue will focus on the international differences in outside financing and financial leverages used by businesses and possible explanations for these international differences.

Traditionally, research on the capital structure of firms has focused on the impact of firm-level variables to assess the relative strength of the pecking order theory versus the trade-off theory and other theories. However, it seems outcomes in finance, including capital structure and financing decisions, are shaped by laws and institutions that result from nations’ culture and history. Thus, there has been much interest in how international differences in risk attitudes and other national social and institutional characteristics influence the availability of external finance and the capital structure of firms. Recent research has begun to examine the influence of such factors as national culture, social trust, legal origins, bankruptcy laws, disclosure environments, governance, employment rights, and other national behavioral characteristics on the capital structures of firms.

Additionally, since traditional research on capital structure and financing sources has focused on non-financial firms, we also invite papers focused on financial and/or service firms. We feel the capital structure of financial firms is of particularly timely relevance as nations recover from the recent financial crisis and consider the impact of financing restrictions of banks.

Papers that use new and or novel empirical methodologies to examine topical issues using extensive cross-sectional and time-series international data sets are particularly welcome.  We are also interested in behavioral explanations that are backed up by adequate empirical analysis.

In order to enhance the fit of a manuscript with the goals of the special issue, potential authors are invited to submit and receive feedback on a three page summary of the proposed paper as early as possible. 

Journal information and author guidelines can be accessed at
http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/699534/authorinstructions

Please send your manuscripts and other inquiries to the attention of the special issue editors: 

Raj Aggarwal and John Goodell at: RIBAFSpecialIssueAG@gmail.com;

Journal information and author guidelines can be accessed at:
http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/699534/authorinstructions

The deadline for submission of completed manuscripts is July 30, 2012.  We look forward to your submissions to this special issue of the RIBAF.

The German Journal of Research in Human Resource Management is the highest ranked German journal covering research on all issues related to Human Resource Management (HRM) and is listed by the SSCI. The Special Issues published in English receive considerable attention both in Germany and across Europe.

This Special Issue is dedicated to current issues in international HRM: Global assignments, global careers and global talent management. These topics have gained tremendous importance due to the increasing globalization of the world economy and the war for internationally qualified talent. This not only applies to multinational enterprises, but also to small- and medium-sized enterprises, as senior managers are challenged to attract and retain global talent.

We seek to publish research articles that deepen our understanding of phenomena related to global assignments, global careers and global talent management from both individual and from organizational perspectives. Individual perspectives include challenges of various types of assignments and their management. Papers on global careers might address, for example, the success of international assignments, female careers in international management, or cross-cultural learning processes of expatriates. The organizational perspective comprises various functional areas in IHRM, including the most important practice, global talent management. However, topics such as expatriate management and global performance management are also related to global assignments, global careers, and talent management.

The objective of this Special Issue is to draw together scholars who are working at the forefront of this research domain. This includes strong theoretical, conceptual and/or empirical papers using quantitative or qualitative approaches in order to advance our knowledge of international HRM – especially with regard to global assignments, global careers, and global talent management.

As an illustrative (but not exhaustive) list of themes/topics we hope to see addressed in this special issue are:
•    Various types of assignments (traditional, self-initiated assignments, etc.)
•    Expatriation and repatriation for various types of assignments
•    International careers
•    Female careers in international management
•    Global performance management
•    Global talent management
•    Cross-cultural training methods
•    Cross-cultural learning
•    Human resource development strategies
•    A comparative approach to human resource development
•    Any additional theoretical, empirical, review or model-building contributions in international human resource development (broadly defined).

Submissions
In order to be considered for publication in this Special Issue, an abstract of two pages should be sent to the editors by 15 July, 2012. The submission process is competitive, and the Editors will review the abstracts and contact authors with an invitation to submit full manuscripts. Abstracts and full papers should be written in English.
The deadline for the full papers is 31 December, 2012. The papers will undergo a double-blind review process. Submitted papers must represent original work that is unpublished and not currently submitted or under review for possible publication in other journals. Formal guidelines for final submission are available from: www.Hampp-Verlag.de or www.zfp-personalforschung.de. Publication is scheduled in late 2013.

Introduction
The importance of customers for business firms has created tough ‘rivalries’ among competitors over acquiring new customers or retaining/expanding relationship with current ones. In particular, customer knowledge has been utilized as a key strategic resource and distinctive core competency to gain sustainable competitive advantage following the transformation of organizations from ‘product-centric’ to ‘customer-centric’ ones. The advancements in electronic and web-enabled systems coupled with accelerations in globalization, competitive environments, and changing customer’s preferences have created new challenges as well as opportunities for leveraging customer knowledge (CK) competencies.

Objectives
Customer-Centric Knowledge Management (CCKM) is needed in order to build good customer relations, continue to serve each customer in his or her preferred way, and to maintain customer satisfaction and loyalty. It includes the management of processes and techniques used to collect information regarding customers' needs, wants, and expectations for the development of new and/or improved products/services.

This book intends to address managerial and technical aspects of customer-centric knowledge implementation. It seeks to expand the literature and business practices and to create a very significant academic value to the dynamic and emerging fields of organizational knowledge management, customer relationship management, and information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Target Audience
This book seeks to offer audiences of business/IT academics and practitioners a refreshed and an enhanced view of research ideas in customer knowledge management.

Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

Customer Knowledge

  • Generation
  • Sharing
  • Implementation


Customer–Centric Knowledge Management
Strategic Analysis

  • Design and Development
  • The Role of People
  • The Role of Technologies
  • The role of Processes
  • Delivery Channels
  • Supply Chains
  • Organizational Learning
  • Organizational Change
  • Communities of Practice/Creation
  • Performance Metrics
  • Project Management
  • e-Commerce
  • e-Governmental

Submission Procedure
Academics, researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before March 15, 2010, a 2-3 page chapter proposal clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Authors of accepted proposals will be notified on or before March 30, 2010 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by June 30, 2010. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.

Publisher
This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference” and “IGI Publishing” imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2011.

Important Dates
March 15, 2010: Proposal Submission Deadline
March 30, 2010: Notification of Acceptance
June 30, 2010: Full Chapter Submission
September 30, 2010: Review Results to Authors
October 30, 2010: Revised Chapter Submission
November 15, 2010: Final Acceptance Notifications

Inquiries and submissions can be forwarded electronically (Word document) or by mail to:

Prof. Minwir Al-Shammari
Director, Graduate Studies Program
College of Business Administration
University of Bahrain
P.O Box 32038, Sakhir
Kingdom of Bahrain

Fax: (+973) 17-449-776
Email: minwir@yahoo.com

As a result of globalization, migration and international mobility of human resources are of growing relevance (OECD, 2015). Many individual factors drive this increasing mobility, such as the desire for adventure, higher quality of life, compensation, career, and family or personal ties (e.g. Al Ariss et al., 2013; Cerdin, Diné and Brewster, 2014; Doherty, Dickmann and Mills, 2011; Froese and Peltokorpi, 2013; Hippler, 2009; Selmer and Lauring 2011). Externally, the joint influence of the global economic climate, demographic changes, and geopolitical crises have been triggering the phenomena (OECD, 2015). At the same time, the domestic context in which many business organizations operate is becoming more complex and dangerous, mainly due to the threat of natural disasters, war, violent conflicts, crime, civil unrest, and terrorism (Bader, Schuster and Dickmann, 2015). Therefore, an increasing number of people are engaging in roles and jobs that involve mobility under higher danger and risk, such as military, health, emergency and rescue service providers, development aid volunteers and peacekeepers, journalists, diplomats, religious missionaries etc. Until now, we know only little about how the intensification of risks affects international mobility. Previous research has focused on the physical and psychological hazards of certain occupational groups, such as military (e.g. Kelly, Hutchings and Pinto, 2015) and war journalists/correspondents (e.g. Feinstein, Owen and Blair, 2002); other studies have considered the HRM issues of hostile settings (e.g. Bader and Schuster, 2015, Reade and Lee, 2012), highlighting the reality that terrorism-related threats can cause stress and impair expatriates’ attitudes and performance (Bader and Berg, 2013).

Despite these contributions and recent developments in the understanding of multiple forms of international mobility (Mayrhofer and Reiche, 2014; Shaffer et al., 2012), little is known about the people who work in dangerous and remote areas, such as offshore, war zones, humanitarian, and emergency settings. Therefore, this special issue aims at attracting scholarly research that contributes to the knowledge about (1) the dangerous settings (profit and non-profit) in which international mobility occurs, (2) the dangerous occupations (skilled or less-skilled) involving permanent, long-term or short-term international mobility, (3) the individual antecedents and outcomes related to these dangerous assignments, and (4) the organizational policies and practices aimed at managing these dangerous assignments.

Original quantitative and qualitative empirical research, theory development, case studies, and critical literature reviews from multiple disciplines (e.g. sociology, psychology, occupational health, migration, international travelling, risk and safety management, etc.) are appropriate for potential inclusion in this special issue. Also, multi-level approaches are particularly sought to accommodate individual, organizational, and societal perspectives. The following list of topics and research questions illustrate the aims and scope of the special issue. Please note that this list is not exhaustive and other ideas are welcome as well:

•       Dangerous and extreme settings: What can we learn from the most frequent threats of dangerous international contexts, such as war and conflict scenarios, peacekeeping, humanitarian and health international assistance etc.? How can permanent threats be managed and overcome?

•       Dangerous and extreme occupations: What are the most frequent forms of dangerous and extreme occupations in the context of international mobility? To what extent does the understanding of these occupations advance our theorization of international work and mobility?

•       Danger and risk – individual antecedents: What are the main motivations and requirements of accepting dangerous international assignments? What effects do intrinsic motives (e.g. a specific calling, a religious duty, etc.) and extrinsic motives (e.g. compensation, career advancement, etc.) have on the acceptance, outcome and repetition of these assignments?

•       Danger and risk – individual outcomes: How do individuals cope with dangerous international assignments, related to different aspects such as decision-making, family, work-life interface, work identity, compensation, career implications etc.? What are the differences in the underlying psychological processes, such as adjustment, commitment (organizational and occupational), and satisfaction of the workers in dangerous international assignments?

•       Danger and risk – beyond the individual: How do family members handle the separation or the move into dangerous settings? What are the social networks established in the dangerous host location? How do individuals and/or family members cope, over the short and long-term, with extreme outcomes, such as injury, illness, burnout, disability, or death?

•       Danger and risk – organizational policies and practices: What are an organization’s reasons to assign people in dangerous locations? What are the human resource management policies and practices aimed to attract, select, and prepare people for dangerous international assignments? What are the challenges associated with multiple reassignments? What are the main hardship policies and practices in view of accident, illness, death, kidnapping etc.? To what extent can for-profit organizations and multinational corporations (MNCs) learn from the organizational policies and practices of the non-profit organizations (NPO’s) operating in dangerous and extreme contexts?

•       Danger and risk – the role of the employer: What is the organization’s ethical responsibility and under which conditions should assignments be terminated or not initiated in the first place? What is the employer’s duty of care required by law and social responsibility? How can employers guarantee safety for employees?

 

Submission Process and Timeline

To be considered for the special issue, manuscripts must be submitted no later than 30 November, 2016, 5:00pm Central European Time. Papers may be submitted prior to this deadline as well. Submitted papers will undergo a double-blind peer review process and will be evaluated by at least two reviewers and a special issue editor. The final acceptance is dependent on the review team’s judgments of the paper’s contribution on four key dimensions:

(1)   Theoretical contribution: Does the article offer novel and innovative insights or meaningfully extend existing theory in the field of global mobility?

(2)   Empirical contribution: Does the article offer novel findings and are the study design, data analysis, and results rigorous and appropriate in testing the hypotheses or research questions?

(3)   Practical contribution: Does the article contribute to the improved management of global mobility? 

(4)   Contribution to the special issue topic.

 

Authors should prepare their manuscripts for blind review according to the Journal of Global Mobility author guidelines, available at www.emeraldinsight.com/jgm.htm. Please remove any information that may potentially reveal the identity of the authors to the reviewers. Manuscripts should be submitted electronically at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jgmob. For enquiries regarding the special issue please contact any of the three Guest Editors, Luisa Pinto, at lhpinto@fep.up.pt; Benjamin Bader, at benjamin.bader@leuphana.de and Tassilo Schuster, at tassilo.schuster@fau.de.

 

References

Al Ariss, A., Koall, I., Mustafa, Ö. and Vesa, S. (2013), 'Careers of skilled migrants', Journal of Management Development, Vol. 32 No. 2, pp. 148-151.

Bader, B. and Berg, N. (2013), ‘An empirical investigation of terrorism-induced stress on expatriate attitudes and performance’, Journal of International Management, Vol. 19 No. 2, pp. 163-175.

Bader, B. and Schuster, T. (2015), 'Expatriate Social Networks in Terrorism-Endangered Countries: An Empirical Analysis in Afghanistan, India, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia', Journal of International Management, Vol. 21 No. 1, pp. 63-77.

Bader, B., Schuster, T. and Dickmann, M. (2015), 'Special issue of International Journal of Human Resource Management: Danger and risk as challenges for HRM: how to manage people in hostile environments', The International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 26 No.15, pp. 2015-2017.

Cerdin, J. L., Diné, M. A. and Brewster, C. (2014), 'Qualified immigrants’ success: Exploring the motivation to migrate and to integrate', Journal of International Business Studies, Vol. 45 No. 2, pp. 151–168.

Doherty, N., Dickmann, M. and Mills, T. (2011), 'Exploring the motives of company-backed and self-initiated expatriates', The International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 22 No. 3, pp. 595-611.

Feinstein, A., Owen, J. and Blair, N. (2002), 'A Hazardous Profession: War, Journalists, and Psychopathology', American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 159 No. 9, pp. 1570-1575.

Fisher, K., Hutchings, K. and Pinto, L. H. (2015), 'Pioneers across war zones: The lived acculturation experiences of US female military expatriates', International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Vol. 49, pp. 265–277.

Froese, F. J. and Peltokorpi, V. (2013), 'Organizational expatriates and self-initiated expatriates: differences in cross-cultural adjustment and job satisfaction', The International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 24 No.10, pp. 1953-1967.

Hippler, T. (2009), 'Why do they go? Empirical evidence of employees' motives for seeking or accepting relocation', The International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 20 No. 6, pp. 1381 - 1401.

Mayrhofer, W. and Reiche, S. B., (2014), ’Guest editorial: context and global mobility: diverse global work arrangements’, Journal of Global Mobility, Vol. 2 No. 2.

OECD (2015), International Migration Outlook 2015. Paris: OECD Publishing.

Reade, C. and Lee, H. J. (2012), ‘Organizational Commitment in Time of War: Assessing the Impact and Attenuation of Employee Sensitivity to Ethnopolitical Conflict’, Journal of International Management, Vol. 18 No. 1, pp. 85–101.

Selmer, J. and Lauring, J. (2011), 'Acquired demographics and reasons to relocate among self-initiated expatriates', The International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 22 No. 10, pp. 2055-2070.

Shaffer, M. A., Kraimer, M. L., Chen, Y. P. and Bolino, M. C. (2012), 'Choices, Challenges, and Career Consequences of Global Work Experiences', Journal of Management, Vol. 38 No. 4, pp. 1282-1327.

Divergence, Convergence, or Crossvergence in International Human Resource Management

Human Resource Management Review (HRMR) announces a call for papers for a special issue on “Divergence, Convergence, or Crossvergence in International Human Resource Management”.

The special issue is edited by Professor Akram Al Ariss (Université de Toulouse, Toulouse Business School) and Professor Yusuf Sidani (American University of Beirut, Olayan Business School).

a.alariss@tbs-education.fr

ys01@aub.edu.lb

Whether organizations and their HR practices are converging—becoming more similar—(convergence theory) or diverging in their practices (divergence theory) is a matter of intense scholarly interest. In their award-winning paper about values evolution, Ralston et al. (1993; 1997), proposed the crossvergence theory of values evolution. This perspective marked a departure from the traditional convergence/divergence theory of values formation. The convergence theory posited that values develop in sync with the prevailing technology in a particular society given the impact of technological development on other educational and institutional structures. As societies become more similar to one another in terms of industrialization and use of technology, values will eventually converge to Western capitalism, given that this is where most industrialization has traditionally occurred (Ralston, 2008). The divergence theory, on the other hand, argues that the socio-cultural influences are typically the prevailing forces that lead societal members to adopt specific values irrespective of other external drivers. The crossvergence theory argues instead that it is in fact a combination of sociocultural forces as well as “business ideology influences” that is the major force behind the formation of value systems. A similar term that has been coined in HR research is the “bounded convergence” perspective, which argues that HRM practices sometimes pursue hybrid models of HR (Zhang, 2012). 

Congruent to the above, this CFP invites scholars to explore these ideas in the realm of HR practices. To what extent do HR practices converge in line with what may be considered best practices in that regard, which are mainly developed in Western societies? Or is it the case that in any given society, sociocultural practices particular to that society have more impact in determining that society’s HR practices? Or are we instead witnessing a realization of the crossvergence theory, wherein a combination of factors molds HR practices. The crossvergence theory, as far as HR practices are concerned, has been understudied in HR scholarship. From the papers we are calling for, we would like to build an understanding of the trends of convergence/divergence/crossvergence of HRM processes and systems. Earlier HR research seems to be hinting at crossvergence in certain areas. Sidani and Al Ariss (2013), for example, suggest that MNCs operate in such a way that certain practices converge (given their global usage) while other practices diverge (given local contexts) thus leaning toward a crossvergence perspective. Brewster, Wood, and Brookes (2008) also find evidence of both similarities and differences in IHRM practices.  Brewster (2004) presents what he terms as “European perspectives on human resource management” suggesting the existence of institutional and cultural factors that do not conform to a pure convergence theory. Likewise, Rowley and Benson (2002) explore the difficulties and challenges facing HRM convergence theory in the Asian context (please refer to the SI in HRMR about the Chinese context, Zhang, 2012). Other contributions to HRMR also explore the existence of country/region-specific HR practices (for example Gooderham & Nordhaug, 2011; Huo, Huang, & Napier, 2002; Mayrhofer, Brewster, Morley, & Ledolter, 2011; Morley, 2004). The questions that we ask in this SI cover issues including to what extent we have a global HRM versus region-specific model of HR (North American model, European model, Asian model, Middle Eastern model, Nordic model, etc.)? Where do these systems meet and where do they part both in theory and in practice? In this special issue, we are interested in discourses that are currently present in the English language in various parts of the world. We are also interested in under-represented regions of the world, such as the Asian, African, and Latin American contexts in addition to other world experiences. We encourage researchers whose work entails investigating work practices in non-Western contexts to share their perspectives of HRM within their own contexts. The idea is to attract papers addressing these issues at the micro (i.e., individual and group) level with openness to the macro (organizational and societal) levels of analysis.


Some relevant questions (non-exhaustive list) are as follows:

  1. Are the assumptions of HRM that we understand in the West applicable in other world regions? What are the major concepts, models, and theories of HRM in those non-Western contexts and how do these enrich our understanding of divergence/convergence/convergence perspectives?
  2. What are some of the comparative features of HRM systems in different parts of the world, and at different levels of analysis?  What does this tell us about HRM and allied fields (e.g. organizational behavior, industrial/organizational psychology, labor relations)?
  3. What are the roles of individuals, groups, organizations, and institutions in creating similar or different approaches to HRM?
  4. How is HRM practiced in countries where most of the major employers are large government affiliated employers?  What differences do we see in such contexts in areas such as personnel selection, compensation, performance appraisal, attraction and retention, training and development, among others?
  5. HRM in Western contexts assumes a certain level of ‘rule of law’. How are HRM processes understood at the individual, group, and organizational levels where the rule of law is deficient or barely existent?
  6. What key new trends in HRM can be identified as international/global (e.g. Global Talent Management)? How do such trends stimulate empirical research, as well as critical examination of existing concepts, models, and theories?
  7. What is the impact of national cultures in developing a specific understanding for the role of HRM? Should we expect that variances along such dimensions (i.e. Hofstede, GLOBE etc.) would be reflected in different HR systems?

Consistent with HRMR’s scope, conceptual and theoretical papers are welcomed (not empirical). Papers should be submitted according to the journal’s guidelines:

http://ees.elsevier.com/humres/

Deadlines:

15th September 2014: Submit abstracts (maximum 1000 words) to the guest-editors.

15th October 2014:      Invitations to submit full papers will be sent out.

15th April 2015:           Submission of full papers for refereeing.

15th May 2015:            Authors will receive feedback.

15th September 2015: Full papers with revisions will be due.

2016:                           Journal volume to be published.

REFERENCES

Brewster, C. (2004). European perspectives on human resource management. Human Resource Management Review14(4), 365-382.

Brewster, C., Wood, G., & Brookes, M. (2008). Similarity, isomorphism or duality? Recent survey evidence on the human resource management policies of multinational corporations. British Journal of Management19(4), 320-342.

Gooderham, P., & Nordhaug, O. (2011). One European model of HRM? Cranet empirical contributions. Human Resource Management Review21(1), 27-36.

Huo, Y. P., Huang, H. J., & Napier, N. K. (2002). Divergence or convergence: a cross‐national comparison of personnel selection practices. Human Resource Management41(1), 31-44.

Mayrhofer, W., Brewster, C., Morley, M. J., & Ledolter, J. (2011). Hearing a different drummer? Convergence of human resource management in Europe—A longitudinal analysis. Human Resource Management Review21(1), 50-67.

Morley, M. J. (2004). Contemporary debates in European human resource management: Context and content. Human Resource Management Review,14(4), 353-364.

Rowley, C., & Benson, J. (2002). Convergence and divergence in Asian human resource management. California Management Review44(2).

Ralston, D. A. (2008). The crossvergence perspective: Reflections and projections. Journal of International Business Studies39(1), 27-40.

Ralston, D. A., Holt, D. H., Terpstra, R. H., & Kai-Cheng, Y. (1997). The impact of national culture and economic ideology on managerial work values: A study of the United States, Russia, Japan, and China. Journal of International Business Studies, 177-207.

Ralston, D. A., Gustafson, D. J., Cheung, F. M., & Terpstra, R. H. (1993). Differences in managerial values: A study of US, Hong Kong and PRC managers. Journal of International Business Studies, 249-275.

Sidani, Y., & Al Ariss, A. (2013) Institutional and corporate drivers of global talent management: Evidence from the Arab Gulf region. Journal of World Business (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jwb.2013.11.005.

Zhang, M. (2012). The development of human resource management in China: An overview. Human Resource Management Review22(3), 161-164.

Guest Editors: Professor Sanjoy Sircar, and Professor SK Shanthi, and Editorial Assistant: K. Srinivasa Reddy (ismo.special@gmail.com).

Key benefits to the authors: There is one best paper award, which will be awarded by the Guest Editors of this issue of ISMO. The forthcoming issue of International Studies of Management & Organization (Ranked “B” in ABDC Rankings and Indexed in Scopus) focuses on Diversification Strategy of Firms in Emerging Economies and its objective is to shed light on uncovered strategic decisions of emerging-market firms in the existing international business (IB) literature. The concept of diversification strategy has been significantly investigated in developed market enterprises (DMEs), and covered topics such as related and unrelated firm performance, motives behind international diversification and cultural aspects. Corporate diversification was found to improve shareholders value in the short-run and enhances firm value in the long-run (e.g. Erdorf et al. 2013; Purkayastha et al. 2012). However, does diversification offer extra returns to the shareholders and improve the firm’s value in firms in emerging-markets? What are the determinants (motives) of emerging-market firms' diversification choice? Does diversification strengthen the firm competitiveness? Most of the studies conclude that diversification is the choice of top-level management for maximizing firm value and shareholders premium. Thus, a recent review on corporate diversification and firm value by Erdorf et al. (2013) concluded that firm’s value is influenced by industry-specific and macroeconomic factors, and that those factors may vary for different organizations. They also suggest that diversified firms, as compared with focused firms, seem to have higher returns, and tend to acquire discounted business divisions. Conversely, it is also argued that there is a growing amount of academic research on various aspects of management in emerging markets but few scholars have studied diversification-strategy using fewer samples (e.g. Mishra and Akbar 2007). Therefore, this issue will bridge the existing knowledge gap and will add knowledge to the IB literature on corporate diversification and firm value, especially of firms in emerging economies. With this backdrop, the guest editors invite scholars to submit their papers on the following themes or other related issues.

The papers can be conceptual, empirical, and case-study based.

  • Diversification, learning and resource-seeking
  • Costs and benefits of diversification strategy
  • Diversification of state-owned, public and private enterprises
  • Diversification and group affiliation (e.g. Khanna and Palepu 2000)
  • Concentric diversification and firm performance
  • Conglomerate diversification and firm performance
  • Market expansion, product diversification and firm performance
  • Determinants of concentric vs. conglomerate diversification
  • Diversification announcements and shareholders value creation
  • Diversification of firms within emerging markets/developed, and comparison
  • Diversification of family-business enterprises
  • Diversification of small- and medium-sized enterprises
  • Private equity investments, acquisitions and diversification
  • Diversification and its effect on capital structure
  • Diversification and firm competitiveness
  • Diversification and corporate governance
  • Cross-border diversification strategies and firm performance (e.g. Donnelly 2013; Luo and Tung 2007)
  • Critical aspects and risks in corporate diversification
  • Comparative studies with reference to above themes

Case studies development and analysis (Single or Multi) Submission and Publication Information:

Submission of First Draft via e-mail: 30 April, 2014

First round review comments returned to authors: 30 September, 2014

Resubmission of First-round selected papers via e-mail: 31 December, 2014

Second round review comments returned to authors (If necessary): 28 February, 2015

Final Decision: 31 March, 2015 Number of papers: 4 to 6 papers

Submission guidelines: The papers should confer with the theme. It is advised that there is a greater interest in selecting papers, which are comparative, empirical and case-study based. The papers must be relevant to theory testing/development, and/or policy implications. Further, authors should submit their papers in structured format that includes abstract, introduction, literature review, methodology, results and discussions and conclusions. (http://www.mesharpe.com/journal_info/IMOcontrib_guidelines.pdf). Please do not hesitate to contact the Editorial Assistant for more information.

References: Donnelly, N. 2013. “The Emergence and Internationalization of Irish MNEs – Exploring “Small Country Effects.” International Studies of Management & Organization 43(1): 26-51. Erdorf, S.: T. Hartmann-Wendels: N. Heinrichs, and M. Matz. 2013. “Corporate Diversification and Firm Value: A Survey of Recent Literature.” Financial Markets and Portfolio Management 27(2): 187-215. Khanna, T., and K. Palepu. 2000. “Is Group Affiliation Profitable in Emerging Markets? An Analysis of Diversified Indian Business Groups.” Journal of Finance 55(2): 867-891. Luo, Y., and R. L. Tung. 2007. “International Expansion of Emerging Market Enterprises: A Spring Board Perspective.” Journal of International Business Studies 38(4): 481-498. Mishra, A., and M. Akbar. 2007. “Empirical Examination of Diversification Strategies in Business Groups: Evidence from Emerging Markets.” International Journal of Emerging Markets 2(1): 22-38. Purkayastha, S.: T. S., Manolova: and L. F. Edelman. 2012. “Diversification and Performance in Developed and Emerging Market Contexts: A Review of the Literature.” International Journal of Management Reviews 14(1): 18-38.

Special Issue Editors

Deadline for submission:  June 30, 2015

INTRODUCTION

Headquarters (HQ) activities have long been a subject of research in management, strategy, and international business. This research focuses on activities such as control and coordination of subunits, resource allocation, conflict resolution, the orchestration of innovations, and many more sometimes subsumed under the term “parenting” activities.

Interestingly, recent empirical evidence suggests that firms seem to use increasingly fine-grained and complex approaches to organize their HQ activities and they increasingly locate these activities abroad. For example, Desai (2009: 1284) formulates that we are now witnessing firms that are “Bermuda-incorporated, Paris-headquartered (...), listed on the NYSE [New York Stock Exchange] with US-style investor protections and disclosure rules, a chief information officer in Bangalore, a chief finance officer in Brussels and a chief operating officer in Beijing”. What seems to emerge is a picture where not only regular value chain activities are increasingly “disaggregated” and “dispersed” (cf. Contractor, Kumar, Kundu, and Pedersen, Journal of Management Studies Special Issue, 2010) but where this applies also to HQ activities.

Although much is known of individual HQ units (e.g. corporate HQs) and individual HQ activities, we believe that these recent trends have not been focused upon sufficiently in extant research. Furthermore, extant research is relatively silent regarding the overall structuring of HQ activities. In fact, much of the empirical and theoretical work in the past has used a relatively simple concept of the HQ frequently viewing it as a single, identifiable unit at the apex of the organization at one particular location. This work has produced very valuable insights but the assumption of the HQ as a single, identifiable unit located at one particular location seems to be increasingly at odds with reality.
What is the impact of relaxing this assumption for our theories that explain vertical relationships within firms, the way how hierarchy functions, and the way how responsibilities are distributed between headquarters and subunits? Given the trend towards more disaggregated and dispersed HQ activities we may suffer from a reductive fallacy that impairs our understanding of the way contemporary firms are managed.

The objective of this special issue is to address the lack of attention to such complex HQ configurations. The contributions we envision would have to explicitly break with the dominant literature viewing the HQ as a single, identifiable unit located at one specific location. We call for contributions to the special issue that could significantly enhance our understanding around the nature and the consequences of complex HQ configurations, building on the notion of increasing disaggregation and dispersion that we borrow from the extensive work on value chain activities.
While we are interested in gaining a deeper understanding of the phenomenon we are also interested in receiving manuscripts that make substantial theoretical contributions. That is, we think that many theories could benefit from being exposed to the complexity of contemporary HQ configurations which allows for testing, verifying, and fine-tuning of these theories.
Note that we do not favor any particular epistemological or theoretical perspective and we wish to attract a diverse range of papers. We anticipate submissions focusing on a variety of analysis levels. We also think that the Special Issue topic is conducive to multilevel methodologies. Thus, investigations could focus on and combine HQ activity levels such as corporate HQs, divisional HQs, executive teams, individual HQ or subunit managers, or the entire HQ system. Questions that papers might explore include, but are not limited to:

Determinants and nature of complex configurations of HQ activities

  • What are the circumstances under which complex HQ configurations occur more frequently?
  • Are there institutional or industry-specific pressures for particular types of configurations?
  • How and why do HQ configurations evolve over time?
  • How are complex HQ configurations linked to a firm’s boundary decisions?

Value-creation (or destruction) by complex HQ configurations

  • How are value-adding functions, including coordination, control, and entrepreneurial roles, influenced?
  • How do geographically distant divisional headquarters activities complement corporate-level headquarters activities and how is this coordinated?
  • How do dispersed executive teams coordinate their work to influence their businesses? How are potential drawbacks of such configurations kept at bay?
  • What is the role played by temporarily assigned headquarters-roles to specific subunits such as centers of excellence?
  • What are the potential parenting advantages and disadvantages of complex HQ configurations?
  • How does the changing configuration of HQ activities shape corporate vs. decentralized strategic initiatives and attention-processes?
  • How are inter-dependencies between dispersed HQ activities managed?

Consequences of complex HQ configurations

  • How does the level of complexity of the HQ configuration influence HQ-subsidiary relationships in multinational companies?
  • How are internal dynamics in the firm, such as resource allocation or internal bargaining processes, affected?
  • What is the effect of institutional distances between HQ activities on the legitimacy of the headquarters both within and outside the firm? How does this influence modes of control or the adoption of corporate practices?
  • How are information asymmetries, principal-agent relationships, or parenting capabilities affected by disaggregation and dispersion of HQ activities?

 

SUBMISSION PROCESS AND DEADLINES

The deadline for submissions is June 30, 2015

Manuscript Development Workshop

  • The guest editors of this special issue are planning to hold a manuscript development workshop on January 28-29, 2016 in Vienna, Austria.
  • Those authors who receive an invitation for an R&R will be invited to attend this workshop.
  • Please note that the participation at the workshop does not guarantee acceptance of the paper in the special issue. Furthermore, attendance is also not a prerequisite for publication.

Guest editors

Shasha Zhao, Middlesex University, London, United Kingdom
Paul N Gooderham, NHH Norwegian School of Economics, Bergen, Norway 
Anne-Wil Harzing, Middlesex University, London, United Kingdom
Marina Papanastassiou, Middlesex University, London, United Kingdom

About critical perspectives on international business

The mission of cpoib is to exclusively support critical reflections on the nature and impact of contemporary international business (IB) activities around the globe from inter-, trans- and multidisciplinary perspectives. The journal places a special emphasis on scholarly works that question the hegemony of multinational enterprises (MNEs) and evaluate the effects of their IB activities on the global economy and national societies.

Scope and Rationale of the Special Issue

CPOIB invites the submission of articles that address the theme: “Do Multinational Enterprises Contribute to, or Reduce Global Inequality?”. The term ‘inequality’ refers to various societal and economic phenomena inside or across nation states, such as income, gender, social class, economic conditions, welfare, as well as other wider developmental issues. 

Although the relationship between nation states and MNEs has been historically important, dominant IB thinking has traditionally paid considerably greater attention to firm level factors of MNEs such as strategy, structure, and performance. With some exceptions such as Ackroyd and Murphy (2013), Lee and Gereffi (2015), and Roberts and Dörrenbächer (2016), IB scholars have shown relatively sparse interest in the societal, economic, and cultural consequences of the emergence and growth of MNEs. However, a recent study by Piketty (2014) suggests that the world is witnessing rising inequalities in both advanced and emerging economies, a reversal of the post Second World War trend towards greater equality and integration. A critical question worth asking is what role (if any) MNEs play in the development of this trend. In April 2017 this question was a core plenary theme at the Academy of International Business UKI Chapter Conference. Panelists and delegates were divided on the issue, but several presenters argued that MNEs operating in contexts of institutional voids generally generate significant inequality. 

MNEs are facing an increasingly competitive and crowded global market, which has led to a rapid expansion of dispersed value-chain activities in search of greater and more sustainable competitive advantages. Two related developments contribute to the necessity and opportunity for greater dispersion. At the firm level, we see an intensified exercise by MNEs to fine-slice and (re)locate global value-chain activities to the most advantageous locations (Buckley 2009; Mudambi and Santangelo, 2016). At the country level, we note dynamic and heterogeneous shifts in market and institutional conditions of home and foreign nation states. For instance, some recent evidence shows that, for the first time in history, a significant growth in advanced-economy MNE innovation investment is taking place in emerging economies (Awate et al., 2015; Jha et al., 2015). This is predominantly due to institutional improvements in these countries and preferential government policies for promoting and supporting innovation activities (Liu et al., 2011). Similarly, continuous technological development and changes in manufacturing capabilities in the case of advanced economies as well as improvement in market and institutional conditions in the case of emerging economies are seen to create new learning and growth opportunities for emerging-economy MNEs. UNCTAD (2015) reports that the largest outward investment from emerging economies to advanced economies as well as other emerging economies has occurred in the past five years. As such, nation states around the world are experiencing the most extensive and dynamic MNE activities in their local territories to date (Clougherty et al., 2017). 

However, negative outcomes of MNE activities are increasingly noted. For instance, MNEs that were once trusted are found to act illegitimately across host countries. A recent case is the Volkswagen ‘Dieselgate’. In September 2015, the company admitted to cheating official environmental standard requirements by installing software inside each vehicle to falsify system information (Howe, 2015). A survey initiated by Legatum Institute London, an international think tank for promoting policies to address poverty, reveals that the public holds largely negative views of MNEs (Withnall, 2015). The survey covered seven nations, including advanced (Britain, USA, and Germany) and emerging economies (Brazil, India, Indonesia, and Thailand) and revealed that 90 per cent of respondents believe MNEs are not ‘clean’ and a substantial majority agree that MNE actions in host countries contribute to a growing inequality gap. Some other worth noting examples include the case of Bangladesh where Lim and Prakash (2017) find that Western brand owners often pressurise local suppliers to fulfill orders, causing the suppliers to sustain wages to bare minimum and ignore extremely poor working conditions. This subsequently led to the collapse of a factory building where over 1,000 workers (mostly female) died. In the case of the UK, Taylor and Driffield (2005) find empirical evidence which shows that inward investment by MNEs leads to 11 per cent increase in wage inequality because of shift in demand for new labour skills. On the other hand, some positive cases remain. For example, in a similar study on wage and labour skill, but in the case of Ireland, Figini and Görg (1999) find that the rise in wage inequality because of inward investment is temporary and drops eventually. In the case of China, Greaney and Li (2016) find no evidence that MNEs are to be blamed for the prominent issue of urban-rural income inequality. 

Going beyond these scattered examples as to how MNEs contribute to inequality, this special issue seeks papers which conceptually or empirically advance the debate on the relationship between MNEs and inequality. Whilst papers that argue in favor of MNEs contributing to equality are welcome, we are particularly keen to see papers which offer new theoretical or empirical angles useful in discussing the role of MNEs in contributing to inequality.

Papers focusing on the following specific themes should consider submitting to the special issue

However the list is by no means exhaustive or restrictive:

  • Whether and how do MNEs contribute to (or reduce) inequality in income, gender, social class, economic development, welfare, or other wider developmental issues?
  • Whether and to what extent does MNEs’ foreign direct investment (FDI) impact on multi-level factors of host countries (macro-level: e.g. culture, institutions; micro-level: e.g. individual, family)?
  • Whether and how do MNEs contribute to (or reduce) subnational inequality in the case of emerging economies? What can be learnt from possible inter-regional differences?
  • Whether and how do MNEs contribute to (or reduce) subnational inequality in the case of advanced economies? What can be learnt from possible inter-regional differences?
  • What, if any, are the similarities or differences between advanced-economy MNEs and emerging-economy MNEs in terms of their contribution to (or reduction of) inequality? What can be learnt from these similarities or differences?
  • Whether and to what extent do emerging economies and advanced economies experience different or similar impact of MNE FDI activities? That is, do emerging economies benefit or suffer more in comparison to advanced economies, or vice versa?
  • What methodological challenges and solutions exist when collecting empirical data in relation to MNEs and inequality (and equality)? What are the methodological considerations when measuring impact of MNE activities in host economies?
  • What indigenous insights can enrich the existing literature on the relationship between MNEs and inequality to inform managerial practices and future research?
  • What are new conceptual or empirical insights into policy-making or managerial challenges in inequality reduction? What theoretical and practical lessons can be learnt from cases of a reduction or increase in inequality? What can be useful policy frameworks that effectively address the impact of MNEs on inequality? 

Submission Process and Deadlines

Submission Instructions

Deadlines

  • Submission deadline: 31st December 2017
  • Estimated publication date: late 2018 or early 2019

More Information

Enquiries about the special issue should be directed to the guest editors –

Shasha Zhao (s.zhao@mdx.ac.uk)
Paul N. Gooderham (Paul.Gooderham@nhh.no
Anne-Wil Harzing (anne@harzing.com
Marina Papanastassiou (m.papanastasiou@mdx.ac.uk)

References

Ackroyd, S. and Murphy, J. (2013) Transnational corporations, socio-economic change and recurrent crisis, Critical Perspectives on International Business, 9 (4): 336-357.
Awate, S., Larsen, M. M., and Mudambi, R. (2015) Accessing vs sourcing knowledge: A comparative study of R&D internationalization between emerging and advanced economy firms. Journal of International Business Studies, 46 (1): 63-86.
Buckley, P. J. (2009) The impact of the global factory on economic development. Journal of World Business, 44 (2): 131-143.
Clougherty, J. A., Kim, J. U., Skousen, B. R., and Szücs, F. (2017) The foundations of international business: Cross‐border investment activity and the balance between market‐power and efficiency effects. Journal of Management Studies, 54 (3): 340-365
Figini, P., and Görg, H. (1999) Multinational companies and wage inequality in the host country: The case of Ireland. Review of World Economics, 135 (4): 594-612.
Greaney, T.M. and Li, Y. (2017) Multinational enterprises and regional inequality in China Journal of Asian Economics, 48: 120–133 
Howe, B. (2015) Volkswagen scandal: 5 scary numbers, CNN Money, 4th November, accessed on 16/05/2017, [available at: http://money.cnn.com/2015/11/04/news/companies]
Jha, S., Dhanaraj, C., and Krishnan, R. (2015) How does multinational R&D evolve in emerging markets? Working Paper, International Institute for Management Development, 2015-02
Lee, J. and Gereffi, G. (2015) Global value chains, rising power firms and economic and social upgrading, Critical Perspectives on International Business, 11 (3/4): 319-339
Lim, S. and Prakash, A. (2017) Four years after one of the worst industrial accidents ever, what have we learned? The Washington Post, the monkey cage section, accessed on 12/05/2017, [available at https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage]
Liu, F. C., Simon, D. F., Sun, Y. T., and Cao, C. (2011) China's innovation policies: Evolution, institutional structure, and trajectory. Research Policy, 40(7): 917-931.
Mudambi, R., and Santangelo, G. D. (2016) From shallow resource pools to emerging clusters: The role of multinational enterprise subsidiaries in peripheral areas. Regional Studies, 50(12): 1965-1979.
Piketty, T. (2014) Capital in the Twenty-First Century, Harvard University Press: Cambridge, MA.
Roberts, J., and Dörrenbächer, C. (2016) Renewing the call for critical perspectives on international business: towards a second decade of challenging the orthodox. Critical Perspectives on International Business, 12(1): 2-21.
Taylor, K., and Driffield, N. (2005) Wage inequality and the role of multinationals: Evidence from UK panel data. Labour Economics, 12 (2): 223-249.
UNCTAD (2015) World Investment Report, United Nations Publications: Geneva
Withnall, A. (2015) 2 charts that show what the world really thinks about capitalism, The Independent, 3rd November, accessed on 14/05/2017, [available at: www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news]

About the Special Issue Editors

Shasha Zhao is Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) of International Business and Global Innovation at Middlesex University Business School, London. She received her Ph.D. from Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, UK, and previously held positions at Royal Holloway College, University of London, and Plymouth University, UK. Her research focuses on MNE subsidiary role, MNE innovation strategy, and impact of MNE FDI on host economies. Her research has been published in journals such as Human Resource Management Journal, and International Marketing Review. She also acts as a regular reviewer for a number of journals such as Asian Business & Management, Human Resource Management Journal, and Journal of Knowledge Management. Her latest research focuses on MNE innovation activities in emerging economies, and possible social and political implications. 

Paul N. Gooderham is Professor of International Management and Head of the Department of Strategy & Management at NHH: Norwegian School of Economics, Bergen. He is also an adjunct professor at Middlesex University. His research interests are concentrated on international and comparative management. He has published over 80 books, book chapters, and academic articles in journals such as Journal of World Business, Journal of Management, Journal of Management Studies, Journal of International Business Studies, Strategic Management Journal, Human Relations and Administrative Science Quarterly. Among his books are a co-authored textbook, International Management: Theory and Practice (Edward Elgar) published in 2013. Paul is on the senior advisory board of Journal of Organizational Effectiveness and a regular reviewer of journals including Journal of World Business, Human Resource Management Journal, and Human Relations. Since 1994, he has been a member of Cranet the largest comparative HRM research network in the world. 

Anne-Wil Harzing is Professor of International Management at Middlesex University, London. Previously, she was Professor and Associate Dean Research at the University of Melbourne, Australia. Her research interests include international HRM (e.g. gender issues), headquarter-subsidiary relationships, the role of language in international business, and the quality and impact of academic research. She has been an associate editor of management journals and a current editorial board member of 13 management journals including Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of World Business, and International Business Review. Anne-Wil has published more than 100 books, book chapters, and academic papers in journals such as Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of World Business, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Human Resource Management, Organization Studies, and Strategic Management Journal. More than a dozen of her articles have won research awards or distinctions. Anne-Wil has been listed on Thomson Reuter's Essential Science Indicators top 1% most cited academics in Economics & Business worldwide since 2007. 

Marina Papanastassiou is Professor of International Business and Innovation at Middlesex University Business School, London. She was also the Head of Department of International Management and Innovation at Middlesex University Business School (2014-16). Marina received her Ph.D. from the University of Reading and previously held positions such as research professor at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark and University of Athens, Greece. Her research focuses on MNE FDI strategy. Marina has published in a number of related journals including Journal of World Business, Management International Review, R&D Management, and Research Policy. Her latest research includes FDI in emerging economies. She is a regular reviewer of journals such as Management International Review, and R&D Management. She is also a Fellow of the European International Business Academy.


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Scholars, generally agree, that good governance influences national competitiveness. This, however, has not been documented and debating it has become an imperative scholarly task. How we manage our nation state or govern ourselves in a broad sociopolitical environment directly affect economic performance.

This issue has been underscored in the public forums conducted by the International Monetary Fund, United Nations, World Bank, World Economic Forum, etc. World Bank annually evaluates over 200 countries of the world with its governance indicators. World Economic Forum considers global governance as one of the major public discourse issue.

Possible topics are as follows.

  • Theoretical and empirical models explaining how governance affects competitiveness at macro (national) and micro (industry specific) level.
  • Understand governance as an independent, dependent or mediating construct—variables closely related to it are geopolitics, size of the nation, geographic location, globalization, democracy, economic freedom, environment or culture.
  • Policy measures governments could take for better governance resulting higher competiveness.
  • Methodological difficulties in measuring governance and its relationship with national competitiveness.
  • Influence of governance on international trade, direct investment, and production decisions of the multinational corporations.

The special issue aims at investigating the relationship between governance and competitiveness, and, offer policy suggestions. Authors are encouraged to submit both conceptual and empirical papers. Use APA Style in preparing the manuscript.

Submit manuscripts to the guest editor electronically via email at waheed@tamucc.edu. Authors from developing countries are especially encouraged to submit. Dr. Abu N. M. Waheeduzzaman is a Professor of Marketing and International Business, College of Business, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi.

East Asian Wisdom and its impact on business culture and performance in a cross-cultural context

Co Guest-Editors:

Chris Baumann, Macquarie University, Sydney Australia, and Seoul National University (SNU), Korea

Hume Winzar, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia 

Tony Fang, Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Sweden

Summary

There is growing recognition that we can learn a lot from the East to inspire and enrich our mainstream theory and practice (Chen, 2010a, 2010b). Can we make good use of East Asian wisdom in cross-cultural and strategic management? For example, the teachings of Confucius have allegedly contributed to remarkable economic growth across East Asia, and Western researchers have struggled for decades on what it means and how to leverage Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, and Yin Yang thinking into the generation of fresh theoretical and practical insights on research and business practices, respectively. It is not clear among commentators whether such perspectives are pure philosophy, religion, or ideology (Fingarette, 1972) or a combination thereof. In the context of cross-cultural management and strategy, how do these questions affect business culture and performance?

Hofstede and Bond’s study (1988) showed that countries in the Confucian orbit have experienced the fastest rate of growth since the 1950-60s. Winzar (2015) pointed out from the 1970s, Individualist economies (Europe and the US) outperformed Collectivist economies (China and Korea), and commentators argued that Collectivism holds Asian countries back. But by the 2000s similar commentators argued that Collectivism was responsible for the growth of the Tiger Economies. The situation has changed again as Chinese, Japanese and Korean technology (including innovation and, to a degree, brand building and management) now equal or exceed European and US companies on many measures. It has also been found that East Asia performs ahead of Europe, the rest of Asia, and South/Central America both academically (in terms of PISA) and in competitiveness (Baumann and Winzar, 2016). Much of our understanding of East-Asian cultures has been framed with Western-designed instruments (Fang, 2003), and too often we make broad conclusions along the lines of, for example, “Chinese managers are different from US managers, so Confucianism, and other orientations, must be responsible”. We make such broad inferences about the role of East Asian wisdom without attempting to “deconstruct” the construct. We can do better.

The discussion of the role of East Asian wisdom on management and related disciplines is not new. In this journal, several publications have paid attention to these issues, including Li’s (2016) theoretical explication of the Eastern Yin Yang frame and its application to paradox management, Fang’s (2012) conceptualization of culture in the age of globalization, as well as HR implications of Eastern values (Jiang, Gollan & Brooks, 2015; Chin, 2014), Western explorations of acculturation of expatriates and migrant managers in Asia (Selmer and Lauring, 2014), cultural differences and the aesthetics of product design (Shin, 2012), and ethical perspectives of Chinese and American managers (Pan et al. 2010). Elsewhere, we have seen seminal contributions on management practice in Confucian societies (Yeung and Tung, 1996), and important work on changing cultural values, behaviour and ethical conduct (Faure and Fang, 2008; Tung and Verbeke, 2010; Woods and Lamond 2011), along with valuable critical reviews highlighting the paradoxical nature of culture (Fang, 2003, 2006, 2010, 2012), the influence of Confucian perspectives on Western leadership and management education (Manarungsan and Tang, 2012), the implication of strategic thought in East Asian for business and management (Fang, 1999; Tung, 1994), and the evolution of institutional approaches to education more broadly (Baumann, Hamin and Yang, 2016). Further afield, in other disciplines, we see very comprehensive perspectives on the role of East Asian wisdom on political philosophy (Rozman, 1993), competitiveness and economic growth (Hofstede and Bond, 1988) and influences on Western philosophy generally (Wilhelm, 1972). Confucianism and countries in the ‘Confucian Orbit’ (Baumann, Hamin, Tung and Hoadley, 2016) have a new found focus in scholarly work on competitiveness, but equally so, scholars in multiple fields are curious about the roles of Daoism (Woolley, 2016), Buddhism (Vallabh and Singhal (2014) and Yin Yang (Fang, 2012).

For the purposes of cross-cultural and strategic management, is East Asian wisdom a social and psychological framework that may vary across different cultural groups, or is it a constant that is manifested in different ways according to economic and social conditions? For example, does it make sense to say that one group is “more Confucian” than another? Or on one dimension or another? If so, then how do we derive empirical measures of the various facets of Confucianism?

These and many other questions niggle at Western (and Eastern) scholars as they try to understand how to better communicate, conduct business and formulate strategies across countries.

Topics

We are interested in any and all articles, so long as they address issues relating to East Asian Wisdom and cross-cultural management and strategy.

Topics can include, but are not limited to:

  • Conceptualisation and measurement of aspects of East Asian Wisdom, such as Confucianism, at the individual (micro), group (meso), and national (macro) levels.
  • Historical interrelationships between East Asian Wisdom and PEST (Political, Economic, Social, Technological) environments – antecedent or consequent relationships.
  • Interrelationships between East Asian Wisdom and Management, Business, Performance and Competitiveness.
  • Differences in East Asian Wisdom in the East Asia Region (e.g. China, Japan, Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, Vietnam).
  • Differences in East Asian Wisdom among members of the East Asian diaspora – Contribution to intra-national diversity.
  • Mediating and/or moderating role of East Asian Wisdom in Cross-cultural research.
  • The role of East Asian Wisdom in the provision of services, product design and development.
  • The interplay between East Asian Wisdom and management and strategy.
  • Role of East Asian Wisdom (e.g., Yin Yang) in cross-cultural innovation and in the formation of competitiveness and economic outcomes.

East Asian Wisdom is multi-faceted and multi-layered, and we are interested in papers which address areas and concepts not usually found in the literature, or areas that are severely undeveloped or inaccurate in our current understanding. We are living in an era that has transitioned from “West leads East” to “West meets East” (Chen, 2010a, 2010b). Our theories and practices need to be and can be inspired by this historical transition.

Submission instructions

All manuscripts will undergo a double-blind review process. Submissions should be between 5,000-9,000 words, including references, figures and tables, and follow the manuscript requirement outlined on the journal’s website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm. The submission deadline is January 1, 2017. Please direct queries to: 

Associate Professor Chris Baumann, e mail: chris.baumann@mq.edu.au;

Associate Professor Hume Winzar, e mail: hume.winzar@mq.edu.au; and

Professor Tony Fang, Stockholm Business School, e-mail: tony.fang@sbs.su.se 

References

Baumann, C., Hamin, H., Tung, , R. L. and S. Hoadley, S. (2016), Competitiveness and workforce performance: Asia vis-à-vis the “West”, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 28 (11).

Baumann, C., H. Hamin and S. J. Yang (2016). "Work ethic formed by pedagogical approach: evolution of institutional approach to education and competitiveness." Asia Pacific Business Review, 22 (3).

Baumann, C., and Winzar, H. (2016). The role of secondary education in explaining competitiveness. Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 36 (1).

Chen, M.-J. (2010a). West Meets East: Enlightening, balancing, and transcending. Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management. June 14, http://aom.org/Meetings/annualmeeting/past-meetings/theme2011.aspx

Chen, M.-J., & Miller, D. (2010b). West meets East: Toward an ambicultural approach to management. Academy of Management Perspectives, 24(4): 17-24.

Chin, T. (2014). "Harmony as means to enhance affective commitment in a Chinese organization." Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal 21(3): 326-344.

Fang, T. (1999). Chinese business negotiating style. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Fang, T. (2003). "A Critique of Hofstede’s Fifth National Culture Dimension." International Journal of Cross Cultural Management 3(3): 347-368.

Fang, T. (2006). From “Onion” to “Ocean”: Paradox and Change in National Cultures. International Studies of Management and Organizations 35(4): 71-90.

Fang, T. (1999): Chinese Business Negotiating Style. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Fang, T. (2010). Asian management research needs more self-confidence: Reflection on Hofstede (2007) and beyond. Asia Pacific Journal of Management 27: 155-170.

Fang, T. (2012). Yin Yang: A new perspective on culture. Management and Organization Review, 8(1): 25-50.

Faure, G. O., & Fang, T., (2008). Changing Chinese values: Keeping up with paradoxes. International Business Review, 17(2): 194-207.

Fingarette, H. (1972). Confucius -- The Secular as Sacred, New York: Harper and Row

Hofstede, G. and M. H. Bond (1988). "The Confucius connection: From cultural roots to economic growth." Organizational Dynamics 16(4): 5-21.

Li, P. P. (2016). "Global implications of the indigenous epistemological system from the east: How to apply Yin-Yang balancing to paradox management." Cross Cultural & Strategic Management 23(1): 42-77.

Jiang, Z., P. J. Gollan and G. Brooks (2015). "Moderation of Doing and Mastery orientations in relationships among justice, commitment, and trust: A cross-cultural perspective." Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal 22(1): 42-67.

Manarungsan, S. and Z. Tang (2012). “Integrating Oriental Wisdom in MBA Education: The Case of Confucianism.” Leadership through the Classics. G. P. Prastacos, F. Wang and K. E. Soderquist, Springer Berlin Heidelberg: 377-387

Pan, Y., X. Song, A. Goldschmidt and W. French (2010). "A cross‐cultural investigation of work values among young executives in China and the USA." Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal 17(3): 283-298.

Vallabh, P., & Singhal, M. (2014). “Buddhism and decision making at individual, group and organizational levels.” Journal of Management Development, 33(8/9), 763-775.

Rozman, G., Ed. (1993). The East Asian Region - Confucian Heritage and Its Modern Adaptation, Princeton Univ. Press.

Selmer, J. and J. Lauring (2014). "Self-initiated expatriates: An exploratory study of adjustment of adult third-culture kids vs. adult mono-culture kids." Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal 21(4): 422-436

Shin, D. H. (2012). "Cross‐analysis of usability and aesthetic in smart devices: what influences users' preferences?" Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal 19(4): 563-587

Tung, , R. L.  (1994). Strategic Management Thought in East Asia. Organizational Dynamics, 22(4): 55 -65. 

Tung, R. L. and A. Verbeke (2010). "Beyond Hofstede and GLOBE: Improving the quality of cross-cultural research." Journal of International Business Studies 41(8): 1259-1274.

Tung, R. L. and C. Baumann (2009). "Comparing the attitudes toward money, material possessions and savings of overseas Chinese vis-à-vis Chinese in China: convergence, divergence or cross-vergence, vis-à-vis ‘one size fits all’ human resource management policies and practices." The International Journal of Human Resource Management 20(11): 2382-2401

Wilhelm, R., (1972). Confucius and Confucianism: Translated into English by George H. Danton and Annina Periam Danton. Routledge & Kegan Paul.

Winzar, H. (2015). "The ecological fallacy: How to spot one and tips on how to use one to your advantage." Australasian Marketing Journal 23(1): 86-92

Woods, P. and D. Lamond (2011). "What Would Confucius Do? – Confucian Ethics and Self-Regulation in Management." Journal of Business Ethics 102(4): 669-683

Woolley, N. (2016). The Emergence of Daoism: Creation of a Tradition, By Gil Raz. Routledge Studies in Taoism. London: Routledge, 2012 (paper 2014). Religious Studies Review, 42(1), 58-58.

Yeung, I. Y. M. and R. L. Tung (1996). "Achieving Business Success in Confucian Societies: The Importance of Guanxi (Connections)." Organizational Dynamics 25(2): 54-65

Invitation to submit articles for the upcoming

Vol. 3 No 1. Spring 2016 issue

Submission Deadline:  January 17, 2016

The Journal of Eastern European and Central Asian Research (JEECAR) is a multi-disciplinary, scholarly, high quality, double-blind peer-reviewed journal, with topics concerning:

  • Economics
  • Finance
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • International Affairs

The main focus is in the Eastern European and Central Asian business and national political economies. The Journal is registered by the Library of Congress, listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), indexed with EBSCO, Ulrich, Google Scholar, OAI WorldCat Digital Collection, included in the EconBib index, and evaluated for an Impact Factor by CiteFactor.org, and each article has assigned an individual CrossReff DOI address.

The Editorial Board consists of distinguished experts among academics and practitioners who specialize in business topics within the Easter European and Central Asian regions. The latest journal issue with articles can be obtained online at: http://ieeca.org/journal/index.php/JEECAR/issue/archive.

The primary focus of the Journal is to provide an intellectual forum in theory, as well as practice, and to explore issues relevant to newly emerging nations. Submissions may include theoretical issues, new business model ideas, methodological issues, empirical studies, or case studies in the field of enterprise management or new developments of multinational corporations in the specific global economies.

Complete information about the submission guidelines is available at the JEECAR website: http://ieeca.org/how-to-submit-article

The JEECAR journal is published by the Institute of Eastern Europe and Central Asia with the support and cooperation of Webster University in St. Louis, MO.

 

Nikolay Megits, Ph.D.

Editor-in-Chief

Journal of Eastern European and Central Asian Research

ISSN 2328-8272 (print)

ISSN 2328-8280 (online)

nmegits@ieeca.org

China’s success in integrating itself into the world economy has attracted worldwide attentions. Developing nations are particularly impressed with the way that China mobilizes its resources for rapid economic growth. China’s cautious and gradual approach to economic reform may provide useful experience to countries in economic transition. The outstanding performance of China’s economy in responding to the global financial crisis has been catalytic to the economic recovery in the United States and the European Union. To evaluate the sustainability of the emerging Chinese model of economic development an important aspect is to understand to what extent productivity growth has contributed to China’s spectacular economic growth in the past three decades. The Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies (JCEBS) henceforth calls for contributions to the 2011 Special Issue on Chinese Productivity.

The complexity and enormous scale of China’s economy require methodologies that can be used for systemic investigations of productivity performance. The special issue encourages empirical studies within the neo-classical framework of Solow, which is still considered as the core of modern growth theory in the literature. While imposing a basic structure on a macro economic model of general equilibrium nature, the Solow framework can be applicable to both well-developed market economies and planned economies. To accommodate significant differences in total factor productivity across countries and regions efforts in the exploration of its cross-sectional implications are also welcome.

The rapid economic growth in China would have not been possible had there not been the tremendous development of a vibrant Chinese business sector. China’s businesses have experienced an early stage of gradual reform in the state sector, followed by the dramatic expansion of the rural industries and a surge in the privatization of state and collective firms. While China was becoming the most attractive destination for foreign direct investment in the process, Chinese firms in recent years have started to acquire foreign companies and attempted to build up their own brand names. To make the presence of the Chinese firms sustainable internationally, innovation and productivity improvement are crucial to their continued success abroad. Submissions in the related areas of business studies will be appreciated.

In recent years, there seems to have been a consensus between scholars of growth empirics and applied productivity analysts that improving productivity estimations and better analysis to identify determinants of the productivity performance are the two areas to which major research efforts should be devoted. One direction we suggest is the study of the “knowledge production function.” This approach is to be attractive in an empirical sense that the techniques of applied productivity analysis might be effective in investigations on the determinants of innovation and economic growth.

China’s industrialization process has basically followed the historical path of the developed nations. However, the limitation of this traditional approach is that it exerts enormous pressure on the natural environment. In many circumstances, the environmental issues can be studied under the standard framework of applied productivity analysis, which is based on well-founded economic theory of production. Submissions of papers in this area are highly recommended.

Contributions concerning productivity performance of service and agricultural sectors are also very welcome. Papers comparing China and India or Brazil, the former Soviet Union or Russia, the United States or the European Union, and South and East Asia including Japan are particularly interesting to the special issue. Studies on trade and productivity with firm heterogeneity, structural time series models of aggregate productivity, and real business cycle related productivity issues are all suitable for submission.

Papers should be submitted in Word or PDF format via email to Jinghai Zheng (Guest Editor) Department of Economics University of Gothenburg Sweden
Email: Jinghai.Zheng@gmail.com<mailto:Jinghai.Zheng@gmail.com>

Submitted papers will normally be reviewed by two independent referees as well as by the Guest Editor. Deadline for submission is 20th May 2010.

Growing economic inequality in society has become a serious concern for both developed and developing countries. This special issue is based on the premise that a better understanding of the relationship between business and society is possible by examining it within the context of rising economic inequality. We are interested in a broad range of issues focused on linking business, society, and economic inequality.

Organizational research devoted to examining the firm-inequality relationship is at a very nascent stage and needs to draw on established research in other disciplines, as well as develop new theories by making broad connections between previously unexamined phenomena. Similarly, empirical examinations might have to make use of publicly available data and established methods, as well as creatively generate new data and methods to study this complex phenomenon. Therefore, we invite conceptual and empirical papers that offer substantial potential to result in high quality publications.

SUBMISSION PROCESS AND DEADLINES

Interested authors are encouraged to submit a 6-page proposal (excluding references and exhibits) to Hari Bapuji (inequalitysi.2014@gmail.com) through email by November 30, 2014. The guest editors will provide developmental feedback and invite authors of suitable proposals to submit a full paper to the special issue. In addition, potential authors may contact any of the guest editors to discuss initial ideas for papers. While interested authors are encouraged to make use of the guidance of the guest editors before submitting full papers, full papers may be submitted (and will be equally welcomed) even without prior consultation with guest editors.

The deadline for submission of all full papers (including papers that received feedback on their proposals) will be June 30, 2015.Authors should submit their manuscripts through ScholarOne Manuscripts at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/bas. Manuscripts should be prepared following the Business and Society author guidelines: http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal200878/manuscriptSubmission.

Submission Deadline: December 31, 2016

Guest Editor: Abu Waheeduzzaman, Ph.D.

The Journal of Euromarketing is the official Journal of the International Management Development Association (IMDA) published by IMDA Press. It is a premier publication outlet in international marketing with a focus on Europe, emerging nations and other countries. It serves the academics, practitioners, and public policymakers on issues pertaining to marketing and related disciplines.

Economic integration can be achieved at three levels: (1) global level under WTO, (2) regional level through in various regions of the world (e.g., EU, NAFTA, ASEAN, MERCOSUR, or TPP), and (3) bilateral level between nations through free trade agreements. Manuscripts pertaining to integration and marketing at all three levels are welcome.

Possible topics are as follows.

  • Investigate how economic integration affects marketing at macro (national) and micro (industry specific) level. Relate geopolitics, size of the nation, geographic location, globalization, democracy, economic freedom, environment or culture to the phenomenon.
  • Discuss the effect of “trade creation” and “trade diversion” in marketing.
  • Determine the effect of economic integration on international trade, direct investment, and marketing decisions of the multinational corporations.
  • Examine the relationship between integration and various concepts in marketing, viz., country of origin, consumption convergence, standardization-adaptation, or marketing productivity.
  • Offer policy suggestions for business and governments pertaining to integration and marketing. Is more integration good for marketing?
  • Study methodological issues in measuring economic integration and relate them to marketing.

The Special Issue on Economic Integration and Marketing invites manuscripts focusing on the impact of economic integration in marketing. The manuscripts should be no longer than 9000 words, double spaced (including references, tables, figures and abstracts) with a margin of at least one inch (2.54 cm) on all sides. Each manuscript has to be accompanied by a statement that it has not been published and has not been submitted simultaneously for publication elsewhere. Authors are responsible for obtaining permission to reproduce copyrighted material from other sources. All accepted manuscripts, artwork, and photographs become the property of the publisher. Authors are encouraged to submit both conceptual and empirical papers. Use APA Style in preparing the manuscript. Submit manuscripts to the guest editor electronically via email at waheed@tamucc.edu. Hard copy submissions can also be sent to the following address. Authors from emerging and developing nations are encouraged to submit. Abu N. M. Waheeduzzaman, Ph.D. College of Business Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi 6300 Ocean Drive, OCNR 319, Unit 5808 Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 USA

Special issue guest editors

Cristiano Bellavitis (Higher School of Economics, National Research University)

Igor Filatotchev (Cass Business School, City University London, and Vienna University of Economics and Business)
Dzidziso Samuel Kamuriwo (Cass Business School, City University London)
Tom Vanacker (Ghent University)

Introduction

Entrepreneurial firms are the backbone of economies and drivers of both economic development and employment. Young and innovative entrepreneurial firms are germane to the creation, development and growth of new technologies, industries and markets and create the most jobs. Yet, these firms often need considerable amounts of financial capital to sustain their growth. Over the last decades, the entrepreneurial finance literature emphasized the importance of business angels and venture capital investors.

However, despite the relevance of angel and venture capital financing, in recent years a whole set of relatively new sources of financing have emerged (e.g., Bruton, Khavul, Siegel and Wright, 2014). Entrepreneurs in science and technology start-ups can raise financing from numerous sources, such as accelerators and incubators, proof-of-concept centres, university-based seed funds, crowdfunding platforms, and IP-backed financial instruments. Moreover, contrary to common accounts of startup activity, research further shows that new entrepreneurial firms heavily rely on external debt sources, including bank financing (e.g., Robb and Robinson, 2014). Others argue that entrepreneurs can create and grow flourishing firms without raising the external financing that other firms consider to be essential, for instance, through financial bootstrapping and bricolage (e.g., Baker and Nelson, 2005; Winborg and Landström, 2001).

Considering the importance of entrepreneurial firms for the overall economic system, there is a need for research on these distinct sources of financing to understand how they impact start-ups (Fraser, Bhaumik and Wright, 2015). Extant research has only skimmed the surface in terms of exploring the ways (a) entrepreneurs rely on these relatively new sources of financing, (b) entrepreneurs use more traditional sources of financing (such as bank debt), which are typically assumed to be unavailable to early stage entrepreneurial firms, and (c) entrepreneurs use more or less creative strategies to realize “more with less”.

Furthermore, the entrepreneurial finance literature is largely segmented by the source of financing from which entrepreneurs obtain their financing. As highlighted by Cosh, Cumming and Hughes (2009) entrepreneurial finance studies focus, almost exclusively, on a single source of financing. Largely separate streams of literature have emerged in bank finance, lease finance, business angel finance, venture capital, private equity, supplier finance and more recently, crowdfunding. However, in practice, entrepreneurs often raise financing from a multitude of sources. Hence, we need a better understanding of how these various sources of financing interact and how different combinations support (or harm) entrepreneurial firms (Hanssens, Deloof and Vanacker, 2015).

Research topics
The special issue intends to further our knowledge of the latest trends in entrepreneurial finance, including the emergence of relatively new sources of finance, generally ignored sources of financing and strategies entrepreneurs can implement to realize more with less need for external financing. We also would like to explore how distinct sources of financing interrelate with each other and with more “classic” sources of entrepreneurial financing. We welcome papers adopting a multitude of methods, both empirical and theoretical contributions. Topics of interest include but are not restricted to the following:

  • What is the effect of being embedded in multiple funding networks to firm outcomes?
  • Are new sources of entrepreneurial financing going to replace or complement venture capital and angel finance? If so, how?
  • For which firms each funding source is more accessible?
  • What can firms do to increase the probability of raising new sources of entrepreneurial financing?
  • When and for which type of companies is each funding source more advantageous in boosting performance (e.g. survival, growth, M&A, IPO)?
  • And what is the ideal combination of funding sources for entrepreneurial firms performance?
  • How can entrepreneurs grow their firms without raising additional external financing?
  • Are there geographical differences in relation to entrepreneurial financing?
  • What sources of financing are available in developing countries?

Paper submission procedure

All submissions will be subject to the standard review process followed by Venture Capital: An International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance. All manuscripts must be original, unpublished works that are not under review for publication elsewhere. Papers for the Special Issue should be prepared and formatted according to the Journal’s Instructions to Contributors and should be sent as a Word file to: Cristiano Bellavitis, Higher School of Economics, National Research University, Russia at CBellavitis@hse.ru

Key dates

The deadline for the submission of papers is 31 December 2015. We expect the following timing in between initial submission and publication of the Special Issue:
- 31st of March 2016: Completion of first round reviews
- 30th of April 2016: Decisions notified to authors
- 30th of September 2016: Revised submissions due
The Special Issue is scheduled for publication in early 2017. To support the development of papers, the editorial team is available at AOM (Vancouver).

Over the last decade emerging market multinationals (EMNCs) have become important players in the world economy. This has led to increased interest in their behavior by academics and policy makers alike who are beginning to come to grips with the most important analytical and policy issues that affect the world economy due to the rise of EMNCs. A lively debate in the literature is discussing the applicability of lessons from the study of developed country multinationals to EMNCs, and the contributions that the study of EMNCs can offer to theories of the multinational enterprise in general.

Studies from developed economy multinationals recognize that both firm-specific and environmental factors help explain international diversification. Over the last decade, increasing attention has been given to the drivers of internationalization strategies of firms from emerging economies and evidence on the relationship between EMNCs’ competitive advantages and the nature of their internationalization strategies is beginning to emerge. In this context, extant literature has focused on aspects of home country environments as potential determinants of EMNCs’ advantages and internationalization processes. Erramilli, Agarwal and Kim (1997) observed “that firm-specific advantages are molded by home-country environment has received some empirical scrutiny and support.” Yet, there remain significant unresolved questions in the international business and strategic management literatures as to how the home environment of a firm impacts its international strategies and operations. The substantial increase in outward foreign direct investment from countries such as China and India emphasizes the importance of this question.

The global economy is shifting in ways that offer new opportunities and new challenges for firms from emerging economies. These firms often originate from institutional environments which are heterogenic and segmented, have co-evolved their structures and practices within idiosyncratic institutional environments, and need to overcome differences between diverse institutional settings in their foreign direct investments. These challenges are often compounded by limited organizational and managerial experience and capabilities to internationalize.

We believe that there are significant opportunities for improving our understanding of how home country environment affects various processes and outcomes that drive EMNCs, and thus to advance theories of the multinational enterprise. Consequently, we are soliciting empirical and theoretical work addressing these complex relationships between various forms of home country environmental heterogeneities and EMNCs. This special issue provides an opportunity to bring together the research of scholars from a diverse range of disciplinary traditions such as economics, sociology and political science. As such, the following list of potential research questions is merely illustrative of the broad range of studies that could fit in the special issue of Asia Pacific Journal of Management (APJM):

• How do EMNCs leverage political and social ties at home to gain access to and/or leadership in foreign markets, especially developed country markets?
• How do the institutional framework and the resource endowment of the home country influence the patterns and processes of organizational learning and capability building that enable investments abroad?
• From a co-evolutionary perspective, what are the dynamics of the interrelationship between institutional change and corporate strategy? How do EMNCs leverage their experience abroad to impact institutional development at home?
• What is the extent and modalities through which emerging market governments influence the operations of EMNCs?
• What distinguishes international investment strategies by state-owned by privately-owned EMNCs? Is government ownership enabler or liability in internationalization?
• What role do country of origin formal (regulatory) and informal (cultural) institutions play in pace of internationalization and degree of international commitments?
• How do governance structures, such as ownership and managerial incentives, affect internationalization decisions and the success or failure of overseas operations?

All papers are to be submitted to the APJM website http://apjm.edmgr.com. The deadline for receipt of papers for this special issue is December 1, 2013. The format of submissions must comply with submission guidelines posted at the APJM website, and we have a marked preference for submissions which debate with, extend, and/or refute the indicative literature cited below. Please indicate that your submission is to be reviewed for the Special Issue on Emerging Economy Multinationals (choose that in the “article type” item during the submission process).

Papers will be double-blind peer-reviewed. We will make initial editorial decisions by June, 2014. Authors invited to revise and resubmit their work will be invited to present the papers at the APJM special issue workshop to be held at the conference on “Emerging Economy Multinationals” at Copenhagen Business School in Copenhagen, Denmark.

The papers accepted and presented at the workshop will be considered for publication in a special issue of the APJM. Presentation at the workshop does not necessarily guarantee publication in the special issue. The combination of a workshop and a special issue nevertheless follows a highly successful APJM initiative to bring out the full potential of authors and papers. For questions about the special issue, please contact Bersant Hobdari, Guest Editor, at bh.int@cbs.dk.

Indicative Contemporary Literature

Bhaumik, S.K., Driffield, N. & Pal, S., 2010. Does ownership structure of emerging market firms affect their outward FDI? The case of the Indian automotive and pharmaceutical sectors, Journal of International Business Studies, 41: 437-450.
Boisot, M. & Meyer, W. 2008. Which way through the open door? Reflections on the internationalization of Chinese firms, Management and Organization Review 4(3): 349-366.
Buckley P.J., Clegg J., Cross A., Rhodes, H., Voss H. & Zheng, P. 2008. Explaining China's outward FDI: an institutional perspective', in: Sauvant, K. ed., The rise of transnational corporations from emerging markets, Cheltenham: Elgar.
Chen Y.Y. & Young, M.N. 2010. Cross-border mergers and acquisitions by Chinese listed companies: A principal–principal perspective, Asia Pacific Journal of Management 27(3): 523-539.
Cui, L. & Jiang, F. 2012. State ownership effect on firms’ FDI opwnership decisions under institutional pressure: A study of Chinese outward-investing firms, Journal of International Business Studies, online advance.
Dunning, J.H., 2006. Comment on ‘dragon multinationals: New players in 21st century globalization’, Asia Pacific Journal of Management 23, 139-142.
Erramilli, M. K., Agarwal S. & Kim S. 1997. Are Firm-Specific Advantages Location-Specific Too, Journal of International Business Studies 28(4), 735-757.
Filatotchev, I., Strange, R., Piesee, J. & Lien, Y.C. 2007. FDI by firms from newly industrialized economies in
emerging markets: Corporate governance, entry mode and location, Journal of International Business Studies, 38(4): 556-502.
Gammeltoft, P. 2008. Emerging multinationals: Outward FDI from the BRICS countries, International Journal of Technology and Globalisation, 4(1): 5-22.
Gubbi, S.R. Aulakh, P., Ray, S., Sarkar, M.B. & Chitoor, R. 2010. Do international acquisitions by emerging-economy firms create shareholder value? The case of Indian firms, Journal of International Business Studies 41, 397–418.
Jormanainen, I. & Koveshnikov, A. 2012. International activities if emerging market firms: A critical assessment of research in top management journals, Management International Review, advance online.
Lin, W.-T., & Cheng, K.-Y. 2012. The effect of upper echelons’ compensation on firm internationalization. Asia Pacific Journal of Management. doi:10.1007/s10490-011-9261-9.
Luo Y.D., Xue Q. & Han B. 2010. How emerging market governments promote outward FDI: Experience from China. Journal of World Business 45(1): 68-79.
Mathews, J. A. 2006. Dragon multinationals: New players in 21st century globalization. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 23: 5-27.
Meyer, K.E. & Thaijongrak, O. 2013. The dynamics of emerging economy MNEs: How the internationalization process model can guide future research, Asia Pacific Journal of Management, in press.
Morck R., Yeung B. & Zhao M. 2008. Perspectives on China's outward foreign direct investment. Journal of International Business Studies 39(3): 337-350.
Ramamurti, R. 2012. What is really different about emerging market multinationals? Global Strategy Journal 2(1): 41-47.
Tan, D. & Meyer, K.E. 2010. Business groups’ outward FDI: A managerial resources perspective, Journal of International Management, 16(2): 154-164.
Yang, H., Sun, S. L., Lin, Z., & Peng, M. W. 2011. Behind M&As in China and the United States: Networks, learning, and institutions. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 28(2): 239-255.

Multinational companies from emerging economies (EMNCs) are becoming major players in the globalized world economy and wield growing influence on economic dynamics in developed, emerging and developing countries alike. The foreign presence and operations of EMNCs are becoming increasingly intertwined with innovation and knowledge generation processes both at home and abroad.

While the extant literature tends to build on the assumption that firms internationalize on the basis of innovations carried out at home, EMNCs often engage in international activities with the intent to access technologies they lack or to acquire resources enabling them to strengthen their innovative capabilities.

There are a range of challenges associated with such activities. Identifying, assessing, accessing and absorbing technology and knowledge from abroad is rife with challenges. Compounding these challenges, EMNCs are often engaging asymmetrically with foreign partners much stronger than themselves in a particular technological domain. Vice-versa, relinquishing technology to EMNCs may pose dilemmas to incumbents as well as nations.

At a more aggregate level, innovation-related outward foreign direct investment is contingent upon and in turn influences the broader institutional innovation system in which the investing firm is embedded. For example, competitive dynamics at home may drive firms to seek technology abroad; successful absorption of foreign technology may require an enabling knowledge infrastructure at home; and technologies acquired abroad may in turn spill over into the wider domestic innovation system.

In host economies, innovation-related investments by EMNCs may bring about synergies and infuse local firms with required capital and market access, while at the same time intensifying competition in technological domains. Where high-tech clusters in developed economies are concerned, the nature and impact of EMNC presence remains insufficiently analyzed.

This special issue solicits papers related to the broad theme of the relationship between emerging economy multinationals and innovation and knowledge flows, whether perceived at micro, meso or macro level. Conceptual, representative and case-based papers alike are welcomed.

Subject Coverage

Topics include but are not limited to:

• Which roles of outward foreign direct investment (OFDI) are coming to play in the innovation processes of EMNCs, at both strategic and operational levels?
• Why, how and with which outcomes are EMNCs engaging in innovation-related OFDI?
• What are the implications for incumbent MNCs in developed countries, e.g. in terms of competitive and collaborative dynamics?
• How do host governments respond to technology-seeking investments by EMNCs? To which extent do they promote them, and what may be appropriate facilitating frameworks?
• What are the macroeconomic and institutional contingencies and implications for home economies of innovation-related investments?
• What are the opportunities and threats for host economies of these investments?

Notes for Prospective Authors

Submitted papers should not have been previously published nor be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. (N.B. Conference papers may only be submitted if the paper was not originally copyrighted and if it has been completely re-written).

All papers are refereed through a peer review process. A guide for authors, sample copies and other relevant information for submitting papers are available on the Author Guidelines page.

Editors and Notes

All papers must be submitted online. To submit a paper, please read our information on preparing and submitting articles. If you experience any problems submitting your paper online, please contact submissions@inderscience.com, describing the exact problem you experience. Please include in your submission the title of the Special Issue, the title of the Journal and the names of the Guest Editors.

Editors

James Agarwal, Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary, Canada

Terry Wu, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Canada

We invite academics and practitioners who are interested in the area of global marketing to submit book chapters for possible publication in the proposed book entitled "Emerging Issues in Global Marketing: A Shifting Paradigm".  This book is expected to be published in early 2018 by Springer

Brief Description

The increasing global competition for goods and services has led many business firms to develop international marketing strategies as part of their corporate mandate and corporate strategy. While previously the focus of international marketing was largely focused on the cultural and institutional differences, there has been an exponential growth in innovation and technological advances (e.g., social media and big data) especially in emerging markets that is impacting the approach to global marketing as business firms reach out to potential customers globally. Simultaneously, signs of new market potential with authoritarian regimes are promising as embargoes are lifted (e.g., normalized US-Cuba relations).  However, at the same time, emerging political risks and security concerns are changing the global game plan as countries weaken their commitment to regional trade blocs (e.g., UK and Brexit) and economies falter under populist leadership (e.g., Venezuela). The traditional approach to global marketing is no longer sufficient to address the emerging issues in global markets for the 21st century. Global companies need to take a new look at the contemporary threats and opportunities in markets, institutions, and technology and how they affect entry and expansion strategies through careful marketing-mix combinations.

Against this background, this book aims to address the paucity of research that currently exists in this area. In particular, this book will cover both the emerging theories and applications of global marketing for the 21st century. It aims to be of relevance to both academic researchers and practitioners globally such as CEOs and chief marketing officers as well as government officials and policy makers interested in formulating strategies/policies for global marketing activities in the face of a globalized economy.

With this perspective in mind, we invite you to submit a chapter that will offer new insights into emerging and cutting-edge issues in global marketing and highlight how global marketing strategies are changing in a globalized and digital economy that is fast changing.  The objective of this book is to present emerging issues and shifting paradigms in global marketing. Both conceptual and empirical (quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods) papers are welcome. Potential topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following topics: 

  • Globalization, Regionalization, De-Regionalization: Emerging Theoretical Frameworks in the Context of Emerging Economies (e.g., BRICS, Brexit)
  • Marketing Issues, Impact, and Implications of WTO on Globalization
  • Political Risk for Global Marketers in Populist, Xenophobic, and Authoritarian Regimes
  • Emerging Frameworks of Political Risk, Corruption, and CSR Strategies in Global Markets
  • Emerging Theories of Cultural and Institutional Distance:  Concepts, Dynamics, Crossvergence, and Measurement Issues
  • Global Marketing Research: Sampling Equivalence, Measurement Equivalence, Levels of Analysis, Hierarchical Modeling, Big Data and Customer Analytics and Techniques
  • Emerging Theories on Global Entry Strategies: Exporting, Contractual Agreements, and FDI
  • Lead Markets and Clusters of ‘R&D’ Innovation in Global Markets
  • Global, Regional, Local Branding Strategies in an Age of Growing Counterfeit Markets
  • Firm, Market, and Government Policy Factors in Global Pricing
  • Traditional versus Social Media Advertising: New Trends and Budget Allocation
  • Changing Nature of Global Retail Landscape
  • E-Commerce and M-Commerce (social media): New Global Marketing Challenges and Strategies
  • International Entrepreneurial Firm Growth and Expansion Strategies: Firm Specific and Country Specific Advantages
  • Global Marketing in Services (Deregulation, WTO, Sector Specific Issues)

Timeline

  • Submit a book chapter proposal: November 15, 2016
  • Notice of accepted chapter proposal: December 15, 2016
  • Submission of full book chapter: June 15, 2017
  • Final chapter submission after revisions: August 15, 2017 

Submission Process

Chapter proposals must be submitted by November 15, 2016 to be considered.  We will make initial editorial decisions on chapter proposals by December 15, 2016.  Authors of accepted proposals will be invited to submit their full book chapters by June 15, 2017.  All submissions will be double-blind peer-reviewed.  Contributors may be asked to serve as reviewers.  

  • You are invited to submit a 2-3 page chapter proposal 
  • Manuscripts must be original, and should not have been previously published or currently under consideration by other books or journals.
  • Please submit your chapter proposals via email to both editors: James Agarwal, james.agarwal@haskayne.ucalgary.ca; Terry Wu, terry.wu@uoit.ca.
  • All submissions must follow the format and reference styles from the Journal of International Business Studies.   

Any questions pertaining to the book chapters, please contact the co-editors:

Dr. James Agarwal: james.agarwal@haskayne.ucalgary.ca

Dr. Terry Wu: terry.wu@uoit.ca

References:    

Agarwal, James and Terry Wu (2015), “Factors Influencing Growth Potential of E-Commerce in Emerging Economies: An Institution-Based N-OLI Framework,” Thunderbird International Business Review, 57(3), 197-215.

Agarwal, James and Dorothee Feils (2007), “Political Risk and the Internationalization of Firms: An Empirical Study of Canadian-based Export and FDI Firms,” Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences, Vol. 24, No. 3, 165-181.

Agarwal, James and Terry Wu (2004), “China's Entry to WTO: Global Marketing Issues, Impact, and Implications,” International Marketing Review, 21(3), 279-300.

Agarwal, James, Naresh K. Malhotra and Ruth N. Bolton (2010), “A Cross-National and Cross-Cultural Approach to Global Market Segmentation: An Application Using Consumers’ Perceived Service Quality,” Journal of International Marketing, 18(3), 18-40.

Antia, Kersi D., Mark Bergen and Shantanu Dutta (2004), “Competing with Gray Markets,” MIT Sloan Management Review, Vol. 46, No. 1, 63-69.

Coviello, Nicole (2015), “Re-Thinking Research on Born Globals”, Journal of International Business Studies, 46, 17-26.

Malhotra, N. K., Agarwal, James & Ulgado, Francis. M. (2003). Internationalization and Entry Modes: A Multitheoretical Framework and Research Propositions. Journal of International Marketing, 11(4), 1-31.

Meyer, Klaus E. and Mike W. Peng (2016), “Theoretical Foundations of Emerging Economy Business Research,” Journal of International Business Studies, 47, 3-22.

Steenkamp, Jan-Benedict (2014), “How Global Brands Create Firm Value: The 4V Model” International Marketing Review, Vol. 31. No. 1, 5-29.  

Van Hoorn Andre and Robert Maseland (2016), “How Institutions Matter for International Business: Institutional Distance Effects vs. Institutional Profile Effects,” Journal of International Business Studies, 47, 374-381.

Over the last decade the significance of emerging economies in Africa, Asia-Pacific and Latin-/ South America in global logistics and supply chain management (LSCM) has been increasing. Using these regions as a context, research attention is beginning to be devoted to a market commonly known as the “Base of the Pyramid” or BOP. The BOP includes the majority of the world’s population, predominately residing in the least developed countries, who make up the bottom of the world’s economic pyramid. Involving the BOP as a pool of potential customers requires vigorous private and public partnerships that are willing to assume shared responsibility and implement sustainability practices beyond narrowly defined economic/productivity-based goals. It is therefore time for LSCM researchers to consider emerging issues related to BOP markets.

The objective of this STF is to raise awareness of the BOP market, and to encourage ground-breaking research in this domain. While current research is scarce in this area, we believe in the great potential of this domain. Desired topics include, but are not limited to the following:

  1. Impact of trade agreements on LSCM strategic practices involving BOP markets.
  2. Conceptual frameworks that examine complexity related to sustainable LSCM involving BOP customers.
  3. Empirical examinations of the role of LSCM in achieving competitive advantage for BOP markets.
  4. Theories and models that integrate LSCM principles (e.g. quality management, outsourcing, innovation, supplier development) within the BOP context.
  5. Interdisciplinary analyses of techno-culture interactions in LSCM for BOP entities.
  6. Critical roles of global LSCM for building sustainable environments for BOP entities.
  7. Case studies and theoretical frameworks in LSCM related to building products and services involving BOP markets.

All topically appropriate papers will go through JBL’s double-blind review process. Submission will be accepted between March 1 and March 31, 2016. You can learn more by e-mailing one of the guest editors at hult@broad.msu.edu, Paul.Hong@Utoledo.Edu, or Schoenherr@broad.msu.edu. Please submit your paper via Manuscript Central. Note that it is a special topic forum submission.

“Name some Brazilian multinationals. Even harder than "famous Belgians", isn't it? Despite Brazil being the world's eighth-largest economy, with plenty of big, profitable firms, few of them have a reasonable share of their operations abroad and are thus genuinely multinational.” The Economist, Sept 21, 2000.

 “For the first time Brazil has a crop of companies that can be described as multinationals. Some of them are already well known outside Brazil: Petrobras; Vale, one of the world’s largest mining companies; and Embraer, the world’s third-largest maker of passenger jets.” The Economist, November 12, 2009.

These two quotes from the British newspaper The Economist reflect the change in view about Multilatinas, or Latin American multinational companies. The reason is not that there were no Multilatinas before 2000. In fact, there have been Multilatinas for over a century. For example, the Argentinean shoemaker Alpargatas was created in 1885 and established subsidiaries in Uruguay in 1890 and in Brazil in 1907. The reason is that there were few studies analyzing Multilatinas before the 2000s. This was part of a general trend in the international business literature that appeared to have ignored the region. For example, a review of articles in two leading journals in the field of international business (Journal of International Business Studies and Management International Review) in the period 1987-1997 indicated that fewer than 6% of the articles mentioned Latin America (Elahee and Vaidya, 2001). This paucity of studies on the region had not changed in recent times. A review of studies in four leading international business journal (Journal of International Business Studies, Management International Review, Journal of World Business, and International Business Review) in 2001-2005 indicated that only 2.75% of articles studied firms in the region (Perez-Batres, Pisani and Doh, 2010). Nevertheless, a few analyses of multinationals have indicated that firms from this region are becoming multinational rapidly and some of them are becoming leaders in their industries (Casanova, 2009; Cuervo-Cazurra, 2008,; Fleury and Fleury, 2010; Santiso, 2013).

In this special issue we plan to take stock of what is known about these firms and identify potential avenues for future research. Other special issues of the Journal of World Business have analyzed various regions of the world such as India (Varma and Budhwar, 2012), China (Laforet, Paliwoda and Chen, 2012), Africa (Kamoche, 2011), the Middle East (Mellahi, Demirbag and Riddle, 2011), and Korea (Paik and Lee, 2008). This special issue contributes to the global scope of the Journal of World Business by studying firms from Latin America, which have, thus far, been underrepresented in the management and business literature (Brenes, Montoya and Ciravegna, 2014).  With this special issue, we aim to not only increase our understanding of Multilatinas, but also to identify the particular characteristics of their internationalization and how it compares with the internationalization of firms from other regions.

The rise of emerging market multinationals has been well documented (for example see the papers in the special issues edited by Aulakh, 2007; Cuervo-Cazurra, 2012; Gammeltoft, Barnard and Madhok, 2010; Luo and Tung, 2007; and in the books edited by Cuervo-Cazurra and Ramamurti, 2014; Ramamurti and Singh, 2007, Sauvant, 2008; Williamson et al., 2013), yet the literature on emerging market multinationals has thus far focused mainly on firms from regions other than Latin America. With this Special Issue of Journal of World Business, we aim to fill this gap, contributing to the international business literature and the body of knowledge documenting the practices of multinational companies.

This call is an attempt to integrate different aspects that might have influenced the growth and internationalization of Latin American firms. We welcome theoretical, empirical, methodological and case studies submission addressing, but not limited to, the following issues:

  • Successful Multilatinas expanding outside their region
  • Comparative ownership advantages/disadvantages of Multilatinas
  • Internationalization patterns of Latin American firms
  • The internationalization of state-owned Latin American firms
  • Institutional constraints for Latin American companies to internationalize
  • Foreign performance of Latin American firms
  • Effects of exports promotion agencies on the internationalization of Latin American firms
  • Governance in Multilatinas
  • The internationalization of Latin American business groups  
  • Global leadership in Multilatinas
  • Dimensions of management diversity in Multilatinas
  • Determinants of outward FDI from Latin America
  • The role of governments in Latin American International Business
  • Corporate social responsibility and sustainable practices in Multilatinas
  • The role of family-owned business conglomerates in Multilatinas
  • Oligopolistic structures and internationalization in Multilatinas
  • Multilatinas and economic and political crises
  • Cultural challenges in doing business from Latin America
  • The role of Latin American diaspora and returning emigrants in international business

Submission process:

By May 4, 2015, authors should submit their manuscripts online via the new Journal of World Business EES submission system. The link for submitting manuscript is: http://ees.elsevier.com/jwb

To ensure that all manuscripts are correctly identified for consideration for this Special Issue, it is important that authors select ‘SI: Latin American MNCs’ when they reach the “Article Type” step in the submission process

Manuscripts should be prepared in accordance with the Journal of World Business Guide for Authors available at http://www.elsevier.com/journals/journal-of-world-business/1090-9516/guide-for-authors. All submitted manuscripts will be subject to the Journal of World Business’s blind review process.

We may organize a workshop designed to facilitate the development of papers. Authors of manuscripts that have progressed through the revision process will be invited to it. Presentation at the workshop is neither a requirement for nor a promise of final acceptance of the paper in the Special Issue.

Questions about the Special Issue may be directed to the guest editors:

References:

Aulakh, P. S. (2007). Emerging multinationals from developing economies: motivations, paths, and performance. Journal of International Management, 13, 338-355.

Brenes, E. R., Montoya, D., & Ciravegna, L. (2014). Differentiation strategies in emerging markets: The case of Latin American agribusinesses. Journal of Business Research, 67, 847-855.

Casanova, L. (2009). Global Latinas: Latin America's emerging multinationals. Palgrave Macmillan.

Cuervo-Cazurra, A. (2008). The multinationalization of developing country MNEs: The case of Multilatinas. Journal of International Management, 14, 138-154.

Cuervo-Cazurra, A. (2012). How the analysis of developing country multinational companies helps advance theory: Solving the Goldilocks debate. Global Strategy Journal, 2, 153-167.

Cuervo-Cazurra, A., & Ramamurti, R. (2014). Understanding multinationals from emerging markets. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Economist. (2001). Brazil's Gerdau: Who dares wins. The Economist. www.economist.com/node/374586

Economist. (2009). Special Reports Economist Brazil. The Economist. www.economist.com/node/14829517

Elahee, M. N., & Vaidya, S. P. (2001). Coverage of Latin American business and management issues in cross-cultural research: An analysis of JIBS and MIR 1987-1997. International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, 4, 21-31. 

Fleury, A. & Fleury, M. T. L. (2011). Brazilian multinationals: Competences for internationalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Gammeltoft, P., Barnard, H., & Madhok, A. (2010). Emerging multinationals, emerging theory: macro- and micro-level perspectives. Journal of International Management, 16, 95-101.

Kamoche, K. (2011). Contemporary developments in the management of human resources in Africa. Journal of World Business, 46, 1-4.

Laforet, S. Paliwoda, S. and Chen, J. (2012). Introduction. Journal of World Business, 47, 1-3.

Luo, Y., & Tung, R. L. (2007). International expansion of emerging market enterprises: A springboard perspective. Journal of International Business Studies, 38, 481-498.

Mellahi, K., Demirbag, M., & Riddle, L. (2011). Multinationals in the Middle East: Challenges and opportunities. Journal of World Business, 46, 406-410.

Paik, Y., & Lee, S. H. (2008). Introduction. Journal of World Business, 43, 1-4.

Pérez-Batres, L.A., Pisani, M.J., & Doh, J.P. (2010). Latin America’s Contribution to IB Scholarship. Academy of International Business Insights, 10, 3-7. 

Ramamurti, R., & Singh, J. V. (eds). (2009). Emerging multinationals from emerging markets. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Santiso, J. (2013). The decade of the Multilatinas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Sauvant, K. P. (ed). (2008). The rise of transnational corporations from emerging markets: Threat or opportunity? Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar.

Varma, A., & Budhwar, P. (2012). International Human Resource Management in the Indian context. Journal of World Business, 47, 157-338.

Williamson, P., Ramamurti, R., Fleury, A., & Fleury, M. T. (eds). (2013). Competitive advantages of emerging country multinationals. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Objective

Emerging markets firms venturing into advanced economies has received increasing attention from both academics and practitioners (Atsmon, Kloss, & Smit, 2012; Luo & Tung, 2007). Although existing research has examined various aspects of this important phenomenon, such as the role of government (Luo, Xue, & Han, 2010), ownership and entry mode choice (Cui & Jiang, 2012), and absorptive capacity and overseas acquisitions (Deng, 2010; Liu & Woywode, 2013), there is the need to unpack contextual factors and to explore how context can influence the business leader’s decision making and managerial practices amid the venturing abroad phenomenon by emerging market enterprises.

Context matters a great deal for international business research and practices, such as the multiple embeddeness of multinational enterprises and local contexts (Meyer, Mudambi, & Narula, 2011). Cultural difference has an important bearing for emerging market firms venturing abroad. For instance, favours are a medium of exchange for social capital and prevalent in business in emerging markets (Teagarden & Schotter, 2013). However, such business practices might not be available in advanced economies which might become obstacles for emerging markets firms, or induce misunderstanding and confusion for Western managers. Despite under the same umbrella concept of emerging economies (Hoskisson, Wright, Filatotchev, & Peng, 2013), yet, emerging markets can vary on most significant dimensions—institutionally, economically, culturally, socially, technologically (Teagarden, 2013). Hence, there is the need to delineate and specify the contextual factors and boundary conditions with respect to emerging markets firms venturing into advanced economies. Furthermore, marketing practices in emerging markets may challenge the assumptions of received body of knowledge (Sheth, 2011).

The international marketing strategy of emerging market firms might pursue different strategy against the conventional wisdom (Vrontis, 2003; Vrontis, Thrassou, & Lamprianou, 2009). Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A) is a complex and sophisticated international management topic which involves multi-faceted challenges for managers in both emerging and developed markets (Weber, Tarba, & Oberg, 2014). M&A was identified as one primary market entry mode for emerging markets firms venturing abroad (Deng, 2012; Gomes, Angwin, Weber, & Tarba, 2013). One recent study shows that Chinese firms adopted an innovative post- acquisition integration approach largely due to the influence of contextual factors (Liu & Woywode, 2013). In addition, the ambidexterity perspective might largely advance our understanding of multinational enterprises from emerging economies (Chebbi, Yahiaoui, Thrassou, & Vrontis, 2014; Luo & Rui, 2009).

We embrace a pluralist view on emerging markets (Von Glinow & Teagarden, 2009) and encourage scholars to gain a nuanced contextualized understanding of emerging markets firms venturing into advanced economies through a comparative international management perspective (Luo, Sun, & Wang, 2011). Therefore, we seek for thought-provoking research on contexts and emerging markets firms venturing into advanced economies, and welcome both empirical (qualitative as well as quantitative) and conceptual contributions. Especially, we hope to highlight the practical implications derived from rigorous scholarship, to inform practice and provide insights for business practitioners and/ or policy makers. It is of significant importance to nurture future business leaders with a global mindset (Javidan, Teagarden, & Bowen, 2010), and we suggest a better understanding of emerging market firms venturing into advanced economies can help business leaders as well.

This SI aims to attract a variety of papers that can move the exciting research agenda further. Topics appropriate include, not limited to, the following:

  • Institutions (formal and/ or informal) impact on emerging markets firms venturing abroad
  • Commonalities and differences among emerging markets firms venturing abroad, BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) countries and beyond
  • Standardization vs. adaptation of international marketing of emerging markets firms
  • Learning and (reverse) knowledge transfer of emerging markets firms venturing abroad
  • International marketing practices and market entry strategy
  • Ambidexterity, HRM and leadership practices
  • Strategic management from a comparative international perspective
  • Community involvement and non-market strategy

We encourage cross-fertilization approach by blending different theoretical lenses (Oswick, Fleming, & Hanlon, 2011), and we particularly welcome scholars from strategy and international business to join our stimulating discussions. Submitted papers should not have been previously published nor be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. All papers are refereed through a double-blind peer review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submitting papers are available on the Author Guidelines page. http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117946257/grouphome/ForAuthors.html

Important Dates

  • Submission deadline: November 1, 2014
  • Publication release: 2016

Articles must be submitted through Thunderbird International Business Review’s Manuscript Central electronic submission system: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tibr

Please ensure your article abides by the scope and formatting conditions of this journal, which are detailed at http://www.thunderbird.edu/knowledge_network/tibr/submission.htm When submitting your article, please specify in your cover letter that you are submitting to the special issue on “Emerging Markets Firms Venturing into Advanced Economies”.

For additional information, please contact the special issue editors: Demetris Vrontis, School of Business, University of Nicosia, vrontis.d@unic.ac.cy, Yipeng Liu, Kent Business School, University of Kent, Y.P.Liu@kent.ac.uk

References

Atsmon, Y., Kloss, M., & Smit, S. 2012. Parsing the Growth Advantage of Emerging-Market Companies. Mckinsey Quarterly, 3: 10-14. Chebbi, H., Yahiaoui, D., Thrassou, A., & Vrontis, D. 2014. Building Multi-Unit Ambidextrous Organizations - A Transformative Framework. Human Resource Management: Forthcoming. Cui, L., & Jiang, F. 2012. State ownership effect on firms' FDI ownership decisions under institutional pressure: a study of Chinese outward-investing firms. Journal of International Business Studies, 43(3): 264-284. Deng, P. 2010. What determines performance of cross‐border M&As by Chinese companies? An absorptive capacity perspective. Thunderbird International Business Review, 52(6): 509-524. Deng, P. 2012. The Internationalization of Chinese Firms: A Critical Review and Future Research*. International Journal of Management Reviews, 14: 408-427. Gomes, E., Angwin, D. N., Weber, Y., & Tarba, S. Y. 2013. Critical Success Factors through the Mergers and Acquisitions Process: Revealing Pre‐and Post‐M&A Connections for Improved Performance. Thunderbird International Business Review, 55(1): 13-35. Hoskisson, R. E., Wright, M., Filatotchev, I., & Peng, M. W. 2013. Emerging Multinationals from Mid‐Range Economies: The Influence of Institutions and Factor Markets. Journal of Management Studies, 50(7): 1295-1321. Javidan, M., Teagarden, M., & Bowen, D. 2010. Making it overseas. Harvard Business Review, 88(4): 109-113. Liu, Y., & Woywode, M. 2013. Light-touch Integration of Chinese Cross-Border M&A: The Influences of Culture and Absorptive Capacity. Thunderbird International Business Review, 55(4): 469-483. Luo, Y., & Rui, H. 2009. An ambidexterity perspective toward multinational enterprises from emerging economies. Academy of Management Perspectives, 23(4): 49-70. Luo, Y., Sun, J., & Wang, S. L. 2011. Comparative strategic management: An emergent field in international management. Journal of International Management, 17(3): 190-200. Luo, Y., & Tung, R. L. 2007. International expansion of emerging market enterprises: A springboard perspective. Journal of International Business Studies, 38(4): 481-498. Luo, Y., Xue, Q., & Han, B. 2010. How emerging market governments promote outward FDI: Experience from China. Journal of World Business, 45(1): 68-79. Meyer, K. E., Mudambi, R., & Narula, R. 2011. Multinational enterprises and local contexts: the opportunities and challenges of multiple embeddedness. Journal of Management Studies, 48(2): 235-252. Oswick, C., Fleming, P., & Hanlon, G. 2011. From borrowing to blending: Rethinking the processes of organizational theory building. Academy of management review, 36(2): 318-337. Sheth, J. N. 2011. Impact of emerging markets on marketing: Rethinking existing perspectives and practices. Journal of Marketing, 75(4): 166-182. Teagarden, M. B. 2013. Not All Emerging Markets Are Created Equal. Thunderbird International Business Review, 55(3): 235-236. Teagarden, M. B., & Schotter, A. 2013. Favor prevalence in emerging markets: A multi-level analysis. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 30(2): 447-460 Von Glinow, M. A., & Teagarden, M. B. 2009. The future of Chinese management research: rigour and relevance redux. Management and Organization Review, 5(1): 75-89. Vrontis, D. 2003. Integrating adaptation and standardisation in international marketing: the AdaptStand modelling process. Journal of Marketing Management, 19(3-4): 283-305. Vrontis, D., Thrassou, A., & Lamprianou, I. 2009. International marketing adaptation versus standardisation of multinational companies. International Marketing Review, 26(4/5): 477-500. Weber, Y., Tarba, S. Y., & Oberg, C. 2014. A Comprehensive Guide to Mergers and Acquisitions: Managing The Critical Success Factors Across Every Stage of The M&A Process. USA & UK: Pearson & Financial Times.

The rise of multinational corporations (MNCs) from emerging markets has been a major development during the last decade. Publications such as the UNCTAD Global Investment Report and the FT Global 500 indicate the increasing share of these companies among the world’s largest multinationals. This development not only relates to the BRICs, but also comprises companies from countries such as Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Saudi-Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, Taiwan, Turkey and others. Explaining the rather sudden rise of these companies has become somewhat of a growth industry over the last years. (Brennan 2011, Sauvant et al. 2010). Various International Business scholars have developed or modified long established analytical instruments in order to account for the rise of these companies. Theories such as the Eclectic Paradigm (Dunning 1986) or the Product Cycle Model (Wells 1983) have been extended in order to account for the rise of these companies while others such as the Linking, Leverage, Learning-approach (Mathews 2002) have been proposed to address this novel phenomenon.

However, many of these approaches do not fully take into account that the institutional and political background in the home states of these companies may be quite different from the ones within most countries of the established centre of the world economy and that this background may be a very important one for understanding the transnational activity of these corporations (Goldstein 2007, Ramamurti 2008). Moreover, literature has only begun to address the implications of this institutional background for the global economic order (Nölke and Taylor 2010, Nölke 2011).

This call for papers is based on the assumption that a major feature of emerging market MNCs appears to be their close relationship with their home country states. To be sure, many Western MNCs cultivate close relationships with their home states as well (as, for instance, recently witnessed in the financial sector), but this special issue will investigate whether and where there is a special quality of relationship between the state and major corporations stemming from countries outside of the recent centre of the world economy, as well as explore how this special quality affects the cross-border activities of these corporations.

In order to study this claim, a number of topics may be highlighted that might form the focus of individual contributions, both comprising of specific public policies and more general structural issues. A first set of topics looks at the role of (partial) state ownership/(former) public enterprises among emerging markets MNCs, direct financial support by (para-) state bodies, such as development banks or pension funds, as well as the importance of close, formal or informal inter-personal networks between major corporations and public officials in these countries, as far as this proximity and these support measures directly effect the cross-border operations of emerging market MNCs.

The close relationship between emerging markets multinationals and their home states may, however, not be limited to a domestic issue. Corporations and governments may also cooperate quite closely with regard to trans-/international relations. A number of issues could be explored in this context:

•       Close relations between corporations and governments for gaining access to natural resources in other countries.
•       Cooperation between emerging market MNCs and home state governments with regard to negotiations about global/regional economic regulation, e.g. with regard to the selective protection of intellectual property rights or to competition policies that are geared towards the support of emerging “national champions”.
•       The non-enforcement of international regulations by home state governments, e.g. accounting and auditing standards or corporate governance regulations that prevent unfriendly take-overs, particularly by rival multinationals.
•       The different role of these MNCs with regard to private transnational governance, e.g. with regard to social and environmental standards.
•       The degree of integration of emerging market MNC managers in transnational organizations of the global capitalist class – vis-à-vis their primary identification with domestic state-based class networks.
Generally, the close relationship between these corporations and their home states may be considered as a problematic affair, not only from the perspective of liberals that despise any intervention of the state in economic affairs. We welcome papers that give special attention to the potential effects of this relationship with regard to:
•       The concentration of economic and political power due to the collusion of public officials and MNC owners/managers and its effect for the cross-border operation of firms.
•       Public policies that are biased towards the transnational expansion of big companies, thereby disadvantaging broad social groups (e.g. high consumer prices due to weak competition policies).
•       The emergence of international tensions, due to the use of governments in order to further company strategies (or the use of corporations for political strategies).
In order to study the agenda outlined above, we seek contributions by political scientists, political economists and critical business scholars, but also from scholars with a background in sociology, geography or business history. Moreover, we are seeking contributions from all regions of the world, in particular from emerging market economies.

Time schedule

The submission of manuscripts will follow a two step-approach. The first round is based on an initial call for abstracts (300 – 5000 words) with a deadline of 15 March 2012. A selected number of authors will subsequently be invited for an authors’ workshop on 18/19 June 2012 in Parma/Italy, sponsored by the COST Action IS 0905 “The Emergence of Southern Multinationals and their Impact on Europe”. Participation will be open to both members of the COST Action and other scholars. Papers for this workshop will be due 31 May 2012.

The submission deadline for manuscripts with CPoIB will be 1 December 2012, with initial reviewing to be completed by 28 February 2013, revisions due by 1st May 2013, final decisions by 1 August 2013, and anticipated publication in early 2014. Submission of manuscripts will be open to all scholars, not limited to participants of the authors’ conference in June 2012.

Submissions should follow the author guidelines for Critical Perspectives on International Business which can be found at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cpoib.htm.

Please direct questions, proposals and papers to the special issue Guest Editor at: a.noelke@soz.uni-frankfurt.de.

About the Guest Editor

Dr. Andreas Nölke is Professor of Political Science, with a special focus on International Relations and International Political Economy at Goethe University, Frankfurt. His research interests include comparative capitalism, emerging markets, financialization, deep integration, private governance and transnational policy networks. He has published articles in leading journals such as World Politics, Review of International Political Economy, Journal of Common Market Studies and Business and Politics.

References

Brennan, L. ed. (2011), The Emergence of Southern Multinationals: Their Impact on Europe, London/New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Dunning, J. H. (1986) “The Investment Development and Third World Multinationals,” in K. M. Khan (ed.) Multinationals of the South: New Actors in the International Economy, London/New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Goldstein, A. (2007), Multinational Companies from Emerging Economies, London/New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Mathews, J. A. (2002) “Competitive Advantages of the Latecomer Firm: A Resource-Based
Account of Industrial Catch-Up Strategies,” Asia Pacific Journal of Management 19: 467-488.
Nölke, A (2011) “Non-triad Multinational Enterprises and Global Economic Institutions, in: D. H. Claes and C. H. Knutsen (ed.), Governing the Global Economy. Politics, Institutions, and Economic Development, London/New York: Routledge.
Nölke, A and H. Taylor (2010), Non-triad Multinationals and Global Governance: Still a North-South Conflict?, in: M. Ougaard/A. Leander (eds.), Business and Global Governance, London/New York: Routledge.
Ramamurti, R. (2008) “What Have We Learned about Emerging-Market MNEs?,” Paper
Prepared for Conference on Emerging Market Multinationals: Outward FDI from Emerging and Developing Economies, 9-10 October 2008, Copenhagen: Copenhagen Business School.
Sauvant, K. and G. McAllister with M. Maschek eds. (2010), Foreign Direct Investments from Emerging Markets, London/New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Wells, L. T. (1983) Third World Multinationals: The Rise of Foreign Investment from Developing Countries, Cambridge, Mass: The MIT Press.

The study of a multinational company (MNC) has been a fundamental component of the international business literature. While there have been significant variations in the strategies and structures of MNCs from different advanced regions, they have tended to share technological, marketing, and managerial strengths, enabling them to overcome the so-called liability of foreignness in a variety of markets. They have invested for the most part in wholly or majority-owned subsidiaries, transferred technology, products, and knowledge from headquarters to their operations around the world, and relied on elaborate bureaucratic mechanisms and financial controls (Guillen and Garcia-Canal, 2009).
Recent years have seen the emergence of a growing number of MNCs from emerging economies as diverse as Brazil, China, Korea, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Russia, Singapore, Taiwan, and Turkey (Goldstein et al, 2006). Whereas these firms have essentially had humble beginnings, some of them have become global leaders in the meantime (Li and Kozhikode, 2008; Guillen and Garcia-Canal, 2009). The new MNCs operate internationally using entry modes such as alliances, joint ventures and wholly owned subsidiaries. Some of them are small and product focused and others are large and diversified (Guillen and Garcia-Canal, 2009). The literature has referred to them as “thirdworld multinationals” (Wells, 1983), “latecomer firms” (Mathews, 2002), “unconventional multinationals” (Li, 2003), “challengers” (BCG, 2008), and “emerging multinationals” (Accenture, 2008; Goldstein, 2007).

In spite of the interest in the topic of emerging multinationals as such, the academic literature is still based on the observation of firms from the so-called Triad (i.e. US, EU and Japan). Only recently a growing strand of literature has begun to question the phenomenon (Li, 2003). The Journal of International Business Studies (2007), the Journal of International Management (2007), the International Journal of Technology and Globalization (2008) and Industrial and Corporate Change (2009), for example, have dedicated special issues to the topic (Amighini et al, 2007). Although these issues have indeed published some very interesting pieces of work on emerging multinationals, those studies have largely focused on the nature of their competitive advantage, motivations, investment development paths and internationalization patterns (Amighini et al, 2007). This has also been the case for books published on the topic. For example, while Sauvant (2009) has comprehensively analyzed the rise and features of emerging multinationals, managerial aspects typical in these types of companies have not explicitly been dealt with. Also Ramamurti and Singh (2009) have asked why so many firms in emerging economies have internationalized so aggressively in the last decade, what competitive advantages these firms enjoy, and what the origins of those advantages are; however, their work has also largely neglected numerous management perspectives.
In academic studies, attempts to understand emerging multinationals have originated primarily from the “developed world” towards “developing countries”. Developing economies have been studied in their relation to investors and corporations expanding into them. Radhakrishnan (1994) has referred to this focus as the “I think therefore you are” syndrome. Genuine developments of emerging multinationals have been subsumed under the overarching explanatory power of Western theories. This attitude has inadvertently affected management and leadership studies. Western management has been regarded as a universal norm, and non-western management practices have been judged against this norm. The proponents of the so-called convergence hypothesis (e.g., Kerr et al, 1960) have argued that management systems would converge towards the models originating from the U.S. From this starting point, patterns in other countries have been viewed either as derivative of, or deviations from, the U.S. model (Locke et al, 1995). MNCs from developed countries have been given the status of ‘mainstream’, and emerging multinationals have been regarded as ‘unconventional’.

In recent years, it has been realized that many of the Western management practices and managerial styles cannot be transplanted exactly in the same manner to other culture and country contexts. Western management literature presents a model of organizational life that may or may not be appropriate in a non-Western business context. This is especially true for emerging multinationals. When Western management theories are applied directly, they may not match the local and cultural understanding of managerial problems and functions in non-Western MNCs. For example, unlike Western management theories, which emphasize delegation, empowerment, and power sharing as key component of effective leadership, research in many developing countries show that a more directive and autocratic management style is accepted and even legitimized (Badawy, 1980; Hofstede, 1984, Dia, 1994). Whereas especially the American view on management tends to overplay the influence of the top manager (Meindl, Ehrlich, and Dukerich, 1985; Meindl and Ehrlich, 1987), paternalism is valued and found in many developing nations (e.g., Dorfman and Howell, 1988). Similarly, counter to Western management paradigms which emphasize consistency and logic, research on management in many developing countries shows that behaving in accordance with the manager's beliefs, personalized and informal methods of conducting interpersonal business affairs and face saving are accepted as personal qualities of effective leaders (Abdullah, 1996).
In this book, we aspire to provide a new vantage point to management in emerging multinationals. Our aim is to create a state-of-the-art overview of management in emerging multinationals, from the point of view of these organizations themselves. We want to identify an analytic typology of cultural characteristics in order to interpret differing approaches to rationality, motivation, ethics and interpersonal relationships in a managerial context. We aim to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of various managerial approaches in different national contexts. Readers of the book will better understand the interplay among country and company cultures, corporate strategy, as well as individual differences in an emerging country´s MNCs. We will also be able to evaluate the generalizability of models from Western cultures in a more balanced manner. To summarize, in Marsden’s words (1991, p. 36), it is our aim to “… begin from where the people are, rather than from where development (and management) experts would like them to be…”.

The chapters included in this book can potentially make significant contributions to the theory and practice of management of MNCs by facilitating our understanding of universally applicable theories and concepts. The book will target students and researchers of international business and postgraduate students in such courses as international management, cross-cultural studies, and international business.

Topics covered include but are not limited to:

  • Cultural congruence and cultural differences in the interpretation of management in emerging country MNC’s
  • Traits, skills and styles of managers in emerging country MNC’s
  • General leadership styles of managers from emerging multinationals
  • Motivation techniques of managers from emerging multinationals
  • Communication and decision making styles
  • Control mechanisms (management of processes and outputs)
  • Value orientations and ethical dimensions of managers from emerging multinationals
  • Negotiation styles of and between managers in emerging multinationals
  • Multinational applications of generic strategies in emerging multinationals
  • Societal culture: Influences on organizational culture in emerging multinational contexts


We are looking to include both conceptual and empirical papers in this edited book. Relevant case study examples are also welcome.

Notes for Potential Authors
Submitted papers should not have been previously published nor be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. All papers are refereed through a peer-review process. Please be prepared to review and comment on some of the submitted articles for this book.

Important Dates
Deadline for submissions of extended abstracts: March 30, 2010
Deadline for submissions of completed papers: July 1, 2010
Double blind review of papers and feedback from review given to the author(s) by: September 30, 2010
Deadline for final submission of corrected papers: December 15, 2010
No changes can be made to the papers after: January 15, 2011

Editors and Notes
You may send one copy in the form of an MS Word file attached to an e-mail (details in Author Guidelines) to both the following:
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Dilek Zamantili Nayir (dznayir@marmara.edu.tr)
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Vlad Vaiman (vlad@ru.is)


References
Abdullah, A. (1996), Going Glocal: Cultural Dimensions in Malaysian Management, Malaysian Institute of Management, Kuala Lumpur.

Accenture. (2008). The rise of the emerging-market multinational. Retrieved December 3rd, 2009 from http://www.accenture.com/Global/Accenture_Blogs/Accenture_High_Performance_Business_Blog/January_2008/The+Rise+of+the+Emerging+Market+Multinational.htm

Amighini A., Sanfilippo M. and Rabellotti R. (2007), Emerging economic regional powers and local systems of production: new threats or new opportunities?, WP SERIES – N. 04/09 The rise of multinationals from emerging countries. A review of the literature

Badawy, M.K. (1980), Styles of mid-eastern managers, California Management Review 22 (2), 51-58.

BCG. (2008). The 2008 BCG 100 new global challengers: How top companies from rapidly developing economies are changing the world. Retrieved November 20th, 2009 from http://www.asiaing.com/how-100-top-companies-from-rapidly-developing-economies-are-changing-the-world-a-bcg-r.html.

Dia, M. (1994), Indigenous management practices: lessons for Africa's management in the '90s, in Serageldine, I. and Taboroff, J. (Ed.), Culture and Development in Africa, World Bank, Washington, DC. 165-191.

Dorfman, P.W. and Howell, J.P. (1988), Dimensions of national culture and effective leadership patterns: Hofstede revisited, Advances in International Comparative Management 3, 127-150.

Goldstein A., Bonaglia F. and Mathews J. (2006), Accelerated internationalization by emerging multinationals: The case of white goods,
Working paper, retrieved on October 12th, 2009 from http://dea2.univpm.it/quaderni/pdf/270.pdf.

Guillen M.F. and Garcia-Canal E. (2009), The American model of the multinational firm and the “new” multinationals from emerging economies, Academy of Management Perspectives 23 (2), 23-35.

Goldstein, A. (2007). Multinational companies from emerging economies. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Hofstede, G. (1984), Cultural dimensions in management and planning, Asia Pacific Journal of Management 1, 81-99.

Kerr, C., Dunlop, J. T., Harbison, F., and Myers, C. A. (1960). Industrialism and industrial man: The problems of labour and the management of economic growth. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Li, P. P. (2003). Toward a geocentric theory of multinational evolution: The implications from the Asian MNEs as latecomers. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 22(2), 217–242.

Li J. and Kozhikode R. K. (2008), Knowledge management and innovation strategy: The challenge for latecomers in emerging economies, Asia Pacific Journal of Management 25, 429–450.

Locke, R., Piore, M., and Kochan, T. (1995). Introduction. In R. Locke, T. Kochan, and M. Piore (Eds.), Employment relations in a changing world economy. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Mathews, J. A. (2002). Dragon multinationals: A new model of global growth. New York: Oxford University Press.

Meindl, J.R. and Ehrlich, S.B. (1987). The romance of leadership and the evaluation of organization performance. Academy of Management Journal, 30 (9), 91 - 109.

Meindl, J.R., Ehrlich, S.B. and Dukerich, J,M. (1985). The romance of leadership. Administrative Science Quarterly, 30, 78-102.

Marsden, D. (1991). Indigenous management. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 2(1), 21–38.

Radhakrishnan, R. (1994). Postmodernism and the rest of the world. Organization, 1: 305–340.

Ramamurti R. and Singh J. V. (2009), Emerging multinationals in emerging markets, Cambridge University Press; 1 edition.

Wells, L. T. (1983). Third world multinationals: The rise of foreign investment from developing countries. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

CALL FOR AUTHORS: Encyclopedia of Emerging Markets A Gale | Cengage Learning Reference We are inviting academic editorial contributors to the Encyclopedia of Emerging Markets to be published in 2013 by Gale | Cengage Learning. The Encyclopedia of Emerging Markets explores the world’s fastest-growing and newly flourishing emerging markets to include those countries in which a previously untapped potential for exports or investment is anticipated. Nations typically characterized under this banner are often developing countries, but they may also be economically formidable countries with markets that are increasingly open to exports. This single volume reference includes overviews of 33 countries currently identified as displaying the most rapid growth in social, business, and industrial activities. The market overview articles range from 2,000 to 3,000 words and are comprised of key macroeconomic data, geographic, political, and industrial factors, as well as comprehensive data on the nation’s GDP. 67 industry profiles articles ranging from 2,500-4,000 words also examine the markets which are at the forefront of the select countries’ bourgeoning economies. A list of contributors is included in the volume as well as an index and a thorough glossary. The following nations will be covered: Argentina Bangladesh Brazil Bulgaria Chile China Colombia Czech Republic Egypt Hungary India Indonesia Israel Malaysia Mexico Morocco Nigeria Pakistan Peru Philippines Poland Romania Russia South Africa South Korea Taiwan Thailand Tunisia Turkey United Arab Emirates (UAE) Ukraine Venezuela Vietnam We are now making article assignments with a deadline of November 15, 2012. If you are interested in contributing to the Encyclopedia of Emerging Markets, it can be a notable publication addition to your CV/resume and broaden your publishing credits. Moreover, you can help ensure that accurate information and important points of view are credibly presented to students and library patrons. Compensation is an honorarium payment of $.03 per word. The list of available articles and style guidelines are prepared and will be sent to you in response to your inquiry. Please then select which unassigned articles may best suit your interests and expertise. If you would like to contribute to building a truly outstanding reference with the Encyclopedia of Emerging Markets, please contact me by the e-mail information below. Please provide a brief summary of your background in global business topics, or provide your CV. Thanks for your time and interest. Thomas Walzer Author Manager markets@golsonmedia.com 

Chapter contributions are now invited from leading international scholars and experienced researchers in the field of women’s entrepreneurship for an exciting new book Entrepreneurial Ecosystems and Growth of Women’s Entrepreneurship: A Comparative Analysis, to be published by Edward Elgar Publishing Inc. in 2017.

The Diana International Project (1) is committed to advancing knowledge about the status of women’s entrepreneurship around the world. This book is the eighth volume in the series associated with the Project and will build on the success of the first volume - Brush, C., Carter, N.M., Gatewood, E.J., Greene, P.G. and Hart, M. (eds.) (2006) Growth-oriented Women Entrepreneurs and their Businesses: A Global Research Perspective. This new volume will further consider the various national and international, social and contextual influences on women’s entrepreneurship by examining ecosystems, and how these affect and influence growth strategies and business potential.

The objective of this book is to foster a provocative discussion about topics on women’s entrepreneurship and growth considering ecosystem frameworks. While it is anticipated that many of the contributors will already be part of the Diana International Project, we are aiming for an inclusive discussion on women’s entrepreneurship. Thus, chapters are particularly sought from researchers in geographic regions less represented in the Project, specifically Africa, Asia and South America.

Chapter submissions should be based on rigorous empirical or theoretical research, and should discuss and analyse one of the following:

  • key cultural, historical, social, political and economic (contextual) influencing factors on the ecosystems and how these influence growth and development of women’s entrepreneurship in a particular country (or group of countries)
  • strategies which were successfully adopted by nascent or established women entrepreneurs (or which could logically be adopted by them) to enhance the growth potential of their business within their ecosystems. 
  • comparisons of  country, regional or area ecosystems and their influence on growth strategies for women entrepreneurs
  • deep analysis of a single ecosystem considering its gendered aspects and how these influence growth strategies for women’s entrepreneurship

The overall aim of the book is to highlight key growth influences on women’s entrepreneurship, and to offer valuable insights into the mechanics of women’s entrepreneurship globally. 

June 2015

Diana Conference, Babson College

October 1, 2015

Expressions of interest/abstracts from participating authors.

October 30, 2015

Formal invitation/submission guidelines to selected authors.

January 1, 2016

Submission of draft chapters & initial review process.

March 1, 2016

Completion of feedback to authors.

May 1, 2016    

Submission of revised chapters from authors (including necessary permissions for diagrams, etc).

June 30, 2016

Ongoing editing of chapters by editorial team.

June/July 2016 

 

Completion of Prelims, Introduction & Conclusions.

 

Sept. 1, 2016

Submission of final manuscript to Edward Elgar.

If you are interested in submitting a chapter, please express your interest, in the first instance, by putting together a chapter abstract, as per the guidelines below, and forwarding it to GA_EElgarBook@bentley.edu, by October 1, 2015.

For an informal discussion on your submission, please contact any of the editors.

Submission Guidelines:

  1. A cover letter with all author affiliations and the paper title
  2. 3 page (double-spaced) abstract
    1. Include title- but NO AUTHOR information
    2. Research question/purpose of the chapter
    3. Theoretical foundation
    4. Data source(s) and methodology
    5. Implications/contributions
  3. Please submit your proposals to: GA_EElgarBook@bentley.edu

(1) The Diana Project was launched in 1999 by Professors Brush, Carter, Gatewood, Greene and Hart, to study the phenomenon of women’s entrepreneurship in the United States.  The Diana Project team, in partnership with ESBRI (Entrepreneurship and Small Business Research Institute, Sweden), inaugurated the Diana International Project (DIP) in 2003. DIP currently involves researchers from 16 countries worldwide and aims to provide a platform from which to develop, conduct and share a global research agenda dedicated to answering questions about women entrepreneurs and growth oriented businesses.

 

 

Africa is no longer the lost continent! Yet, the development of entrepreneurship is still in its early stages. If entrepreneurship is expected to contribute to Africa’s development, a great deal more needs to be done! This Special Issue of the JDE will focus on the nature and implications of entrepreneurship in Africa. Manuscripts may address any phase or aspect of the entrepreneurial process such as start-up, finance, growth, management, and influences of and effects on economic development. Studies may focus solely on one country or on comparisons between countries. All manuscripts must contribute to the editorial mission of the JDE.

The following are examples of topics of submitted manuscripts:

1. Women and Entrepreneurship
2. Roots of entrepreneurship in Africa
3. Special Opportunities and Challenges faced by entrepreneurs
4. Entrepreneurship and economic reforms
5. Cross-country comparisons and implications
6. The use of social networks (domestic and global).
7. Regional differences
8. Public Policy
9. Entrepreneurship education
10. Financing Issues

A double-blind review process will be employed to select manuscripts for publication. Each manuscript will be reviewed by two reviewers as well as being given topical considerations.
The length of the manuscript should not exceed 25 pages including all references, tables, and figures. Submitted manuscripts should follow the formatting and style guidelines provided in the Journal. Please submit your manuscript electronically by November 30, 2009 to jde@listserv.syr.edu:

Special Issue Co-Editors: Peter Koveos and Pierre Yourougou, Syracuse University; Ben Amoako-Adu, Wilfrid Laurier University

Guest Editors:

Paola Vola, University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy

Sylvia Rohlfer, CUNEF, Madrid, Spain

Lucrezia Songini, University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy

The competitive landscape of the twenty-first century is dynamic, highlighting the need for organizations to be entrepreneurial. Thus, a scientific dialogue on entrepreneurial orientation and spirit in family businesses and SMEs has emerged as a relevant topic. However, the capacity to conjugate entrepreneurial spirit of family businesses and smaller enterprises with the managerialization of the organizational structure and mechanisms as well as the professionalization of people involved in the company is critical for the long-term survival and development of those firms.

Research on managerialization of SMEs and family firms points out that they are characterized by a lower adoption of managerial mechanism, as a consequence of the strong linkages between the owners/managers and the enterprise; and/or the lack of managerial knowledge at the ownership, governance and management levels. It is commonly underlined that the management in these firms is characterized by some degree of informality and that individual and social control systems are more suited to these enterprises, due to common shared values and languages, informal relationships etc. (Marlow, Taylor and Thompson, 2010; Saundry, Jones and Wimberley, 2014; Rohlfer, Munoz and Slocum, 2016).

However, some authors stated that formal mechanisms could help family owned businesses to cope with the interests and problems of both the company and the family, and their specific agency costs (Rue and Ibrahim, 1996; Schulze et al., 2003; Songini, Gnan et Malmi, 2013; Della Torre and Solari, 2013). Literature on family firms recognizes the importance of managerialization and professionalization in smoothing succession’s process.

This special issue of Management Revue and the corresponding Track 03_09 – Entrepreneurship and Managerialization in SMEs and family firms, under SIG 03 – Entrepreneurship, at EURAM 2017, provides an opportunity to take stock of developments on these issues, particularly on the adoption of management mechanisms and the professionalization of SMEs and family firms and their balance with entrepreneurial spirit.

We are looking for contributions that explore the ability of successful SMEs and family business to maintain fresh entrepreneurial spirit while consolidating management and control mechanisms, and introducing professional managers, but also for contributions that analyze the consequences of losing momentum in that balance.

Thus, we invite papers that make an important theoretical and/or empirical contribution to our understanding of such issues; international and comparative papers are particularly welcome. Areas of interest include but are not limited to:

  • How and why SMEs and family firms restructure and reorganize the management of the firm in the light of managerialization and professionalization?
  • How can SMEs and family firms balance entrepreneurial spirit and managerialization/ professionalization? How do they maintain this balance along time and during generations?
  • What is the role of family members and non-family members in balancing entrepreneurial spirit and managerialization/ professionalization?
  • What is the role of women (family and non-family members) in such a balance?
  • What is the role of managerial mechanisms and professional managers in SMEs and family firms’ development and growth?
  • What are the implications of managerialization and professionalization on key employee relations characteristics, such as pay and conditions, employee voice and labor management relations?
  • How and why owner/managers ́ approaches to managerialization and professionalization vary in relation to issues such as firm, sector, national contexts and employee characteristics, among others?
  • What are the implications for owner-managers and other stakeholders, including employees?
  • Which theories can best help us explain and understand managerialization and professionalization in SMEs and family firms, and the relation with entrepreneurship?

This is not an exhaustive list.

Management Revue is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary European journal publishing both qualitative and quantitative work, as well as purely theoretical papers that advances the study of management, organization, and industrial relations. Management Revue publishes articles that contribute to theory from a number of disciplines, including business and public administration, organizational behavior, economics, sociology, and psychology. Reviews of books relevant to management and organization studies are a regular feature (http://www.management-revue.org/).

European Academy of Management

The European Academy of Management (EURAM) is a learned society founded in 2001. It aims at advancing the academic discipline of management in Europe. With members from 49 countries in Europe and beyond, EURAM has a high degree of diversity and provides its members with opportunities to enrich debates over a variety of research management themes and traditions (http://euramonline.org/programme2017/tracks/sig-03-entrepreneurship-ent.html).

Potential authors

Authors are encouraged to submit research manuscripts that are likely to make a significant contribution to the literature on entrepreneurship and managerialization and professionalization in SMEs and family firms for a double-blind review process. Contributors to the Track 03_09 “Entrepreneurship and Managerialization in SMEs and family firms” at EURAM 2017 Conference are encouraged to discuss their sub- mission prior or during the conference. Even if conference participants will benefit from a fast review process, submissions are not solely restricted to conference participants.

Deadlines

Full papers for this special issue of Management Revue must be with the editors by 31 July 2017. All submissions will be subject to a double-blind review process. Papers invited for a “revise and resubmit” are due on the 30 November 2017. Final decision will be made by May 2018. The special issue will be published in late 2018.

Submission and guidelines

Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system at http://www.management-revue.org/submission/ using SI “Managerialization” as article section.

The guest editors welcome informal enquiries by email:

Paola Vola

Sylvia Rohlfer

Lucrezia Songini

Literature

  • Aldrich, H. & Cliff, J. (2003). The pervasive effects of family on entrepreneurship: toward a family embeddedness perspective, Journal of Business Venturing, 18(5), 573-596.
  • Bettinelli, C., Fayolle, A. & Randerson, K. (2014). Family entrepreneurship: a developing field. Found. Trends Entrep., 10(3), 161–236.
  • Brannon, D. L., Wiklund, J. & Haynie, J. M. (2013). The varying effects of family relationships in entrepreneurial teams. Entrep. Theory Practice, 37(1), 107–132.
  • Chenall, R. (2003). Management control system design within its organizational context: findings from contingency-based research and directions for the future, Accounting Organizations and Society, 28 (2-3), 127-168.
  • Corbetta, G., Marchisio, G. & Salvato C. (2005). Fostering Entrepreneurship in Established Family Firms - Crossroads of Entrepreneurship, Springer.
  • Della Torre, E. & Solari, L. (2013). High-performance work systems and the change management process in medium-sized firms. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 24(13), 2583-2607.
  • Durán-Encalada, J. A., San Martín-Reyna, J. M. & Montiel-Campos, H. (2012). A Research Proposal to Examine Entrepreneurship in Family Business. Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Innovation, 8(3), 58-77.
  • Fayolle, A. (2016). Family entrepreneurship: what we need to know. In K. Randerson, C. Bettinelli, G. Dossena, & A. Fayolle (eds.), Family Entrepreneurship: Rethinking the Research Agenda (pp. 304–306). Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
  • Hoy, F. & Sharma, P. (2010). Entrepreneurial Family Firms. New York, NY: Prentice Hall.
  • Jennings, J. E. & McDougald, M. S. (2007). Work–family interface experiences and coping strategies: implications for entrepreneurship research and practice. Academy of Management Review, 32(3), 747-760.
  • Malmi, T., & Brown, D. A. (2008). Management control system as package - Opportunities, challenges and research directions. Management Accounting Research, 19(4), 287-300.
  • Marlow, S. Taylor, S & Thompson, A. (2010). Informality and formality in medium-sized companies: contestation and synchronization. British Journal of Management, 20(4): 954-966.
  • Randerson, K., Bettinelli, C., Fayolle, A. & Anderson, A. (2015). Family entrepreneurship as a field of research: exploring its contours and contents. Journal of Family Business Strategy, 6(3), 143–154.
  • Randerson, K., Dossena, G. & Fayolle, A. (2016). The futures of family business: family entrepreneurship. Futures, 75, 36–43.
  • Rohlfer, S., Muñoz Salvador, C. and Slocum, A. (2016). People management in micro and small organizations – a comparative analysis. FUNCAS: Estudios de la Fundación. Series Análisis, no. 79.
  • Sharma, P. (2016). Preface. In K. Randerson, C. Bettinelli, G. Dossena, & A. Fayolle (eds.), Family Entrepreneurship: Rethinking the Research Agenda (p. xiv). Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
  • Songini L. (2006). The professionalization of family firm: theory and practice. In Poutziouris P., Smyrnios K. & Klein S. (eds.), Handbook of Research in Family Business (pp. 269-297). UK: Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Songini, L. & Gnan, L. (2009). Glass ceiling and professionalization in family SMEs, Journal of Enterprising Culture, 17(4), 1-29.
  • Songini, L., Gnan, L., & Malmi, T. (2013). The role and impact of accounting in family business, Journal of Family Business Strategy, 4, 71-83.
  • Songini, L. & Gnan, L. (2014). The glass ceiling in SMEs and its impact on firm managerialization: A comparison between family and non-family SMEs, International Jounal of Business Governance and Ethics, 9(2): 287-312.
  • Songini, L. & Vola, P. (2014). The role of Managerialization and Professionalization in Family Busines Succession: Evidences from Italian Enterprises, in L. Gnan, H. Lundberg, L. Songini & M. Pelllegrini (eds.) Advancing European Entrepreneurship Research (169-196), IAP, Information Age Publishing Inc.
  • Songini, L. & Vola, P.(2015) The Role of Professionalization and Managerialization in Family Business Succession. Management Control, 2015/1, 9-43
  • Songini, L. & Gnan, L. (2015). Family Involvement and Agency Cost Control Mechanisms in Family Small and Medium-sized Enterprises, Journal of Small Business Management, 53(3), 748–779.

Objective

This special issue seeks to advance research on entrepreneurship in emerging markets. We invite scholarly and practitioner papers that advance extant knowledge and understanding of the factors that impact the establishment, internationalization, success and survival of small and medium enterprises in emerging markets. We welcome conceptual and empirical research including meta-analytical studies on the topic. Interesting topics may include, but are not limited to, the internationalization strategies of SMEs from emerging markets; the internationalization and de-internationalization processes of SMEs in emerging markets; relationships of SMEs with suppliers, customers, governments, labor unions and other institutional constituencies in emerging markets; the impact of culture on entrepreneurship in emerging markets; female entrepreneurship in emerging markets; the sustenance of born-global firms in and from emerging markets; economic, political, legal, technological and social impacts on entrepreneurship in emerging markets; and opportunities and challenges facing entrepreneurship in emerging markets.

Submission and Review Process

The deadline for submissions is December 1, 2011. Articles must be submitted through Thunderbird International Business Review’s Manuscript Central electronic submission system: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tibr  

Please ensure your article abides by the scope and formatting conditions of this journal, which are detailed at http://www.thunderbird.edu/knowledge_network/tibr/submission.htm When submitting your article, please specify in your cover letter that you are submitting to the special issue on “Entrepreneurship in Emerging Markets”.

Time Line

December 1, 2011: Deadline for electronic submissions of papers to TIBR special issue
March 2012: First round reviews for authors
September 2012: Deadline for papers with revisions
December 2012: Final decisions on papers for TIBR special issue

More Information

For additional information, please contact the special issue editors:

Ilan Alon, The China Center, Rollins College & Harvard Kennedy School, IALON@rollins.edu

Daniel Rottig, Lutgert College of Business, Florida Gulf Coast University, DRottig@fgcu.edu

Background
The informal sector refers to activities that are lawful in nature but not declared to the public authorities and thus are fully or partially outside of formal government regulation, taxation, and observation. In recent years, there has been growing recognition that many entrepreneurs operate wholly or partially in the informal sector. This tendency of entrepreneurs to operate in the informal sector is applicable not only in developing countries but also in transition economies as well as western developed nations.
Indeed, it is recognized that although this is a sizeable realm in global perspective, such entrepreneurship is more prevalent in some global regions and nations. It is also widely recognized that this is a heterogeneous sphere and that its character varies across populations. In some populations, it may be largely necessity-driven entrepreneurs operating in the informal sector; in others, it may be opportunity-driven entrepreneurs.
Special Issue on entrepreneurship in the informal sector: institutional perspectives
This special issue seeks to explore entrepreneurship in the informal sector from a range of institutional perspectives. Economic relations and institutions are shaped within - and thus are an integral part of - the surrounding political, social and cultural context. As such, informal sector entrepreneurship has to be understood within the broader political, social and cultural context of the places in which it is found.

The aim of the special issue is to bring together studies of informal sector entrepreneurship drawn from a wide variety of contexts. Empirical as well as conceptual studies are welcome. Topics of interest might include but are not restricted to the following:

  • The influence of formal and informal institutions on informal sector entrepreneurship
  • The role of weak institutions and corruption
  • Tax morale
  • Public perceptions of informality
  • Social entrepreneurship in the informal sector
  • Vulnerable groups and entrepreneurship/bottom of the pyramid studies
  • Necessity- versus opportunity-driven entrepreneurship
  • Public policy perspectives on informal sector entrepreneurs
  • Case studies of policy initiatives to tackle informal entrepreneurship
  • Social capital and informal entrepreneurship
  • Risk of detection and informality
  • Comparative studies of informal entrepreneurship

Other topics not mentioned above are welcome so long as they conform to the broad theme of the special issue.

Submission instructions

The deadline for the submission of papers is 15th January 2016.

Papers must be submitted electronically at: http://www.edmgr.com/rsbe/
Papers for the Special Issue should be prepared and formatted according to the Journal’s Instructions for authors available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission…

Enquiries regarding this special issue can be addressed to: Marijana Baric (marijana.baric@buckingham.ac.uk) or Colin C. Williams (C.C.Williams@sheffield.ac.uk).

Entrepreneurship has been, without doubt, a topic of rapidly growing interest to academics and policymakers for several decades. Since the beginning of the academic discourse on the topic, the conversation has expanded along multiple paths. A variety of facets have been explored including the relevance of entrepreneurship (e.g. Kuratko, 2011), policies and entrepreneurship (e.g. Hafer, 2013), economic benefits of entrepreneurship (e.g. Decker et. al., 2014), risk (e.g. Knight, 2005), the institutional environment for entrepreneurship (e.g. Gupta et. al., 2014), innovation ecosystems (e.g. Autio and Thomas, 2014), environmental conditions (e.g. Carsrud and Brännback, 2011) and environmental uncertainty (Gartner & Liao, 2012), opportunity discovery (e.g. Baker et. al., 2005), the opportunity nexus (e.g. Shane and Ventkatamaran, 2000), entrepreneurial finance (e.g. Fraser et. al., 2015), alternative financing (e.g. Bruton et. al., 2015) international entrepreneurship (e.g. Coviello, McDougall & Oviatt, 2011), corporate entrepreneurship (Corbett et. al., 2013), gender and entrepreneurship (e.g. Marlow & McAdam, 2013) and entrepreneurship education (e.g. Boyles, 2012). In addition, the notion of entrepreneurship has substantially evolved from the creation of new businesses into the realm of social (e.g. Choi & Majumdar, 2014) or political (e.g. Narbutaite Aflaki and Petridou, 2015) causes. While there have also been some studies with a country focus (e.g. Ahlstrom & Ding, 2014; Kraus & Werner, 2012), and selected ones with a focus on certain types of countries such as emerging economies (e.g. Kiss, Danis & Cavusgil, 2012) or post-conflict countries (e.g. Efendic et. al., 2014), there is still a relative paucity of research with a cross-national or cross-cultural focus. Apart from the large international comparative studies that is annually conducted by the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Consortium (e.g. Levie et. al., 2014), interest in country-specific or comparative studies has been limited. With this special issue, we intend to inspire and present research with such international and cross-cultural themes. For this issue, we invite submissions that provide cross-national comparisons or deep insight into the specific environments for entrepreneurship of individual countries. We seek both theoretical and empirical papers.

Subject Coverage: Suitable topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Macro-economic benefits of entrepreneurship
  • Institutional environments
  • Policies and regulation 
  • Drivers and restraining factors behind entrepreneurship 
  • Perception of risk and uncertainty
  • Opportunity discovery 
  • New venture creation
  • Innovation ecosystems 
  • Gender issues in entrepreneurship
  • International entrepreneurship 
  • Individual and organizational creativity and innovation 
  • Entrepreneurship in post-conflict environments
  • Social entrepreneurship 
  • Free-trade agreements and entrepreneurship 
  • New and alternative ways of start-up financing 
  • Science and university entrepreneurship
  • Entrepreneurship education
  • Government incentives and state-financed entrepreneurship

Notes for Prospective Authors: Submitted papers should not have been previously published nor be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. (N.B. Conference papers may only be submitted if the paper has been completely re-written and if appropriate written permissions have been obtained from any copyright holders of the original paper). All papers are refereed through a peer review process. All papers must be submitted online. To submit a paper, please read our Submitting articles page.

Important Dates

  • Submission of Manuscripts: 30 December, 2015
  • Notification to Authors: 1 March, 2016

Final Versions Due: 1 November, 2016

Purpose and research questions
Research on international competitiveness has been rigorously researched in the last three decades, as the phenomenon itself was spurred on by the extensive international involvement of multinational enterprises (MNEs). While strong firm- and subsidiary-specific advantages enhance MNEs’ international competitiveness, they should consider host country/region competitiveness, as well as home country competitiveness, for their success in internationalization (Rugman and D’Cruz, 1994; Rugman et al., 2012). Kolk (2010), in an earlier issue of this journal, illustrated how environmental sustainability issues can affect MNEs’ local, regional and global activities and when sustainability can be an opportunity for the development of firm specific advantages.

While managers, policy makers and the media have acknowledged that environment issues are one of the biggest concerns and challenges of businesses in the future, it is still unclear how environmentally responsible management (ERM) practices can become an additional dimension of firms’ international competitiveness (or firm-specific advantages). It is also unclear how the nation’s interest in regard to the environment enhances or weakens the competitiveness of the nation. For example, the pollution haven hypothesis notes that manufacturing and natural resource extraction firms relocate their operations from developed to less developed countries in order to take advantage of weak environmental regulations (Brunnermeier and Levison, 2004; Madsen, 2009; Jaffe and Palmer, 1997). The pollution haven hypothesis implies that environmentally responsible business practices do not provide international competitiveness as long as firms can find alternative places to locate their operations. On the other hand, an alternative win-win strategy (Porter, 1991; Porter and Van der Linde, 1995; Palmer et al., 1995) underlines the dynamic nature of competition, innovation and customer needs and suggests that properly designed environmental regulations can enhance a country’s competitiveness to promote business and attract good quality investment (Rivera and Oh, 2012). The win-win strategy views environmentally responsible business practices as eventually increasing international competitiveness. Thus, environmentally responsible MNEs do not need to exploit weak environmental regulations of a host country as these MNEs already have strong environmental capabilities (Rugman and Verbeke, 1998).

A recent study (Aguilera-Caracuel et al., 2012) found that corporate environmental practices in a host country depend upon country- and firm-level characteristics. The purpose of this special issue is to provide an avenue for modern competitiveness thinking that focuses on environmental responsibility among the many aspects of corporate social responsibility. We believe that significant opportunities exist for improving our understanding of how ERM affects MNEs’ international competitiveness and, thus, we would like to use these opportunities to advance theories of MNEs. This special issue provides an opportunity through which to bring together the research of scholars from a diverse range of disciplinary traditions, such as international business, strategy, economics, political science, and sociology. As a consequence, we expect that contributors will leverage their own perspectives and training in order to formulate and address novel research questions and hypotheses. We seek both theoretical and empirical papers that may address, but are not limited to, the following list of potential research questions:

How do MNEs transform home-grown ERM practices into international competitiveness?

What are the country- and firm-level boundary conditions of ERM induced international competitiveness?

Do MNEs’ ERM practices function as a catalyst, enhancing international competitiveness and organizational performance in foreign markets?

How do MNEs manage the various needs of ERM in host countries and align MNE- and subsidiary-level ERM practices?

Do environmentally responsible and green firms have advantages in foreign market entry and expansion? Is there any heterogeneity across the level of economic and social developments in a host country and across industries?

Does good corporate image derived from ERM practices play a pivotal role in acquiring local market information and eventually improving organizational competitiveness in international markets?

What motivates ERM practices in foreign markets? Is there any particular relationship between the level of foreign ownership and ERM practices abroad?

How do MNEs adapt themselves to host country ERM practices and regulations over time? What factors retard this adaptation? Does this adaptation increase the MNEs capabilities over their competitors?

Do foreign firms’ advanced environmental capabilities affect a host country’s ERM practices and regulations?

How do MNEs transform environmental capability to firm-specific advantages under the institutional void (i.e. in least developed countries)?

How should we measure environmental capability and performance of MNEs?

Submission Instructions:
The deadline for submissions is July 1, 2013. To learn more about the Multinational Business Review, including style guidelines, please visit the Multinational Business Review web site at:

www.emeraldinsight.com/mbr.htm

All submissions will be subject to the regular double-blind peer review process at the Multinational Business Review. The guest editors are seeking reviewers for this issue and are soliciting nominations and volunteers to participate as reviewers. Please contact the guest editors to volunteer or nominate a reviewer.

More information
To obtain additional information, please contact the guest editors:

Chang Hoon Oh, Simon Fraser University (coh@sfu.ca)
Byung Il Park, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies (leedspark@hufs.ac.kr)

References
Aguilera-Caracuel, J., Aragon-Correa, J.A., Hurtado-Torres, N.E. and Rugman, A.M. (2012), ‘‘The effects of institutional distance and headquarters’ financial performance on the generation of environmental standards in multinational companies’’, Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 105, pp. 461-74.

Brunnermeier, S.B. and Levison, A. (2004), ‘‘Examining the evidence on environmental regulations and industry location’’, Journal of Environment and Development, Vol. 13 No. 1, pp. 6-41.

Jaffe, A.B. and Palmer, K. (1997), ‘‘Environmental regulations and innovation: a panel data study’’,Review of Economics and Statistics, Vol. 79 No. 4, pp. 610-19.

Kolk, A. (2010), ‘‘Social and sustainability dimensions of regionalization and (semi)globalization’’,Multinational Business Review, Vol. 18 No. 1, pp. 51-72.

Madsen, P.M. (2009), ‘‘Does corporate investment drive a race to the bottom in environmental protection? A reexamination of the effect of environmental regulation on investment’’, Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 52 No. 6, pp. 1297-318.

Palmer, K., Oates, W.E. and Portney, P.R. (1995), ‘‘Tightening environmental standards: the benefit-cost of the no-cost paradigm?’’, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Vol. 9 No. 4, pp. 119-32.

Porter, M.E. (1991), ‘‘America’s green strategy’’, Scientific American, Vol. 264 No. 4, pp. 168.

Porter, M.E. and van der Linde, C. (1995), ‘‘Toward a new conception of the environment-competitiveness relationship’’, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Vol. 9 No. 4, pp. 97-118.

Rivera, J. and Oh, C.H. (2012), ‘‘Environmental regulations and multinational corporations’ foreign market entry investments’’, Policy Studies Journal, forthcoming.

Rugman, A.M. and D’Cruz, J.R. (1993), ‘‘The double diamond model of international competitiveness: the Canadian experience’’, Management International Review, Vol. 33 No. 2, pp. 17-39.

Rugman, A.M., Oh, C.H. and Lim, D.S.K. (2012), ‘‘The regional and global competitiveness of multinational firms’’, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Vol. 40 No. 2, pp. 218-35.

Rugman, A.M. and Verbeke, A. (1998), ‘‘Corporate strategy and international environmental policy’’,Journal of International Business Studies, Vol. 29 No. 4, pp. 819-33.

Abstracts due: July 1, 2017

Guest Editors:

Hilary E. Kahn

School of Global and International Studies

Indiana University

Bloomington, Indiana

hkahn@indiana.edu

 

Joshua E. Perry

Kelley School of Business

Indiana University

Bloomington, Indiana

joshperr@indiana.edu

 

Overview:

While the global business landscape may at times give the impression that it is flattening, connecting, homogenizing, and effacing difference, it is also quite complex, with dramatically contoured and contextual idiosyncrasies existing among cultures, business practices, political regimes, economic systems, traditions, religions, and histories. Customary practices in some markets may differ dramatically from what is acceptable or even legal in others, while at the same time manufacturing, importing and exporting, investments strategies, trade policy, markets, and modes of consumption are truly becoming worldwide. How does one navigate this world of similarity and difference, where business practices and protocol bring the world together as much as they accentuate difference?

How can executives, managers, marketers, consumers, and entrepreneurs operate confidently, successfully, and ethically in a culturally diverse global business environment? How do human values intersect with business practices? Can we speak about universal values in regard to a global business landscape, or must we consider human values in the context of specific business practices, social structures, and transactions? What exactly is a global business landscape? How does the global economy impact local decisions and practices, including how geopolitical entities and states define new practices and policies to build on what is both a universal and contextualized global business landscape? How should business leaders taking products and services to market understand and negotiate the inevitable tension between those relatively undeveloped markets without bright-line rules and those markets governed closely by government regulators and NGO watchdogs? Is mere compliance with existing codes of conduct or social norms sufficient or does ethical leadership in an industry require some greater or more aspirational commitment to “doing the right thing” – and how is the “right thing” in the business context defined or determined anyway? How does the complex international business world emerge in more localized and less obviously “global” settings? What new skills and learning must educators teach toward as we prepare students and citizens for the complicated global landscape that is as increasingly similar as it is rapidly different? 

These are just some of the vexing questions we hope to address in this special issue of Business Horizons. We are particularly interested in papers that explore these issues – and recommend best practices and applicable strategies – from a variety of disciplinary viewpoints, including anthropological, sociological, historical, educational, and legal scholarship. Moreover, we encourage conceptual, empirical, or theoretical submissions that explore these issues in a variety of industry and social contexts, including: health care, education/learning, technology, intellectual property, marketing, management, supply chain, finance, innovation and entrepreneurship, sustainability, human rights, government and public policy, etc., with the editorial aim being to strike a balance between practical application and scholarly analysis that prompts readers to think about the ethical and cultural dynamics of international business in new, innovative, and constructive ways.

If interested, please contact Josh Perry or Hilary Kahn to discuss your specific idea or plan to submit your 300-word abstract no later than July 1, 2017. Final submissions should conform to the Business Horizons Guide for Authors, available at: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/bushor

IMPORTANT DATES:

Abstracts due to BH by July 1, 2017

Review of abstracts complete and invitations to submit complete manuscript issued to authors on Aug 1, 2017

Completed manuscript due to BH by Dec 15, 2017

Manuscript returned to authors for revisions by Feb 15, 2018

Final manuscript submissions to BH due by April 1, 2018

This Special Issue of Business History will investigate the embeddedness and adaptation of East Asian business operations in Europe.

The influx of East Asian enterprises into Europe has a long history. Japanese business engagements in Europe stretch back for over more than 100 years and have, in this period, constantly evolved and adapted (Mason 1992; Buckley et al., 2013). Early Taiwanese investments date back to the 1950s (Tung, 1991; Ibeh et al., 2004) and Korean firms have explored European markets since the mid-1970s, when car manufacturer Daewoo opened its first trading office in Germany (Cherry, 2007). Foreign direct investment (FDI) by multinational firms often plays a key role in the economic development of host nations by enhancing human capital, conferring technology spillovers, and competitiveness (Barrell and Pain 1997) – and the evidence is that Japanese, Korean, and Taiwanese investments have benefited European host countries (Strange, 2002; Lee et al., 2012). Of itself, this provides the incentive for the governments of Europe to compete in influencing the decision process of multinational firms – to attract them to their constituencies, while hoping that these firms embed themselves locally.

The courting of Chinese firms by European Union member states has to be understood with this in mind. Although Chinese investments remain small to date, their growth over recent years and the rising assertiveness of Chinese companies strongly suggests a trend towards increased activity and greater visibility within Europe (Clegg and Voss, 2012). Analysing and comparing how Chinese investors, and investors from other East Asian nations, have approached and developed in Europe over time will yield important insights for scholarly understanding and for practitioners in European and other host countries.

Contributions are invited to investigate how and to what extent East Asian firms in Europe have evolved, while adapting to a different institutional context and embedding in the local economies. All contributions should shed light on specific characteristics of East Asian firms, and should consider critically if an East Asian ‘model’ of investment into Europe can be identified. If there were such a model, is there any evidence that late-comer investors from China, Korea and Taiwan have learned from the experience of Japanese firms with their long history of European activities? In other words, is there something akin to a demonstration effect from Japanese investors to other East Asian enterprises? And we know that, by and large, it is Japanese and Chinese firms that have invested in Western Europe, while Korean firms have preferred the Central and Eastern European member states. How has this difference in location affected local embeddedness and linkage building by investors? And what part is played by cooperation and competition between East Asian firms within the theatre of Europe? Suggested include subject coverage Investment and divestment strategies of East Asian businesses in Europe Local embeddedness and linkages of East Asian businesses in Europe Competitiveness of East Asian firms in Europe Adaptive processes and strategies Effect of the enlarging of the European Union on East Asian businesses.

Guidance notes

  1. Articles should be based on original research and/or innovative analysis.
  2. The main findings should not have been published or submitted elsewhere.
  3. The editors expect articles to be theoretically informed and to express novel interpretations of East Asian business history in Europe with implications for East Asian business history more generally.
  4. Authors wishing to use social science or managerial instruments of analysis should adapt them so that they allow for dynamic and not simply cross-sectional analysis. Articles should explain change across time and not simply examine static conditions.
  5. Authors are welcome to discuss ideas for papers with the guest editors Business History specific author and formatting guidelines can be found on the journal’s website: www.tandfonline.com/loi/fbsh

Submitting your manuscript

Submitted manuscripts should not have been previous published nor be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. All manuscripts are refereed through a double-blind peer review process. Please submit your manuscript online by 31 May 2015: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/fbsh When submitting online, please clearly indicate the Special Issue it is for.

Call for Chapters

Proposals Submission Deadline: January 15, 2019
Full Chapters Due: March 31, 2019
Submission Date: April 30, 2019

Introduction

The publication draws attention to the human side of the implications of the digital age. More importantly to the cultural aspects of work across national borders, cultural challenges faced by international virtual teams, management dilemmas relative to the resource issues when dealing with cultural diversity and Human Resource Management challenges confronted by technical environments and nationally qualified labour shortages.

Objective

Unlike Hofstede’s (2001) “collective programming of the mind” or Trompenaars and Turner’s (1998) problem resolution collective, Hoecklin (1995: 24) offers the following definition: ‘culture is not a ‘thing’ which can be experienced through the senses, just as ‘needs’, ‘social systems’, ‘evil’, and ‘peace’, are not directly tangible or visible. They are ideas constructed within the society. ‘Culture’ does not exist in a single easily defined form for specific goal for a specifiable number of people in a bounded area. And, obviously, a society does not consist of individuals with entirely uniform mental characteristics or personalities”. Unlike many of her contemporaries, Hoecklin does not provide a homogeneous form of culture, one that is easily assigned a grade or ranking, or cluster when compared with others. Given this more pertinent definition of culture, questions arise as to the relevancy of existing cultural models in a globalised world of rapid change and an international push towards digitalisation. Successive researchers have proposed several means to update the Hofstedean model and cultural dimensions. Recognising that the initial four components are now dated and due to Hofstede’s premise that culture is static, interested parties seek to upgrade the original rankings thereby, increasing the relevancy to a globalised twenty-first century. The major objective of this book is to promote new cultural models representative of the contemporary world environment subject to digital transformation.

Target Audience

The target audience of this book comprises professionals and researchers working in the fields of management and associated disciplines. Management practitioner: reference/guidebook to better formulate and design change management; evaluate possible impacts to ‘business as normal’; revise HR management policies and avoid ambiguous circumstances. Academics: use either as course texts or to supplement course -related materials; enhance curricula to incorporate new cultural models; identify areas of future research. Psychologists and sociologists: enhance current practice to incorporate new cultural models and to identify areas of future research. Consultants [consultancies]: enhance current practice to incorporate cultural appreciation.

Recommended Topics

Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following: 
I- New definitions of culture: 

  • proponents of culture and their impact of management; 
  • Post-Hofstedean models; 
  • culture and group behaviour in the digital era; 
  • determinants of shared culture, and 
  • the fallacy of national cultures. 

II- Digital era: 

  • I4.0 as a misnomer; 
  • cultural approaches to the digital era; 
  • national policies to achieve digitalisation; 
  • digital versus culture---social and economic impact, and 
  • Human Resource Management in the digital age. 

III- culture, diversity, and the digital era 

  • xenophobia and serotyping---hiring policies in labour challenged cultures; 
  • digital diversity; 
  • upgrading HRM policies; 
  • racial profiling; 
  • computer literacy versus sexual orientation or religion, and 
  • gender equality. 

IV-learning, education, and research 

  • redefining culture and work effort in the digital age; 
  • competence and expertise overrides stereotyping and xenophobia, and 
  • new methods of intercultural research.

Submission Procedure

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before January 15, 2019, a chapter proposal of 1,000 to 2,000 words clearly explaining the mission and concerns of their proposed chapter. Authors will be notified by January 30, 2019 as to the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by April 30, 2019 and all interested authors must consult the guidelines for manuscript submissions at http://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project. 
Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this book publication, Examining Cultural Perspectives in a Globalised World. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process. 
All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery® online submission manager.

Publisher

This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the "Information Science Reference" (formerly Idea Group Reference), "Medical Information Science Reference," "Business Science Reference," and "Engineering Science Reference" imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2019.

Important Dates

January 15, 2019: Proposal Submission Deadline 
January 30, 2019: Notification of Acceptance 
March 31, 2019: Full Chapter Submission 
April 30, 2019: Review Results Returned 
May 15, 2019: Final Acceptance Notification 
July 31, 2019: Final Chapter Submission

Inquiries

Dr. Richard Brunet-Thornton 
richard.brunet-thornton@vse.cz

Propose a chapter for this book

Expatriate research has played an important role in international business and international human resource management research during the last few decades (Welch & Björkman, in press). This is not surprising given the key role expatriates often play in foreign subsidiaries, their high cost, and the challenges they may face in foreign cultures. However, since the early research on expatriate success, the definition of an expatriate and what it means to be successful have expanded (Collings, Scullion, & Morley, 2007; Brewster et al., 2014). While prior research has greatly increased our understanding of the determinants of expatriate success, the literature is criticized for being largely expatriate-centric, particularly focused on corporate expatriates, and with a somewhat singular focus on increasing expatriate cross-cultural adjustment (Takeuchi, 2010; Welch & Björkman; in press). This is problematic because the background, motivation, and experiences of the different types of expatriates, e.g. corporate versus self-initiated expatriates, may vary substantially (Froese & Peltokorpi, 2013). Accordingly, organizations need to concern themselves beyond simply the adjustment of their expatriates, and look at whether the objectives of expatriation have been met – both long and short term, and the impact it has had, and may continue to have, on multiple stakeholders (Reiche, Lazarova, & Shaffer, 2014).

With this comes a greater imperative to broaden our research perspectives. These perspectives should account for a greater range of expatriate types and the increasing presence of women expatriates and expatriates from emerging economies (Brookfield Global Relocation Trends, 2014; Collings et al., 2007; Mayrhofer & Scullion, 2002). When defining expatriate success, our perspectives should also involve a longer time frame (including repatriation, career outcomes, and sustainability), and a wider range of stakeholders directly or indirectly implicated by the expatriation process (Oddou, Osland, Blakeney, 2009; O’Sullivan, 2013). Cross-cultural contact impacts and requires adaptation of all parties involved – not simply the expatriate (Berry, 1997; Caprar, 2012). A multiple stakeholder perspective is also crucial for developing sustainable IHRM expatriation practices. We should also be interested in processes – asking what roles various stakeholders play in the expatriation process, and what effect expatriation may have on these stakeholders. We suggest that stakeholders could include, but are not limited to: the multinational HQ and its subsidiaries, host country nationals (HCNs) within and outside of the workplace, other expatriates in the host unit or in other subsidiaries, spouse/partner, family members, and host communities and nations.

This special issue seeks papers that can change the conversations we will have about expatriation, expand our theoretical horizons, while identifying clear practical and actionable prescriptions for expatriates and the stakeholders. We encourage papers that think outside the proverbial expatriate adjustment box and papers that situate the expatriate in the appropriate context along with the stakeholders implicated by the process. Original quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research, meta-analytic reviews, and theory development are all potentially suitable for inclusion in the special issue. Below is a list of exemplary topics that are consistent with the scope of the special issue:

  • Networks of expatriates
  • Challenges surrounding the selection, preparation and support of women expatriates
  • Interaction between expatriates and HCNs of different hierarchical levels (supervisor, colleague, subordinate)
  • Impact of HCNs on expatriate success
  • Impact of expatriates on HCNs’ attitudes and behaviors
  • Sustainable relationships between expatriates and local stakeholders
  • Sustainable IHRM expatriation practices
  • Differences and impact of host organizations on different types of expatriates
  • Interaction between family and expatriate (e.g., work-life balance, conflict, or enrichment)
  • Challenges of emerging expatriate types (e.g., flexpatriates, commuters, virtual expatriates who are geographically separated from their families, expatriates from emerging economies)
  • Challenges organizations face in managing alternative forms of global employees 
  • Impact of spouse/family, co-worker, mentor, organizational support
  • The roles of HQs and subsidiaries in the expatriation process
  • Stakeholders in the repatriation process and career development of expatriates
  • Interaction between the repatriate and the work unit
  • Expatriate-specific HR practices in the host unit
  • Organizational culture in the subsidiary and/or local organization
  • Experiences of expatriates in various host country environments

Submission Process and Timeline

To be considered for the special issue, manuscripts must be submitted no later than 15th November 2015, 5:00pm Eastern Standard Time. Papers may be submitted prior to this deadline as well. We welcome quantitative, qualitative (including case studies) and conceptual papers that provide unique insights into expatriates in context. Findings and/or conceptualizations should have theoretical and policy implications, and seek to inform management practice. The editors of the Special Issue will be pleased to discuss initial ideas for papers via email.

Submitted papers must be based on original material not under consideration by any other journal or publishing outlet. The editors will select up to 5 papers to be included in the special issue, but other submissions may be considered for other issues of the journal. All papers will be subject to a double-blind peer review in accordance with the journal guidelines and will be evaluated by at least two reviewers and a special issue editor. The final acceptance is dependent on the review team’s judgments of the paper’s contribution on four key dimensions:

  1. Theoretical contribution: Does the article offer novel and innovative insights or meaningfully extend existing theory in the field of global mobility?
  2. Empirical contribution: Does the article offer novel findings and are the research design, data analysis, and results rigorous and appropriate in testing the hypotheses or research questions?
  3. Practical contribution: Does the article contribute to the improved management of global mobility?
  4. Contribution to the special issue topic.

Authors should prepare their manuscripts for blind review according to the Journal of Global Mobility author guidelines, available at www.emeraldinsight.com/jgm.htm. Please remove any information that may potentially reveal the identity of the authors to the reviewers.

Manuscripts should be submitted electronically at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jgmob. Authors should select the special issue title Expatriates in Context from the drop down menu.

For enquiries regarding the special issue please contact either of the two Guest Editors, Fabian Froese at ffroese@uni-goettingen.de or Soo Min Toh at soomin.toh@toronto.ca.

References

Berry, J. (1997). Immigration, acculturation, and adaptation. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 46, 1, 5–34.

Brewster, C., Bonache, J., Cerdin, J.-L., & Suutari, V. (2014). Exploring expatriate outcomes. International Journal of Human Resource Management. 25, 1921-1937.

Caprar, D.V. (2011). Foreign locals: A cautionary tale on the culture of MNC local employees. Journal of International Business Studies 42, 608-628. 

Collings, D.G., Scullion, H., & Morley, M.J. (2007). Changing patterns of global staffing in the multinational enterprise: Challenges to the conventional expatriate assignment and emerging alternatives. Journal of World Business, 42, 198 – 213.

Froese, F.J., & Peltokorpi, V. (2013). Organizational expatriates and self-initiated expatriates: Differences in cross-cultural adjustment and job satisfaction. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 24, 1953-1967.

Mayrhofer, W. & Scullion, H. (2002). Female expatriates in international business: empirical evidence from the German clothing industry. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 13, 815-836.

Oddou, G., Osland, J. S., & Blakeney, R. N. (2009). Repatriating knowledge: Variables influencing the "transfer" process. Journal of International Business Studies, 40, 181-199.

O’Sullivan, S. L. (2013). The empowering potential of social media for key stakeholders in the repatriation process. Journal of Global Mobility, 1, 264-286.

Reiche, S., Lazarova, M., & Shaffer, M. (2014). Me, myself and I: From individual-centered to multiple stakeholder perspectives in expatriate research. Panel presented at the Academy of International Business Annual Meeting.

Takeuchi, R. (2010). A critical review of expatriate adjustment research: Progress, emerging trends, and prospects. Journal of Management, 36, 1040-1064.

Welch, D., Björkman, I. (in press). The place of international human resource management in international business. Management International Review, DOI 10.1007/s11575-014-0226-3.

The management research on international mobility remains focused on immigrants in the ‘West’ such as in Europe and U.S.A (Al Ariss and Özbilgin, 2010; Inal, Özbilgin and Karataş-Özkan, 2009). Nevertheless, career of skilled immigrants in the Middle-East is under- researched in the management studies (Healy and Özbilgin, 2003). Accordingly, we know little on the career barriers and also on the opportunities as well as the strategies that immigrants in the Middle-East use to advance their careers. This theme is of great importance as of the large numbers of immigrants in this region. For example, organizations in oil exporting countries within the region are in need of employing expatriates from different parts of the world (Richardson and McKenna, 2003). However, in complete contrast to this openness towards attracting an international workforce, granting work and citizenship rights in some Middle-Eastern countries is a very complicated process.

We are interested in empirical and conceptual research that investigates the careers of skilled people undertaking an international mobility to or within the Middle-East region. This includes persons relocating to the Middle-East from European countries, Canada, U.S.A as well as from other countries. This also includes people moving from one Middle-Eastern country to another (such as the case of many Palestinians, Lebanese and Syrians) (Yapp, 1995). This international mobility could be undertaken on temporarily or permanent basis.

Countries in the Middle-East as well as immigrants in this region are not homogeneous (Tanova, Karatas-Özkan and Inal 2008). Accordingly, we are interested in studies that situate the career experiences of the immigrants within national and historical settings. This situational approach would offer a good representation of the diversity of careers available for immigrants in this region. Papers could examine the career of immigrants from micro-individual, meso-organizational, and macro contextual levels (Özbilgin, 2006; Syed, 2008). Contributors might decide to focus on one of these levels or to have a multilevel study. Papers using different methodological approaches and inter-disciplinary perspectives are welcome.

Call for papers questions may include (but are not limited to):

  • From a regional comparative perspective, what are the limitations and opportunities that the different state policy interventions in the Middle-East present for skilled immigrants’ career development?
  • At a national level, how do state policy interventions in the different Middle-Eastern countries influence the career experiences of skilled immigrants?
  • How does the intersection of gender and ethnicity affect skilled immigrants' career development in the context of employment in the Middle-East?
  • At the micro-individual level, what explains how skilled immigrants can have successful (or unsuccessful) careers in the Middle-East?
  • What do we know on immigrant entrepreneurs in the context of the Middle-East?
  • Within career and management studies, what theoretical frameworks/sensitizing concepts could be suitable to study careers of skilled immigrants in the Middle-East? What interdisciplinary approaches (e.g. sociological, political, socio-cultural, ideological and economical) could be suitable to examine their career experiences?


Manuscripts (with a word-count of 5000-7000) and correspondence should be submitted via e-mail by November 30th 2010 to either Guest Editors of this special issue (while copying the others) at the following email address:

Akram Al Ariss: akram.alariss@groupe-esc-troyes.com
Nur Koprulu: nkoprulu@ciu.edu.tr
Gozde Inal: ginal@ciu.edu.tr



References
Al Ariss, A. and M. Özbilgin (2010). ‘Understanding Self-Initiated Expatriates: Career Experiences of Lebanese Self-initiated Expatriates’, Thunderbird International Business Review, 54(4).

Inal, G., M., Özbilgin, M. Karatas-Özkan (2009). Understanding Turkish Cypriot Entrepreneurship in Britain. In T. Kucukcan and V. Gungor (eds), Turks in Europe: Culture, Identity, Integration, Amsterdam: Turkevi Research Centre, pp. 483-513.

Özbilgin, M. F. (2006). ‘Relational methods in organization studies: a review of the field’. In O. Kyriakidou and M. F. Özbilgin (eds), Relational Perspectives in Organizational Studies. A Research Companion, pp. 244-264. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Özbilgin, M. and G. Healy (2003). ‘"Don't mention the war" - Middle Eastern careers in context’, Career Development International, 8(7), pp. 325 - 327.

Richardson, J. and S. McKenna (2003). ‘International experience and academic careers: what do academics have to say?’, Personnel Review, 32(6), pp. 774-795.

Syed, J. (2008). ‘Employment prospects for skilled migrants: A relational perspective’, Human Resource Management Review, 18 (1), pp. 28-45.

Tanova, C., M. Karatas-Özkan and G. Inal (2008). ‘The process of choosing a management career. Evaluation of gender and contextual dynamics in a comparative study of six countries: Hungary, Israel, North Cyprus, Turkey, UK and the USA’, Career Development International, 13(4), pp. 291-305.

Yapp, M. (1995). The Near East Since the First World War. London: Longman.

Guest editors: Brendan Gray (University of Otago) and Rod McNaughton (University of Auckland)

Abstract due: 31 July 2014

Confirmation: 31 August 2014

Full papers submitted by: 15 January 2015

We are seeking conceptual and empirical papers that explore the theoretical interplay between entrepreneurship, sustainability and resilience. This offers an opportunity to examine the interface between these three constructs thus contributing to a significant scholarly debate and the development of theory that is importance to the broader field of business, economics, and allied fields of practice such as economic development. Possible topics include:

  • Tensions between sustainability and resilience
  • Mechanisms linking entrepreneurship to the resilience of individuals, organizations or communities
  • Institutional influences on entrepreneurship, sustainability and resilience
  • Studies of sustainability and resilience in real or virtual communities
  • Issues involved in using the constructs of sustainability and resilience at different levels, from the individual through to nations
  • Studies that focus on particular economic, social and/or ecological risks and human response viewed through the lens of sustainability and/or resilience
  • Approaches and issues to measuring sustainability and resilience
  • Other related issues.

“Resilience” is an increasingly important concept in our understanding of how organisations and local communities perform and respond to exogenous shocks. Research in a number of contexts suggests the actions of entrepreneurs result in more resilient organizations and economic systems that better withstand disruptions and recover quicker. However, there is limited knowledge of the specific mechanisms that drive this association, even though such knowledge would be valuable in helping organizations and regions to foster entrepreneurial activities that will better prepare them to deal with a variety of possible challenges.

Entrepreneurship researchers have made surprisingly few contributions to the discussion and understanding of “resilience”. Yet resilience and entrepreneurship have many attributes in common; for example, flexibility, adaptiveness, proactivity, and innovativeness. One of the key tensions in entrepreneurship theory – whether the actions of entrepreneurs move the economy toward equilibrium or away from it – has an analogy in resilience discourse; the question of whether resilience helps communities and/or organisations to preserve existing economic structures or adapt by forging new ones.

The dominance of the “sustainability” construct in the entrepreneurship literature may be one reason that researchers have yet to grapple with the possible overlap between entrepreneurship and resilience enhancing processes. Sustainability is associated with business models that minimize negative externalities, whereas resilience focuses more on adapting to change, especially sudden shocks in the external environment. Thus, while literature adopting a sustainability perspective tends to focus on how business effects the environment, a resilience perspective focuses more on how the environment affects business.

The Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy is published by Emerald. Articles should be a maximum of 10,000 words, including references and appendices. Information on the format of manuscripts is available at: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=jec#10 Prospective authors should begin by sending an abstract of approximately 500 words to one of the guest editors before 31 July 2014. Selected authors will be invited to develop a full paper and submit it for review by 15 January 2015.

Co-editors:

Professor Brendan Gray

University of Otago

brendan.gray@otago.ac.nz

 

Professor Rod McNaughton

University of Auckland

r.mcnaughton@auckland.ac.nz

 Publisher: Springer International

Publishing Editor: Dr. Sami BASLY, Associate Professor, University of Paris West Nanterre La Défense

Book description: Family firms are the most common type of firms throughout the world and particularly in the Arab and Muslim-Majority countries. Surprisingly, very little academic research has been conducted about these organizations in a region characterized by a strong importance given by individuals and communities to family, clans, values and tradition. From the Maghreb to the Middle East, small and more aged firms are commonly owned and managed by members of extended families who play a distinguishing role in the Arab world unlike nuclear families in Western or Nordic countries. As extant research is mainly due to Western researchers established in many cases in these countries, current knowledge about Arab family firms is heavily influenced by a Western culture lens. Well, even if theses analyses are legitimate, one could assume that researching family firms in the Arab world may require handling the specific context, culture and values of the countries where they evolve. Besides, family business scholars have paid attention to family firms in some regions of the world – apart from Western countries – such as Asia, Latin America. But, to our best knowledge, no attention has been paid to the Arab countries region despite the need and value of such an analysis.

The projected book intends to shed light on these organizations in order to highlight their uniqueness in the specific context of the Arab region. How these firms could grow, operate and compete in societies characterized by high collectivism, high uncertainty avoidance and high masculinity (Hofstede, 1991)? Even if it is difficult to generalize most cultural values across all Arab countries (Lamb, 1987), some authors emphasized the unique characteristics of the Arab culture and identified it as a fourth paradigm that represents the management practice in Arab countries besides the three most well-known paradigms (American, European, and Japanese cultural paradigms) (Obeidat et al., 2012). Particularly, Arab culture is adherent to religion and is characterized by “familism”, where the loyalty of individuals is to their families and then to the next social level that individuals belong to as their tribe, religious sect or to the extended family (Sidani and Thornberry, 2009). In addition, as pointed out by Al-Rasheed (2001), managers have a limited future orientation and excessive lack of delegation of authority. Moreover, a difficult emancipation from tradition is highly noticeable. In sum, some constant features may be underscored and may explain how family firms may be specific in Arab countries as all of these traits could be reflected in managerial styles, attitudes and practices.

Economic environment is not to be neglected as many of these countries roughly share the same difficulties pertaining to underdevelopment, high rates of unemployment and weak diversification of economies. In some other Arab countries, oil abundance is a determinant feature which constitutes both a hindrance to the exploration of new economic models but also a facilitator allowing for the conversion of certain countries’ economies. Arab family firms greatly contribute in shaping the economies of their countries but they are also constrained by their environment. However, they are the key for the development of the region’s countries and may help to provide solutions to the current crisis and political turmoil mainly originating from unemployment and lack of freedom. We solicit your scholarly articles to be incorporated in this edited book as a chapter. Prospective authors are encouraged to submit papers tackling the various aspects of management, governance and strategy of family firms in the Arab countries.

  • We expect scholarly articles to be incorporated in this edited book to highlight the following themes:
  • Does the cultural specificity of Arab family firms shape the governance and management of these firms?
  • What is the influence that specific values in the Arab world (Honor, pride, loyalty, trust) could exert on the management of family firms? How do spiritual and religious values influence business in family firms?
  • What’s the role of emotions in the management of family firms in the Arab World?
  • Is there any specificity of innovation by Arab family firms?
  • What influence do uncertainty avoidance and risk aversion have on financial decisions?
  • Do Arab family firms deal differently (from their Western counterparts) with social pressures and corporate social responsibility?
  • What impact, if any, political regimes and systems have on family firms in the Arab world?
  • How do Arab family firms compete internationally?
  • What is specific in the succession process for Arab Family firms?

Submission procedure: Conceptual and empirical papers (9000 – 10000 words) adopting a managerial, economic, sociological or historical perspective are welcome. Papers must be original and not published or in consideration elsewhere in other books, journals or websites. All papers will be submitted to a peer review process.

Interested authors are invited to send:

  • a working Chapter title;
  • a concise and a compelling abstract for the chapter;
  • a detailed resume (academic post, main academic qualifications and publications);

Submissions are to be sent by email to: sbasly@u-paris10.fr

Time frame:

  • Deadline for proposal submission: May 15, 2016
  • The final version is needed by June, 30, 2016

Contact: For inquiries about this call for chapters and manuscript submissions, please email to the editor: sbasly@u-paris10.fr

References:

Al-Rasheed A., 2001. Features of Traditional Arab Management and Organization in the Jordan Business Environment. Journal of Transnational Management Development, Vol. 6, Iss. 1-2, 2001.

Dadfar, H., 1984. Organization as a mirror for reflection of national culture: A study of organizational characteristics in Islamic nations. In Proceedings of the First International Conference on Organization Symbolism and Corporate Culture, 1984.

Hofstede, G., 1991. Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind. McGraw-Hill, London.

Lamb, D., 1987. The Arabs. Random House, New York.

Obeidat, B. Y., Shannak, R. O., Masa’deh, R., & Al-Jarrah, I. (2012). Toward better understanding for Arabian culture: Implications based on Hofstede’s cultural model. European Journal of Social Sciences, 28(4), 512-522.

Sidani, Y., Thornberry, J., 2009. The current Arab work ethic: Antecedents, implications, and potential remedies. Journal of Business Ethics 91 (1), 35–49.

Weir, D. T. H., 1993. Management in the Arab world, In Proceedings of The First Arab Management Conference. University of Bradford Management Centre, UK July 6-8, 604-623.

In this special issue, we invite researchers to submit original papers, case studies and review articles that provide new insights on family firms in Iberoamerican countries. Articles that compare the findings from these regions with the current literature are particularly encouraged. The topics to be covered by this call include, but are not limited to:

  • Firm succession, family legacy and sustainability of family businesses. 
  • Essays in business history of families firms. 
  • Firm performance and the family founder effect. 
  • Internationalization and businesses diversification in family controlled firms.
  • Family business groups and conglomerates.  
  • Corporate governance in family firms.
  • Family businesses finance, capital structure and agency conflicts. 
  • Entrepreneurship dynamics within family firms.
  • Productivity and innovation in family controlled firms.
  • Professionalization and delegation within family firms. 
  • The role of family businesses and business families in different economies and societies.

For questions regarding, Submission Process & Guidelines for this special Issue please contact the Guest Editors:

Alberto Gimeno, ESADE, Spain alberto.gimeno@esade.edu

Maria José Parada, ESADE, Spain mariajose.parada@esade.edu

Claudio Muller, Universidad de Chile, Chile cmuller@fen.uchile.cl

References

Claessens, S., & Yurtoglu, B. (2013). Corporate governance in emerging markets: A survey, Emerging Markets Review, 15: 1–33.

Fan, J., Wei, K., & Xu, X. (2011). Corporate finance and governance in emerging markets: A selective review and an agenda for future research, Journal of Corporate Finance, 17: 207–17.

Kearney, C., 2012. Emerging markets research: trends, issues and future directions. Emerging Markets Review 13: 159–183.

Yu A., Lumpkin G., Sorenson R., & Brigham, K. (2012) The Landscape of Family Business Outcomes: A Summary and Numerical Taxonomy of Dependent Variables, Family Business Review, 25: 33-57.

Asia Pacific Journal of Finance and Banking Research (APJFBR)

ISSN (Online edition) 1933-3455; ISSN (Print Edition) 1933-3390

 

The Editor of the Asia Pacific Journal of Finance and Banking Research (APJFBR) invites papers on the following topics but not limited to:

  • The Supply Chain Finance
  • New Technologies in Finance
  • New Techniques of Risk Analysis in the Emerging Markets
  • Entrepreneurship and Diversification in the Environment of Globalization
  • Theoretical and empirical papers or case studies relating to all areas of Banking, Finance.

We will publish a special issue on the theme New Trends in the Emerging Financial Market next year, in addition to our normal annual edition.

About the journal

APJFBR, ISSN [(Online edition) 1933-3455; ISSN (Print Edition) 1933-3390] is an annual, peer-reviewed research journal publishing since 2007. It is listed in Cabell’s, EBSCO and ProQuest Directories of USA. For more information about this journal, please go to http://www.globip.com/asiapacificjournal.htm

Submission Process

All submissions will undergo a rigorous double-blind evaluation process to ensure quality of publication. Send us your manuscripts at the following address: submissions@globip.com. Articles are accepted in MS-Word or PDF formats. For your article to be considered for the special edition, please submit by March 31, 2014. Submission and publication fees are waived.

Who may submit articles?

Contributions from both scholars and practitioners will be highly obliged.

Please direct all questions to:

Dr. Weiping Liu

Editor-in-Chief, E-mail: liuw@easternct.edu

Despite their shared historical roots, international economics (IE) and international business (IB) have developed as two distinct fields of study. While economists directed their efforts at formalizing the workings of international trade and investment at the macroeconomic level, business scholars attempted to open the black box of the (multinational) enterprise, relying more on conceptual narratives than mathematical tools.

With the advent of new trade theory (Helpman and Krugman, 1987), the firm was re-introduced as the object of interest in international economics. The recent advancement of the heterogeneous firm in formal models of (“new new”) international trade (Melitz, 2003) has further spawned an unprecedented amount of theoretical and empirical microeconomic research in international economics (Greenaway and Kneller, 2007). Hence, after fifty years of co-existence, the potential for spillovers between IE and IB has increased significantly.

The purpose of this special issue is to explore ways in which empirical research in IE and IB can inform and reinforce each other. In many cases, mutual unawareness of existing themes, models, methodologies and jargon, makes effective integration of both streams difficult. In an era of globalization with such a crucial role for multinationals, and the need for scholars to explain contemporary global developments, a more effective model of knowledge development is key. We believe that increased understanding in and of both IE and IB will advance our knowledge of firm-level trade and investment behavior beyond the levels that can be achieved if these streams keep developing in relative isolation.

This special issue seeks to integrate insights from IB and IE. A number of (non-exhaustive) illustrative examples of topics where IE and IB either share unexploited overlap and synergies, or could benefit from each other’s conceptual and methodological insights are the following:

- The sources of firm heterogeneity. Most international economists limit their theoretical and empirical conceptualization of firm heterogeneity to differences in (labour or total factor) productivity. IB scholars on the other hand have provided more diverse sources of firm heterogeneity, for example in theories of strategy and economic organization based on firm-specific resources (e.g. Hennart, 2009). (How) can these alternative sources of firm heterogeneity be incorporated in microeconometric models of international trade and investment, and what are their implications for trade and investment performance?

- Behavioural theories of internationalization. Already in the 1970s, IB scholars recognized that firms tend to follow specific paths of internationalization which tend to defy rational cost and benefit calculations. In particular, cumulative learning experience and psychic distance between home and host countries are important explanatory factors in this regard. More recently, economists have also started to document and model similar strategies of sequential exporting. What can the established IB literature (e.g. Johanson and Vahlne, 2009) in this field add to the new developments in IE?

- The impact of the liability of foreignness. Ever since the inception of their field, IB scholars have put the liability of foreignness at the center of theories on trade and Foreign Direct Investment (e.g. Hymer, 1976; Zaheer & Mozakovski, 1997). This liability bears resemblance to the notion of fixed export and investment costs in IE heterogeneous firms models, which empirically have been related to the extensive (rather than the intensive) margin of trade and investment (e.g. Helpman et al., 2008). Such a distinction is rarely made in IB studies. (How) can the different notions underlying the liability of foreignness be incorporated more systematically in studies on the extensive and intensive margins of trade?

- Firm heterogeneity and the impact of FDI. IB scholars have traditionally been more concerned with the determinants and organization of FDI, whereas IE scholars have worried more about the impact of FDI via spillovers or wages (Meyer, 2004). It seems natural to assume that FDI which is differently motivated or organized will also yield different impacts on the host-country environment. Can these two literatures be linked to lead to more nuanced and richer empirical predictions on the contingencies of the impact of FDI?

- Global value chain fragmentation. Both IE and IB scholars agree on the increased relevance of offshoring and outsourcing. Whereas IB scholars have used survey based evidence suggesting a move from manufacturing to increased offshoring of knowledge-based activities (blue collar to white collar offshoring), IE scholars refer to a similar phenomenon as increased trade in tasks (Grossman and Rossi-Hansberg, 2008). One crucial issue concerns the relation between the two observations; how does the trade in tasks discussion relate to the offshoring discussion in IB? What overall picture emerges when putting the two observations together?


Planning and submission procedure

The deadline for submission is August 31, 2012. Submissions can be sent to Roger Smeets (r.smeets@uva.nl).

References:
Greenaway, D. and Kneller, R. 2007. Firm heterogeneity, exporting, and Foreign Direct Investment. The Economic Journal 117(517): F134-F161.

Grossman, G.M. and Rossi-Hansberg, E. 2008. Trading tasks: A simple theory of offshoring. American Economic Review 98(5): 1978-1997.

Helpman, E. and Krugman, P.R. 1987. Market Structure and Foreign Trade. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.

Helpman, E., Melitz, M. and Rubinstein, Y. 2008. Estimating trade flows: Trading partners and trading volumes. Quarterly Journal of Economics 123(2): 441-487.

Hennart, J.F. 2009. Down with MNE centric theories! Market entry and expansion as the bundling of MNE and local assets, Journal of International Business Studies 40(9): 1432-1454.

Hymer, S.H. 1976. The international operations of national firms: A study of foreign direct investment. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.

Johanson, J. and Vahlne, J.E. 2009. The Uppsala internationalization process model revisited: From liability of foreignness to liability of outsidership, Journal of International Business Studies 40(9): 1411-1431.

Melitz, M. 2003. The impact of trade on intra-industry reallocations and aggregate industry productivity. Econometrica 71(6): 1695-1725.

Meyer, K.E. 2004. Perspectives on multinational enterprises in emerging economies. Journal of International Business Studies 35(4): 259-276.

Zaheer, S., and Mosakowski, E. 1997. The dynamics of the liability of foreignness: a global study of survival in financial services, Strategic Management Journal 18(6): 439-464.

The Institute of Central American Fiscal Studies (Icefi) is a think tank that specializes in issues related to fiscal policy. The research area of Icefi is centered in Central America, region in which the Institute has elaborated technical analysis in topics such as public policy, health, education, macroeconomics, political action, environmental issues and development focused on fiscal policy. The Institute believes that the efforts of research should be applied to the construction of societies more equitable and just in Latin America, specifically Central America. This belief is the main reason why the Institute began with the Revista Centroamericana de Estudios Fiscales (RCEF).

The purpose of the journal is to publish advanced knowledge focused on fiscal issues of Latin America, specifically Central America, in the topics related to economic, social, political and environmental circumstances and its impact in fiscal policy. The journal motivates the creation of avant-garde theories and innovative knowledge in fiscal policy by researchers that are interested in presenting original papers and book reviews.

Invitation to publish in the first edition of RCEF

The first issue of RCEF invites researchers to submit papers in the field of fiscal policy in Latin America focused in public policy, health, education, macroeconomics, political action, fiscal budgets, government income, tax effects and fiscal methodologies that could be applied to Central America. The journal accepts research that includes new theoretical frameworks and innovative methodologies in the fiscal policy theme in Latin America, specifically Central America.

The suitable topics would include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Public policy focused on fiscal issues
  • Environmental issues and its impact on fiscal policy
  • Education and public policy
  • The consequences of fiscal policy in health
  • Comparative analysis of government’s budgets
  • Analysis of fiscal incomes
  • The effect of taxes, direct or indirect, en the economic development of Central America or Latin America
  • Comparative methodologies in fiscal policy applied to Central America or Latin America.

The Inter-American Development Bank (IADB) is sponsoring the first edition of the RCEF

Submission and review of papers

All submitted papers must be original, unpublished and it should not be under consideration in a different journal. The papers will be revised by a peer-review journal that will guarantee an ethical and transparent process.

First reception of papers: June 1st 2015

Revision of papers: July 5th 2015

Submission of final papers: July 30th 2015

For more information please visit our website: http://www.rcef.icefi.org/ or contact Mauricio Garita at the following address: mauricio.garita@icefi.org

Several (if not most) countries have not fully recovered from the devastating consequences of the recent multifaceted global crisis, which emerged as a subprime mortgage – and an energy (oil shock of 2007-2008) – crisis that was triggered in 2007 and gradually developed into a financial, sovereign debt and eventually, an economic crisis without precedent in post-war economic history. Data until 2015 (2014 for foreign direct investment – FDI) reveal that economic recovery in the West is still very fragile. While the United States (where the crisis commenced) and most European countries (where the crisis impacted the most) have recovered in terms of GDP and inward FDI, only two countries from the European Union (EU) have recovered in terms of employment and similarly, only seven EU countries have surpassed the amount of fixed investment (gross fixed capital formation) that was reported before they were hit by the crisis. The United States have also not recovered in terms of employment and fixed investment.

The fragile economic recovery following the global financial and economic crisis, and the climaxing refugee and migrant crisis, are an example of the issues that endanger stability in the EU. However, it is persistently poor performance in economic indicators such as unemployment rates that give rise to Euroscepticism and jeopardize coherence and growth of the EU.

The experience of economic adjustment in the Eurozone (and the EU) with regard to the limited potential for public investment expenditure and the emphasis on improving competiveness, indicates the critical role of FDI. Within the particular framework, policy officials should improve the conditions favoring the factors that determine inward FDI and the reinvestment rate with the purpose of keeping as much of the rents as possible on FDI in the domestic economy and improve the absorptive capacity in order to improve competitiveness, innovation and productivity. The abovementioned describe the focus of this special issue on the factors attracting FDI and its impact on the host and home EU countries in the aftermath of the global financial and economic crisis. The aim is to attract papers that research the phenomenon and to present the experience of emerging vis-à-vis developed EU economies.

More specifically, the special issue is focused on – but not limited to –research in the following topics:

  • The changing geography of FDI in the EU after the crisis with emphasis on flows, concentration and impact.
  • The role of FDI in the relationships between the former communist bloc of the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe and Asia with the EU, after the crisis.
  • The contribution of FDI in the economic, political and social transformation of EU members and candidates of the former communist bloc of the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, after the crisis.
  • Political risk, national culture (e.g. formal/informal institutional environment) and foreign direct investment in the EU.
  • Revisiting FDI and home/host EU countries economic growth and/or economic development (e.g. social impact of FDI).
  • The impact of FDI on home/host EU countries competitiveness vis-à-vis international trade or outsourcing.
  • Determinants and motives of FDI in the EU.
  • Barriers and obstacles to FDI in the EU.

It is desirable that the above topics will be addressed from a comparative perspective, i.e. across time (before and after the crisis) and/or between economies and sectors of economic activity.

For further information please contact Bitzenis Aristidis (bitzenis@yahoo.com).

Bitzenis P. Aristidis is a Professor in Global Entrepreneurship and Foreign Direct Investment at the Department of European and International Studies of the University of Macedonia, Greece. He received his Ph.D. from Glasgow University, UK (on FDI). He has published extensively in international refereed journals and in books with various publishers such as Palgrave-Macmillan, Ashgate. Dr Bitzenis is an active researcher in various European funded programs such as Interreg, THALIS, DASTA, etc.

References and further reading

Bitzenis, A. and Vlachos, V.A. (2016). Foreign direct investment in the light of the recent crisis. Global Business and Economics Review, 18 (2): 115-123.

Bitzenis, A., Vlachos, V.A. and Papadimitriou, P. (2012). Mergers and Acquisitions as the Pillar of FDI. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Eurostat: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/data/database. Eurostat data on Gross Domestic Product at market prices and Gross Fixed Capital Formation (chain linked volumes, index 2005=100) and unemployment rates (unadjusted) extracted on 15.05.2016.

OECD: http://stats.oecd.org/. OECD data on United States Gross Domestic Product and Gross Fixed Capital Formation (constant prices, 2010 base year) extracted on 15.05.2016.

UNCTAD: http://unctadstat.unctad.org/wds/ReportFolders/reportFolders.aspx. UNCTAD data on Foreign Direct Investment at current prices (inward stock) extracted on 15.05.2016.

UNCTAD (2013). World Investment Report 2013: Global Value-Chains: Investment and Trade for Development. New York and Geneva: United Nations. Available online at http://unctad.org/en/PublicationsLibrary/wir2013_en.pdf.

UNCTAD Policy Brief No. 3, April 2012. Sovereign Debt Crisis: From Relief to Resolution. Available online at http://unctad.org/en/PublicationsLibrary/uxiiipb2012d3_en.pdf.

UNCTAD Policy Brief No. 5, June 2012. Breaking the cycle of exclusion and crisis. Available online at http://unctad.org/en/PublicationsLibrary/uxiiipb2012d5_en.pdf.

"Foreign entrepreneurs in China" Submission deadline extended to June 15th, 2018 Journal information at: https://eber.uek.krakow.pl/index.php/eber/index

Submit at: https://eber.uek.krakow.pl/index.php/eber/user/register

Description of the Thematic Issue

BACKGROUND: Since its “opening” nearly 40 years ago, China has been attracting foreign entrepreneurs. Now, being the world’s second-largest economy, a member of the World Trade Organization as well as other global and regional economic blocks and cooperation agreements, the country remains a magnet for businesspeople from all around the world. During the process of China’s impressive economic development foreign entrepreneurs played an important role contributing to the advancement of technology and management practices in China. Yet, while learning from abroad still plays an important role, the focus has been shifting towards development of Chinese own knowledge and enhancing Chinese innovation. Successive Five-Year Plans and state policies explicitly focus on the development of Chinese technologies, patents, know-how, and brands. AIMS The aim of this thematic issue of the Entrepreneurial Business and Economic Review (EBER) is to understand the changing role of foreign entrepreneurs in China with regard to the international diffusion of knowledge, management practices and innovation.

Specifically we ask:

  • what do foreign entrepreneurs learn in China?
  • What is their role in the international diffusion of Chinese technologies and innovation?
  • What kind of management practices do they learn and apply back in their home countries, or spread further across the world?
  • What is the current role of foreign entrepreneurs in the advancement of technology in China?
  • Do they bring valuable technologies and managerial practices which can be applied in China?
  • Can foreign entrepreneurs act as catalysts of Chinese innovation?

We are inviting empirical papers investigating subjects within the broad theme of this issue.

The EBER journal has a strong tradition of publishing high-quality quantitative research, however, we are open to other research methodologies as well. The list of topics below is indicative. Prospective authors can contact the EBER and the thematic issue editors to discuss their ideas and consult potential submissions.

TOPICS: Topics include, yet are not limited to:

  • Cross-border start-ups
  • Foreigners in business incubators
  • Government policies and international entrepreneurship Inclusive international entrepreneurship
  • Diffusion of innovation between developing and developed regions
  • Innovative businesses models for international entrepreneurship
  • Institutional environments of the home and the host country
  • International diffusion/transfer of innovation International diffusion/transfer of knowledge
  • International diffusion/transfer of management practices
  • International entrepreneurship in the digital economy
  • International social entrepreneurship
  • Knowledge spill-overs from international new ventures
  • The role of foreign entrepreneurs in the society

Description of the Thematic Issue

BACKGROUND

Since its “opening” nearly 40 years ago, China has been attracting foreign entrepreneurs. Now, being the world’s second-largest economy, a member of the World Trade Organization as well as other global and regional economic blocks and cooperation agreements, the country remains a magnet for businesspeople from all around the world. During the process of China’s impressive economic development foreign entrepreneurs played an important role contributing to the advancement of technology and management practices in China. Yet, while learning from abroad still plays an important role, the focus has been shifting towards development of Chinese own knowledge and enhancing Chinese innovation. Successive Five-Year Plans and state policies explicitly focus on the development of Chinese technologies, patents, know-how, and brands. AIMS The aim of this thematic issue of the Entrepreneurial Business and Economic Review (EBER) is to understand the changing role of foreign entrepreneurs in China with regard to the international diffusion of knowledge, management practices and innovation.

Specifically we ask: what do foreign entrepreneurs learn in China? What is their role in the international diffusion of Chinese technologies and innovation? What kind of management practices do they learn and apply back in their home countries, or spread further across the world? What is the current role of foreign entrepreneurs in the advancement of technology in China? Do they bring valuable technologies and managerial practices which can be applied in China? Can foreign entrepreneurs act as catalysts of Chinese innovation?

We are inviting empirical papers investigating subjects within the broad theme of this issue. The EBER journal has a strong tradition of publishing high-quality quantitative research, however, we are open to other research methodologies as well. The list of topics below is indicative. Prospective authors can contact the EBER and the thematic issue editors to discuss their ideas and consult potential submissions.

TOPICS

Covered Topics include, yet are not limited to:

  • Cross-border start-ups
  • Foreigners in business incubators
  • Government policies and international entrepreneurship
  • Inclusive international entrepreneurship
  • Diffusion of innovation between developing and developed regions
  • Innovative businesses models for international entrepreneurship
  • Institutional environments of the home and the host country
  • International diffusion/transfer of innovation
  • International diffusion/transfer of knowledge
  • International diffusion/transfer of management practices
  • International entrepreneurship in the digital economy
  • International social entrepreneurship
  • Knowledge spill-overs from international new ventures
  • The role of foreign entrepreneurs in the society

SUBMISSION

Completed papers must be submitted on or before April 15, 2018 (Central European Time) via the OJS system at https://eber.uek.krakow.pl/index.php/index/login

Submission at: https://eber.uek.krakow.pl/index.php/eber/announcement

Bottom (base) of the Pyramid concept has a long history. The term was first coined by the US President, Franklin D. Roosevelt, in a radio address in 1932. However the concept was popularized in the business literature by C.K. Prahalad much more recently. Since then, study of BoP has captured attention of practitioners and scholars alike (Gollakota, Gupta, and Bork, 2010, Karamchandani, Kubzansky and Lalwani, 2011; Olsen and Boxenbaum, 2009); and four approaches have emerged for strategizing about the BoP: 

Fortune Finding: Prahalad and Hamel (1990) underlined the scale of the world population not included in the global markets, and the potential of fortune-finding by catering to the common needs of this poorest population, by providing low-cost products and extending distribution reach.  
Fortune Creating: London and Hart (2011) postulate that the next generation of BoP business strategies require a shift to “fortune creating” with the four billion consumers, producers, and entrepreneurs who make up the poorest population of the world, so that viable and scale ventures may be designed. 
Fortune Sharing:  Some social entrepreneurship scholars based in the industrialized markets contend the need for the corporations to approach the BoP with a corporate social responsibility mindset, and commit to sharing their wealth with the BoP, rather than seeking to create wealth off or through the BoP (Berkman, 2010; Davidson, 2009).
Fortune Stealing: Some social activists based in the emerging markets maintain that the multinational corporations have been all too enthusiastic to take off with the technological fortune that belongs to the communities in which the poor people have lived for generations, without giving any credit or compensation (for example, see Shiva, 2011).  

Besides understanding and contrasting these approaches, there is also a need to re-examine the concept of the Base of the Pyramid.  While in economic terms, the world’s low-income communities may be at the Base of the Pyramid, in human terms, many low-income communities are known for their hospitality and helping spirit and thus perhaps could be at the Top of the Pyramid (Gupta, 2011; Leisinger, 2007; Rashid and Rahman, 2009). In the informal economy of these communities, the concrete local social context of the humans may matter more than the abstract global economic context of the corporations. Thus, as we democratize and decentralize the discourse by giving voice to the “BoP” communities that have been disconnected from the mainstream global markets, there may be a need to reframe our language.

We propose the concept of Extensional Technological Growth (ETG) as a heuristic for strategies involving the disconnected communities.  We observe that a flip side of the weak linkages of the low-income communities with the global markets has been the preservation of the uniqueness of the technological base of the people in these communities (Gupta, 2008). This people’s technological base is generally locally efficient, relying on the complementarity of the locally available and distributed resources (Cooke, 2006). In several nations, efforts are beginning to be made to connect alternative and diverse technological bases across multiple community groups and construct innovative, scalable, and disproportionately proficient technological base (Gupta, 2011). These efforts have a potential to generate extensional technological growth (ETG), connecting beyond the mainstream boundaries and channels for augmenting technological capabilities.

Issues related to disconnected communities are particularly relevant for emerging economies of South Asia[1], where 25% of the population currently lives under poverty levels. As South Asia is estimated to provide 30-32% of the increment to the world population into 2050 (World Bank, 2011), as per the traditional understanding of BoP, there is going to be even a greater expansion of the BoP in the region (Khilji, 2011). For the special issue of the South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, we invite papers situated in or inspired by the South Asian context, and that explore theoretical and empirical aspects of topics such as:

1)        Could there be alternative approaches to BoP as popularized by Prahalad? What would the theoretical and practical underpinnings of these approaches?

2)        Is economic wealth really the right perspective to define the base in the BoP? What other perspectives could be used?

3)        How do we engage these disconnected and forgotten communities and what can we learn from them? What approaches, strategies and practices are emerging from these communities that would further our understanding of leadership, management, innovation etc.?

4)        Can social learning and critical theory (and other theories) be used to explain possible strengths of the BoP?

5)        How to improve the ETG ecosystem- nonprofits forming alliances with business vs. nonprofits as mediators between business and people groups;

6)        How to develop the ETG market – seeding and base-building for marketing to the BoP vs. manufacturing for low cost in the BoP vs. pursing ETG with the BoP;

7)        How to leverage the ETG for global markets – green leap of small footprint innovations designed for the BoP vs. buyback of green solutions designed using ETG know-how for the global markets;

8)        How to account for the ETG -- corporate social charity given to the BoP (cost-center) vs. sustainable distributed gain sharing with those contributing to ETG (profit center);

9)        How to fund the ETG business ventures – philanthro-captialists offering patient capital to the central actors vs. microcredit federations offering fast circulation capital to decentralized actors;

10)     Two sides of the ETG entrepreneurship – promoting consumption through marketing initiatives vs. promoting investment through multiplex linkages in the low-income communities

11)      How to design the ETG ventures – for economies of scale through connectivity with the global economic context vs. for economies of choice through sensitivity to the local social context.

We are hoping to use a new lens on the BoP in order to allow us to be more creative and think differently, hence we encourage submissions beyond these questions, as long as these contribute to advancing research, policy and practice related to BoP and ETG. We welcome submission from all business or related disciplines, and are open to multi-disciplinary approaches.

Deadlines:
Abstracts (3 pages) should be submitted by December 15, 2011 to any one of the following guest editors.  Authors of the selected abstracts will be invited to participate in a symposium proposal under the auspices of the South Asian Academy of Management on the topic for the Academy of Management Conference 2012 at Boston, whose theme is “Informal Economy”.

Full Paper deadline (8000 words) via Scholar One to SAJGBR: March 30, 2012.  After screening by the special issue editors, these papers will be double blind reviewed before being accepted for publication.

Anticipated Publication date: Sept 2012

About the Special Issue Editors:

Vipin Gupta (Ph.D., Wharton School) is Professor and Co-director of the Global Management Center at the California State University San Bernardino. He has made significant contributions to the science of culture, sustainable strategic management in the emerging markets, managing organizational and technological transformations, and entrepreneurial and women’s leadership, and is a pioneer in the field of culturally sensitive models of family business around the world. He has authored or edited 16 books, including the seminal GLOBE book on culture and leadership in 62 societies, eleven on family business models in different cultural regions, two on organizational performance, one on the MNCs in China, and an innovative strategy textbook.  He has published about one hundred fifty articles as book chapters and in academic journals, such as the Journal of Business Venturing, Journal of World Business, Family Business Review, International Journal of Cross-cultural Management, and Asia-Pacific Journal of Management, among others. Dr. Gupta has been a Japan Foundation fellow, and a recipient of the Society for Industrial Organizational Psychologists’ coveted “Scott M. Myers Award for Applied Research—2005”.
Email: gupta05@gmail.com

Shaista E. Khilji (PhD, Cambridge University, UK) is the Founding Editor-in-Chief of South Asian Journal of Global Business Research (SAJGBR), and Associate Professor of Human and Organizational Learning at the George Washington University (Washington DC). Her research focuses on issues related to Global Leadership, Talent Development, Innovation, and Cross-Cultural Management with a particular emphasis on emerging economies. She has published several articles in reputable scholarly journals, including the International Journal of Human Resource Management, Journal of World Business, and the Journal of Product Innovation Management, contributed to edited volumes and presented more than 40 research papers at various international conferences. She has received several awards, including “Honorary Lifetime Fellow of Cambridge Commonwealth Society” (UK); “Pride of Profession Award” (India); the “Outstanding Service” and “Best Reviewer” awards by the Academy of Management (USA), “Top 10%” paper award by the Academy of International Business (Italy), and a “Bronze Award” by McGraw Hill Higher Education. She was nominated for the Washingtonian “Rising Star under 40 years” for her all-round academic achievements, “Best International Symposium’ and “Newman’ awards by Academy of Management.
Email: shaistakhilji@gmail.com

About the South Asian Journal of Global Business Research (SAJGBR):

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research (SAJGBR) is dedicated to advancing theoretical and empirical knowledge of business and management issues facing multinational and local organizations within South Asia. It publishes high-quality research articles, insights and reviews which contribute to the scholarly and managerial understanding of contemporary South Asian business issues. SAJGBR is committed to providing a unified platform to publish research that links research communities in South Asia with the rest of the world.

SAJGBR publishes both conceptual and empirical papers that address a variety of business issues within South Asia, in order to inform and advance international business theory and practice. All papers must be based upon rigorous quantitative and/or qualitative methodological approaches. SAJGBR is also open to creative reviews and insights from a variety of people engaged in international business, including policy makers, consultants, practitioners and managers.

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research is a publication of Emerald Publications. For more information, please refer to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=sajgbr 

References:
Berkman, J. (July 9, 2010), “Millions of Hungry Families Are Not a ‘Market Opportunity’”, available at: http://news.change.org/stories/millions-of-hungry-families-are-not-a-market-opportunity.

Cooke, P. (2006), “Global bioregional networks: a new economic geography of bioscientific knowledge”, European Planning Studies, Vol. 14, pp. 1265–1285.

Davidson, K. (2009), “Ethical concerns at the Bottom of the Pyramid: Where CSR meets BOP”, Journal of International Business Ethics, Vol. 2 No. 1, pp. 22-32.

Gollakota, K., Gupta, V., and Bork, J. (2010), “Reaching customers at the base of the pyramid – a two-stage business strategy”, Thunderbird International Business Review, Vol. 52 No. 5, pp. 355-367.

Gupta, A.K. (2011), Various articles and blogs, available at: http://www.sristi.org/anilg/anilgblog.php

Gupta, V, (2008), “Constructing a sustainable technological platform in India”, Vidwat: The Indian Journal of Management, Vol. 1 No. 1, pp. 1-8.

Karamchandani, A., Kubzansky, M., and Lalwani, N. (2011), “Is the Bottom of the Pyramid really for you”? Harvard Business Review, Vol. 89 No. 3, pp. 107-111.

Khilji, S.E. (2011), Population 7 billion and counting: How it would affect us all. Panel talk presented at GW Alumni Weekend celebration, The George Washington University, Washington DC, USA

Leisinger, K. M. (2007), “Corporate Philanthropy: The ‘Top of the Pyramid’”, Business & Society Review, Vol. 112 No. 3, pp. 315-342.

Olsen, M., and Boxenbaum, E. (2009), “Bottom-of-the-Pyramid: Organizational barriers to implementation”, California Management Review, Vol. 51 No. 4, pp. 100-125.

Rashid, A. T., and Rahman, M. (2009), “Making profit to solve development problems: the case of Telenor AS and the Village Phone Programme in Bangladesh”, Journal of Marketing Management, Vol. 25 No. 9/10, pp. 1049-1060.

Shiva, V. (2011), “Navdanya International”, available at: http://www.vandanashiva.org/
________________________________________
[1][1] Including Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.  A broad concept of South Asia might include immigrant communities from the South Asia region, and the influence of the South Asian cultural system worldwide.

Asia Pacific Journal of Management

Special Issue and Conference on “From Emerging to Emerged: A Decade of Development of Dragon Multinationals”

Submission Deadline: April 15, 2015

Conference Place and Date: December, 2015 (tentative dates)

Venue: Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia

Estimated Date of Publication: November 2016

 

Special Issue Guest Editors:

Jane Lu (University of Melbourne and National University of Singapore)

Xufei Ma (Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Lucy Taksa (Macquarie University)

Yue Wang (Macquarie University)

 

Special Issue Consulting Editors:

Mike Peng (University of Texas at Dallas)

Ravi Ramamurti (Northeastern University)

 

Conference Sponsor:

Department of Marketing and Management, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.

 

In 2006, the Asia Pacific Journal of Management (APJM) published an influential article “Dragon multinationals: New players in 21st century globalization” (Mathews, 2006a, 23:5-27). In this conceptual article, John Mathews (Macquarie University, Australia) defines firms from the periphery—especially those from the Asia Pacific region—as ‘dragon multinationals’. The author develops a new model to illustrate the three pillars common in these firms’ pattern of accelerated internationalization and summarizes them into his linkage, leverage, and learning (LLL) model.

According to Mathews (2006a), for dragon multinationals, the best and the quickest way to capture global opportunities and to tap into global resources is first to link up with firms around the global, second to leverage such links to overcome resource barriers (including foreign direct investment (FDI) through acquisitions), and third to learn to build up their own capabilities in a cumulative fashion. These three pillars of linkage, leverage and learning are what make dragon multinationals’ international expansion distinctive from the internationalization pattern of Western incumbents.

To the extent that firms that lack initial resources may take advantage of the increasingly interconnected global economy in a pattern consistent with the LLL model, the LLL model may become one of the dominant paradigms in international business (IB) research in the 21st century, just like how the OLI model was viewed by the IB and management community in the 20th century. We do not know whether this significant paradigm development will happen, but the fact that John Mathews’ article won the second APJM Best Paper Award in 2009 and became the second most cited APJM paper ever (with over 600 Google Scholar citations) in just a few years after its appearance in 2006 is a strong signal that the IB and management community may just be ready to embrace such a paradigm development. However, whether such a paradigm development will materialize (Dunning, 2006; Narula, 2006) is at least dependent on two critical issues, which will be addressed in this Special Issue. First, do we have accumulated sufficient evidence to suggest that there is indeed a need for a new paradigm such as the LLL model to account for a very different internationalization process? Second, nearly ten years since Mathews (2006a), do we have sufficient knowledge about ways that those already emerged dragon multinationals (such as Acer, Li & Fung, and Lenovo that appeared in Mathews’ original article) manage their global operations?  

To further enrich our understanding of the merits and limits of the LLL model, we also call for papers that provide new theoretical or empirical insights to help us better understand the internationalization patterns and strategies adopted by firms from the rapidly developing Asia Pacific region including those are still emerging and those already emerged in the global stage. To the extent that management problems remain the same over time while their solutions differ from part of the world to part of the world (Hostede, 2007), we also welcome manuscripts that look at the impact of the emerging or emerged dragon multinationals on the strategies and behaviours of Western MNEs in different parts of the world.

Overall, this Special Issue provides an opportunity to (1) reflect on John Mathews’ influential article on the then emerging dragon multinationals, and (2) bring together research on recent development of those dragon multinationals that are already emerged in the global market as well as research on the interactions between these (relatively) new players and incumbent western players in an increasingly interconnected global business environment. To serve these purposes, manuscripts are not restricted to, but could deal with the following topics:

  • Empirical studies to test the validity of the LLL model in a broader range of firms (including but not limited to emerging and emerged dragon multinationals).  
  • How the strategies, structures, and management practices (e.g. how to manage the challenge of diverse workforce) adopted by those emerged dragon multinationals differ from MNEs from the West and Japan.
  • How the LLL model and OLI model complement or substitute each other.
  • How the expansion of dragon multinationals to regions such as Africa and Australia affects the strategies of Western MNEs in these regions.
  • How the pattern of expansion of dragon multinationals is affected by varying institutional conditions in their home countries.
  • What the performance implications are as a result of the expansion of dragon multinationals.

Papers for the Special Issue should be submitted electronically to the APJM Online Submission System at https://www.editorialmanager.com/apjm/, and identified as submissions to the “From emerging to emerged: a decade of development of dragon multinationals” Special Issue. The deadline for receipt of papers for this special issue is April 15, 2015. The format of submissions must comply with submission guidelines posted at the APJM website. Please indicate that your submission is to be reviewed for the Special Issue on “From Emerging to Emerged: A Decade of Development of Dragon Multinationals” (choose that in the “article type” item during the submission process).

Papers will be double-blind peer-reviewed. We will make initial editorial decisions by July 1, 2015. Authors invited to revise and resubmit their work will be invited to present the papers at a Special Issue development conference hosted by the Department of Marketing and Management at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.

The papers accepted and presented at the special issue conference will be considered for publication in the Special Issue of the APJM. Presentation at the conference does not necessarily guarantee publication in the special issue. The combination of a development conference and a Special Issue nevertheless follows a highly successful APJM initiative to bring out the full potential of authors and papers.

 

For questions about the special issue, please contact any of the Special Issue Editors:

Jane Lu

Professor, Department of Management and Marketing, University of Melbourne; and National University of Singapore

Email: jane.lu@unimelb.edu.au

Xufei Ma

Associate Professor, Department of Management, Chinese University of Hong Kong

Email: xufei@cuhk.edu.hk

Lucy Taksa

Professor, Department of Marketing and Management, Macquarie University

Email: lucy.taksa@mq.edu.au

Yue Wang

Associate Professor, Department of Marketing and Management, Macquarie University

Email:  yue.wang@mq.edu.au

 

References:

Hofstede, G. (2007). Asian management in the 21st century. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 24: 411-420.

Dunning, J. H. (2006). Comment on Dragon multinationals: New players in 21st century globalization. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 23: 139-141.

Narula, R. (2006). Globalization, new ecologies, new zoologies, and the purported death of the eclectic paradigm. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 23: 143-151.

Mathews, J. A. (2006a). Dragon multinationals: New players in 21st century globalization. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 23: 5-27.

Mathews, J. A. (2006b). Responses to Professors Dunning and Narula. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 23: 153-155.

From Resources and Value Chains to Consumer Benefits and Innovation Ecosystems: Demand-Side Perspectives in International Business

Guest editors:

  • Ana Cristina O. Siqueira, Duquesne University
  • Ronaldo C. Parente, Florida International University
  • Richard Priem, Texas Christian University & LUISS Guido Carli University

Deadline: November 20, 2013

1. Purpose of Special Issue

Globalization, companies’ increasing emphasis on innovation, and the fast-paced introduction of new technologies have encouraged companies to search for technologies anywhere in the world (Doz, Santos, & Williamson, 2001), develop technologies in emerging economies (Immelt, Govindarajan, & Trimble, 2009), and manage innovation ecosystems internationally (Adner, 2012). Venturing beyond the sequential notion of value chains (Porter, 1985), some companies have developed collaborative arrangements involving economic transactions and institutional arrangements between suppliers, complementors, and users (Normann & Ramirez, 1993; Stabell & Fjeldstad, 1998). Such “innovation ecosystems” can be understood as networks of interconnected organizations that incorporate both production- and use-side participants who create value through innovation (Autio & Thomas, forthcoming). In an increasingly interconnected world, some firms are able to create more value than any single firm could alone by coordinating innovation ecosystems that cross industry boundaries and national borders.

Demand-side approaches to value creation represent a new, bourgeoning area in the fields of technology innovation, entrepreneurship, and strategic management (Priem, Li, & Carr, 2012). For instance, an earlier symposium at the 2009 meeting of the Academy of Management addressed the topic of “Demand-Side Approaches to Strategy and Innovation: Moving beyond a Resource-Only Focus” and showcased the work in this area by scholars from different countries. More recently, a symposium at the 2012 meeting of the Academy of Management discussed the topic of “Strategy in Ecosystems,” bringing together presenters who have made major contributions to this growing area, such as Ron Adner, Carliss Baldwin, Marco Iansiti, Michael Jacobides, Kathleen Eisenhardt, and Yves Doz.

Demand-side studies have begun investigating key questions such as: how consumer demand may influence innovation decisions (Fontana & Guerzoni, 2008; Sawhney, Verona & Prandelli, 2005; Tripsas, 2008), and how consumer-focused strategies influence value creation and appropriation (Adner & Snow, 2010; Gruber, MacMillan, & Thompson, 2008; Ye, Priem, & Alshwer, 2012). Among these approaches, the perspective of “consumer benefits experienced” (Priem, 2007) examines demand-side strategies that firms can employ to create value. Consumers are arbiters of value by endorsing or rejecting the value of innovations (Priem, 2007).

International business researchers have started to examine: how multinational organizations access knowledge distributed across consumer groups and different countries in developing innovations (Wilson & Doz, 2011); how collaboration with upstream suppliers, complementors, and downstream consumers facilitates value creation through innovation in an interconnected world (Autio & Thomas, forthcoming); and the effect of innovation on internationalization (e.g., Zeng & Williamson, 2007). Nonetheless, demand-side approaches in international business remain in their infancy (Gulati, Puranam, & Tushman, 2012), and research from this new perspective is needed for a more complete understanding of how the interaction of organizations within innovation ecosystems influences internationalization. Such research can enrich the international business field.

2. Examples of research themes and questions for the Special Issue

Some illustrative (but not exclusive) demand-side research questions that would be appropriate for this special issue include:

  • How do multinational organizations develop demand-side advantages with ordinary resources?
  • What conditions facilitate the transfer of user-innovation knowledge in multinational organizations?
  • How do multinational organizations drive cross-border innovation ecosystems?
  • What conditions influence the internationalization of innovation ecosystems?
  • How does the internationalization of innovation ecosystems influence the development of new technologies?
  • How do global nonprofit organizations and social enterprises support innovation ecosystems with cross-border collaborations?
  • To what extent does collaboration within an innovation ecosystem enhance the internationalization prospects of emerging market multinationals?
  • How might demand-side approaches help extend the knowledge-based and resource-based views of multinational organizations?
  • To what extent could institutional theory help explain the management of innovation ecosystems across borders?
  • How might traditional international business theoretical frameworks such as the Uppsala internationalization model benefit from demand-based approaches?

3. Submission Instructions

The deadline for submission of manuscripts is November 20, 2013. Manuscripts should be prepared in accordance with Journal of International Management’s Style Guide for Authors: http://www.elsevier.com/journals/journal-of-international-management/1075-4253/guide-for-authors.

Manuscripts should be electronically submitted to: http://ees.elsevier.com/intman.  To ensure that all manuscripts are correctly identified for review in relation to the special issue it is important that authors select “Demand-Side Perspectives” when they reach the “Article Type” step in the submission process.  All submissions will be subject to the regular double-blind peer review process at JIM.

Please direct any questions regarding the Special Issue to Ana Siqueira (siqueiraa@duq.edu) with a copy to Ronaldo Parente (rcparent@fiu.edu) and Richard Priem (r.priem@tcu.edu).

4. References

Adner, R., & Snow, D. 2010. Old technology responses to new technology threats: Demand heterogeneity and technology retreats. Industrial and Corporate Change, 19: 1655–1675.

Adner, R. 2012. The wide lens: A new strategy for innovation. New York, NY: Penguin Books

Adner, R., & Kapoor, R. 2010. Value creation in innovation ecosystems: How the structure of technological interdependence affects firm performance in new technology generations. Strategic Management Journal, 31(3): 306−333.

Autio, E., & Thomas, L. D. W. Forthcoming. Innovation ecosystems: Implications for innovation management. In M. Dodgson, N. Philips, & D. M. Gann (Eds), The Oxford handbook of innovation management. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Doz, Y., Santos, J., & Williamson, P. 2001. From global to metanational: How companies win in the knowledge economy. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Fontana, R., & Guerzoni, M. 2008. Incentives and uncertainty: An empirical analysis of the impact of demand on innovation. Cambridge Journal of Economics, 32: 927–946.

Gruber, M., MacMillan, I. & Thompson, J. 2008. Look before you leap: Market opportunity identification in emerging technology firms. Management Science, 54: 1652–1665.

Gulati, R., Puranam, P., & Tushman, M. 2012. Meta-organization design: Rethinking design in interorganizational and community contexts. Strategic Management Journal, 33: 571–586.

Immelt, J. R., Govindarajan, V., & Trimble, C. 2009. How GE is disrupting itself. Harvard Business Review, October: 56-65.

Normann, R., & Ramirez, R. 1993. From value chain to value constellation: Designing interactive strategy. Harvard Business Review, 71: 65-65.

Porter, M. E. 1985. Competitive advantage: Creating and sustaining superior performance. New York: Free Press.

Priem, R. L. 2007. A consumer perspective on value creation. Academy of Management Review, 32(1): 219−235.

Priem, R. L., Li, S., & Carr, J. C. 2012. Insights and new directions from demand-side approaches to technology innovation, entrepreneurship, and strategic management research. Journal of Management, 38(1): 346−374.

Sawhney, M., Verona, G., & Prandelli, E. 2005. Collaborating to create: The internet as a platform for customer engagement in product innovation. Journal of Interactive Marketing, 19(4): 4−17.

Stabell, C. B., & Fjeldstad, Ø. D. 1998. Configuring value for competitive advantage: On chains, shops, and networks. Strategic Management Journal, 19: 413−437.

Tripsas, M. 2008. Customer preference discontinuities: A trigger for radical technological change. Managerial and Decision Economics, 29: 79–97.

Wilson, K., & Doz, Y. L. 2011. Agile innovation: A footprint balancing distance and immersion. California Management Review, 53 (2): 6-26.

Ye, G., Priem, R. L., & Alshwer, A. 2012. Achieving demand-side synergy from strategic diversification: How combining mundane assets can leverage consumer utilities. Organization Science, 23(1): 207−224.

Zeng, M., & Williamson, P. J. 2007. Dragons at your door: How Chinese cost innovation is disrupting the rules of global competition. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Over the past decade, Frugal Innovations have garnered the attention of management scholars and practitioners due to their high economic potential and rapidly growing adoption in business. With its roots in emerging economies, Frugal Innovation as a concept has come a long way from focusing on subsistence marketplaces to being applied to address global challenges such as changing demographics and climate change. Specifically, in light of the ongoing digital revolution and arrival of new business models such as sharing and circular economy, Frugal Innovations are being explored on a global scale from various new perspectives. The focus is drifting away from merely being ‘cost’ and ‘BoP’ driven innovations to being ‘green’ and ‘sustainable’ innovations. However, unlike this shift, a large part of current research on Frugal Innovation is still oriented towards BoP markets and low-cost strategies. 

Marking the start of a new wave of Frugal Innovation research, this book comes at an appropriate time to encourage academicians to explore the concept of Frugal Innovation from new perspectives and set future research agenda. To discuss different product development strategies and tools that are being employed by organizations across the globe to implement Frugal Innovations. Furthermore, this book also aims to discuss the recent and upcoming trends and their impact on frugal innovations strategies.

Hence, the aims of this book are:

  • Starting a new wave in Frugal Innovation research
  • Exploring Frugal Innovation from new perspectives
  • Set future research agenda

Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Frugal Innovation as a worldwide phenomenon
  • Reverse Innovation – the global answer to frugality?
  • Frugal Engineering fostering Frugal Innovation
  • Digital Revolution as a driver of frugality
  • Circular Economy and Sustainability
  • Technological Innovation and Disruption
  • Frugal Ecosystems in the age of Sharing Economy

We encourage specific papers from both a SME and MNC perspective.

Prospective authors should send their manuscripts electronically to the following email address: (Nivedita.agarwal@fau.de), with the subject title as: " Frugal Innovation and its Implementation- Book Chapter". Submitted manuscripts will be refereed by at least two independent and expert reviewers for quality, correctness, originality, and relevance. Submitted manuscripts (around 20 pages) should conform to the standard guidelines of the Springer's book chapter format.

Timeline

Submission of abstracts                        August 1st 2019 

Submission of full manuscripts            November 1st 2019

Review Feedback                                   January 15th 2019

Revised paper submission                    March 15th 2020

Publication                                              Winter 2020

We are inviting academic editorial contributors to a new 1-volume encyclopedia about major marketing strategies, with assignments focused on 100 major marketing strategies for some of the top global and emerging brands from 2011 – 2012. Entries include major product/service, mobile app, social media, brand development, packaging, and television strategies amongst other types. Each entry (2,500 - 3000 words) provides situational analysis, information on the target market, overview of the marketing strategy, and outcome.

Here are a few of the available entries: Product Advertisement Advertising Company FUJIFILM X100 The Sect of Wandering Photographers Mutual Workshop Limited Hong Kong IKEA IKEA e-folder Laboratory Ideas Kft. Budapest Mercedes-Benz The Invisible Drive Jung von Matt Hamburg B-Class F-Cell MTV Balloons Loducca Sao Paulo Nike 360 Control - Binaural Mix - Use Headphones Factory London Football Boot Nokia Pure Twenty-six characters, an alphabetical journey Nokia London Peugeot Reaction Time Euro RSCG Zurich Zurich Skoda Curriculum Vitae weareflink GmbH Hamburg And More...

We are making article assignments with a submission deadline of December 24, 2012, or sooner. If you are interested in contributing to the Gale Encyclopedia of Major Marketing Strategies, it can be a notable publication addition to your CV/resume and broaden your publishing credits. Moreover, you can help ensure that accurate information and important points of view are credibly presented to students and library patrons. Compensation is an honorarium payment of $.03 per word and contributors receive credit for their work in the List of Contributors in the front of the encyclopedia. The list of available entries with a link to the Clio Award site for each entry, style guidelines and sample entry will be sent upon request. Upon receipt of the materials you will select the unassigned entries (without a name in the contributor column) that best suit your interests and expertise, and send your selection to me for confirmation and assignment.

If you would like to contribute to building a truly outstanding reference with the Encyclopedia of Major Marketing Strategies, please contact me by the e-mail information below. Please provide a brief summary of your background in marketing/advertising or provide your CV. Thanks for your time and interest. Best, Sue Moskowitz Author Manager Golson Media work@golsonmedia.com

Guest Editors:

Carin Smaller, Advisor on Agriculture and Investment, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), &

Kathleen Sexsmith, Assistant Professor of Rural Sociology, Pennsylvania State University (Incoming Fall 2017)

Dear Fellow Scholars and Researchers:

Multinational enterprises (MNEs) in the agricultural and extractive sectors are increasingly adopting voluntary guidelines for economic, social, and environmental responsibility along their supply chains, in response to public demands for greater accountability and a stronger contribution to sustainable development. While these initiatives have had strong positive impacts in several areas, the actors involved have paid less attention to gender inequities and inequalities. Indeed, MNEs, governments, and standard-setting organizations have moved slowly and unevenly to address the gendered consequences of MNE activities in the communities where they operate. The result is a diverse set of investor practices, national policies, laws, sustainability standards, guidelines, and certification criteria that take many different approaches to gender issues. Researchers do not know enough about the impacts on gender roles and relations in communities when MNEs adopt responsible investing approaches in their international investment activities. They also do not know enough about the differences in their outcomes, or which approaches work best.

Taken together, initiatives to support MNEs in their efforts to contribute to gender equality in the communities where they operate have yet to realize their full potential. For example, some sustainability initiatives for cross-border agricultural and land investment, like Fairtrade, UTZ Certified, the CFS Voluntary Guidelines for the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests, and the Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems, are gender-mainstreamed in their content and take a gender-sensitive approach to implementation. Yet, some other initiatives in the agricultural and land sector include only vague non-discrimination principles. Moreover, even the most gender-sensitive agricultural investment initiatives have struggled with how to address gender bias at the level of local cultures. In the mining, oil, and gas sectors, global standards like the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative have done little to address the negative impacts of resource extraction on women’s safety in conflict zones, their exclusion from employment opportunities, and their unpaid labour burden. Although there is still plenty of work to be done, interest in the potential contributions of MNEs to gender equity and equality through responsible international investment at the current moment is high.

This special issue will focus on the gender dynamics of cross-border investments in the agricultural and extractive sectors, specifically in terms of the policies, laws, sustainability standards, guidelines, and certification criteria that shape the gendered outcomes of investments by MNEs. It will seek articles that address one or more of the following topics:

  1. The historical and political processes through which gender has come to be included – however unevenly – in the major sustainability initiatives that MNEs adopt;
  2. Analysis of the direct and indirect impacts of MNEs adopting these initiatives on gender relations and women’s empowerment in the communities where they are implemented;
  3. The influence (or the capacity to influence) of these initiatives on MNE behaviour, sustainable development, and national laws or policies in these sectors;
  4. A closely related topic agreed upon with the guest editors.

An important criterion for article selection will be relevance of findings to MNEs, policy discussions, the practical concerns of governments, intergovernmental organizations, civil society organizations and communities engaging with these initiatives. Comparative research is particularly welcome.

Length of contributions: Between 5000–8000 words (plus an abstract not exceeding 150 words)

Submission deadline: November 15, 2017.

Authors are requested to submit their manuscript by email to: tncj@unctad.org

Please send questions regarding this special issue and submissions to:

Kathleen Sexsmith <kjs256@cornell.edu>

Summary

Global leadership has served as a hallmark topic in leadership research for the past few decades, in response to an unprecedented growth of international firms and markets (Ajarimah, 2001; Caligiuri, 2006; Gentry et al., 2014; Khilji et al., 2010; Mendenhall et al., 2012). However, scholars have described it as a western-centric (Arvey et al., 2015), seemingly age-blind (Spisak et al., 2014) and male-dominated (Kyriakidou, 2012; Syed & Murray, 2008) field. The intersectional effects of gender, age and other forms of identity remain relatively under-explored in the leadership literature. Arvey et. al. (2015) note that western scholars and western data predominantly drive global leadership research. To energize this field and add to theoretical significance (Glynn & Raffaelli, 2010), it is important to examine global leadership and its interplay with gender and inter-generations in non-western or ‘unconventional’ contexts (Bamberger & Pratt, 2010; Khilji & Rowley, 2013; Scandura & Dorfman, 2004; Steers et al., 2012).

For the past two decades, South Asia has attracted greater interest among business leaders, politicians and academics alike. It has become one of the most dynamic and fast-growing regions in the world, which many multinational companies consider as an important strategic growth market for their business activities, as they invest in local production facilities and integrate domestic companies into their value chains (Khilji, 2012; Khilji & Rowley, 2013). Goldman Sachs (2011) predicts continued development in the region- as India is likely to emerge as world’s second largest economy by 2050, and Bangladesh and Pakistan have a high potential of becoming two of the world’s largest 11 economies (referred to as Next-11) in the 21st century, along with BRIC, (Goldman Sachs, 2011). Recently, Pakistan has attracted US$ 46 billion of investment from China, which is expected to boost Pakistan’s socio-economic development (CNN Money, 2015; The Wall Street Journal, 2015). From a generational perspective, leadership literature has paid relatively less attention to age (Spisak, et al., 2014). Age remains an important issue within South Asia context given the population growth and demographic mix in that region. In stark contrast to many developed countries, South Asia has a significantly younger population that is continuing to grow. If qualified and skilled, then this population is likely to be in high demand in future global labor market (Khilji, 2012; Khilji & Keilson, 2014).

Recent reviews of national talent development initiatives indicate that South Asian countries, particularly Pakistan and Bangladesh, are acutely aware of a long standing ‘leadership deficit’ there, with many reports indicating that the young have a growing level of anxiety about renewal of leadership (Khilji & Keilson, 2014; Masood, 2013). To address this, respective governments have implemented a wide range of leadership development initiatives. Further, scholars have also argued that the Indian subcontinent –given its fast changing environment and resource constraints - should serve as a training ground for future global leaders (Khilji & Rowley, 2013; Power, 2011). In sum, there is a necessity to learn more about leadership in and from South Asia, because demographically and contextually, South Asia is likely to exert significant influences on global leadership research and practice. Specifically, examining South Asian generational views on leadership is likely to offer new insights for future theory and practice of leadership (Pio & Syed, 2014).

From a gender perspective, the leadership field is strongly focused on, and influenced by, men. Some scholars have even argued that the term leadership is “conventionally constructed in masculine terms” (Kyriakidou, 2012, p. 4; Vinkenburg et al., 2011). In order to overcome this limitation, several scholars have undertaken studies to examine leadership through a gender lens (Eagley & Heilman, 2015; Peus et al., 2015). A majority of gender research has adopted an equity and fairness perspective, focusing on the gender gap in leadership (Hausmann, Tyson, & Zahidi, 2011; Peus, et al., 2015; Schuh et al., 2014). While this research has contributed fundamentally to the literature, it may be worthwhile to link leadership studies to broader domains of gender- including gender roles, identity, social location and relationships (Glynn & Raffaelli, 2010). Such topics are not only important for reconsidering the role of gender in leadership and evaluating conceptualizations of leadership but also most appropriate for South Asia where gender inequities appear to be more significant than in the West (UNDP, 2013). However, there are also several South Asian women who are defying organizational and social norms (Pio & Syed, 2013). Some of these women are leading multinational corporations, while others are at the forefront of socio-economic change through their entrepreneurial ventures. For example, Malala Yusafzai’s effort for girls’ right to education, Kiran Mazumdar Shaw’s rise as the Indian biotech queen, Bibi Russell’s building of a pioneering fashion house in Bangladesh, Naina Lal Kidwai’s appointment as the Indian Country Head of HSBC, Nasreen Kasuri as founder of the international chain of Beaconhouse School System in Pakistan and Roshane Zafar’s drive as an award winning Pakistani social entrepreneur.

Through this Special Issue (SI), we want to foster research on gender, generation and leadership from the South Asia region or from a South Asian perspective. The SI seeks to improve understanding of demographic and social development in the context of leadership in South Asia and the factors that influence these developments. With the purpose of providing an unconventional non-western perspective (Bamberger & Pratt, 2010; Khilji & Rowley, 2013) and also in line with the intersectionality perspective (Shields, 2008), we are interested in publishing research that explores South Asian leadership experiences and perspectives about gender, and/or generations. An examination of the intersections between gender and leadership, generations and leadership, and/or generation and gender in leadership (including life course stage and age) can help us to understand changes in gender, intergenerational and other social relations over time. An intersectional lens is helpful to deconstruct categories within which policy makers and academics often confine groups and individuals, providing a nuanced and holistic understanding of how women are located within various social situations and contexts (Shields, 2008). The lens is also useful for developing an understanding of the leadership process – including leadership development in organizations – in terms of how women’s potential as business leaders may be fully utilized, as well as the mechanisms for changes over time. A critical analysis of gender and generations is also crucial to understanding leadership because of the constantly evolving relations between women and men, and between younger and older generations (IIED, 2013).

Both of these approaches encourage South Asian voices to emerge, as these are predominantly absent in the leadership literature. Glynn & Raffaelli (2010) highlight methodological convergence among leadership scholars. To expand the scope as well as focus on theoretical development of the global leadership field, submissions of studies using non-traditional research methods are also encouraged for this SI. In recent years, studies using diverse research methods (such as storytelling, narrative, ethnographic) that have offered rich insights into leadership patterns. Thus, we urge submission of all forms of rigorous analyses as well as critical perspectives. We seek rigorous data-driven and strong conceptual frameworks for this SI. We encourage papers and frameworks that go beyond merely finding cross-cultural, cross-gender and cross-generational differences (or similarities) to highlighting diverse, local and unexplored perspectives that can enrich theoretical developments in global leadership and offer ‘frame-breaking’ insights (Youssef & Luthans, 2012).

The mission of SAJGBR is to advance theoretical and empirical knowledge of business issues facing multinational and local organizations of South Asia and South Asian diaspora. With this in mind, we request only paper submissions that are based upon data collected from any South Asian country, as per the World Bank classification (i.e., Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Topics The purpose of this SI is to offer view of South Asian leadership from gender and generational lens. Thus, authors are allowed to construct their own definition of leadership, gender and generations to be able to incorporate diverse views and conceptualization, and truly capture South Asian perspectives. We are interested in a variety of submissions, so long as they address an issue relating to gender and leadership OR generations and leadership OR a combination of gender, generations and leadership in the South Asian context specifically. We expect contributors to make an important theoretical contribution and clearly incorporate cultural or contextual variations.

Topics could include, but are not limited to:

  1. What are the concepts and perspectives, processes and outcomes of leadership in South Asia? How (and why) are these influenced (or not influenced) by gender and/or generations?
  2. How do South Asian women lead multinational companies and other organizations in South Asian and/or non-South Asian context?
  3. What are some of the current views of gender and generations in leadership in South Asia? What new views are emerging?
  4. How does gender or generations intersect with other forms of identity such as social class, faith, ethnicity, caste and urban/rural background and to what extent do such intersections affect leadership in South Asia?
  5. How is gender reproduced, maintained, negotiated and re-created through practice and development of leadership?
  6. What are salient features of women’s multiple social identities in South Asia? How do these reinforce, neutralize and constitute each other to construct leadership identities?
  7. How are gender and/or generational stereotyping portrayed in South Asian leadership? How does this effect business?
  8. Do the younger generations of leaders act as agents of change. How?
  9. What are the varying gender and/or generational expectations from leadership? How are organizations accommodating these expectations in South Asia?
  10. What is the relationship between global and local ways of understanding gender and generation in leadership?
  11. How is leadership development related to gender and emerging leaders?
  12. Given that entrepreneurial ventures provide women the opportunities to practice leadership (Bullough et al., 2015), how does entrepreneurial creativity and independence allow women to become good leaders? What are some of the opportunities and challenges that women may be faced with as an entrepreneur leader?

For theoretical contributions, we also encourage stocktaking reviews and analyses. If researchers are to pursue this line of research, we strongly encourage them to review Stinchombe’s (2002) conceptualization of theory development, Glynn & Raffaelli’s (2010) meta-analysis of leadership research, and Khilji & Matthew’s (2012) review of research focused upon South Asia.

Submission Guidelines and Schedule

All manuscripts will go a double-blind review process. Submissions should be between 7000-8000 words including references, figures, and tables. Please follow submission guidelines at http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=sajgbr A selection of the submitted papers may also be considered for inclusion into a presentation symposium to be submitted to the 2016 Academy of Management Conference – subject to the paper’s potential and authors’ interest and availability. Hence, submission deadline for full paper and/or expanded abstracts of no less than 4000 words (for consideration for inclusion in the AOM 2016 symposium proposal) is: December 10, 2015

Submission deadline for full paper (for all papers): April 10, 2016

Expected publication date: September 2017

Authors are welcome, though not required, to contact the SI editors to discuss their ideas before formal submission. Please direct all queries to all editors via email: Shaista E. Khilji (shaistakhilji@gmail.com), Jawad Syed (j.syed@hud.ac.uk ), and Mary Sully De Luque (Mary.Sullydeluque@thunderbird.asu.edu ).

Note: The title of the Journal may change from 2017. More information will be shared with authors, when available.

References

Ajarimah, A.A. (2001). Major challenges of global leadership in the twenty-first century. Human Resource Development International, 4(1), 9-19.

Arvey, R., Dhanaraj, C., Javidan, M., Zhang, Z-X. (2015). Are there unique leadership models in Asia? Exploring uncharted territory. Leadership Quarterly, 26, 1-6.

Bamberger, P., & Pratt, M.G. (2010). From the Editors: Moving forward by looking back: Reclaiming unconventional research contexts and samples in organizational scholarship. Academy of Management Journal, 53(4), 655-671.

Bullough, A., De Luque, M.S., Abdelzaher, D., & Heim, W. (2015). Developing women leaders through entrepreneurship education and training. Academy of Management Perspectives, 29(2), 250-270.

Caligiuri, P. (2006). Developing global leaders. Human Resource Management Review, 16, 219- 228.

CNN Money. (2015). Pakistan lands US$ 46 billion investment from China. Available at http://money.cnn.com/2015/04/20/news/economy/pakistan-china-aid-infrastucture/ Last accessed Aug 25, 2015

Eagley, A., & Heilman, M. (2015). Call for papers: Special issue of Leadership Quarterly on gender and leadership. Ely, R.J., Ibarra, H., & Kolb, D.M. (2011). Taking gender into account: theory and design for women's leadership development programs. Academy of Management Learning and Education, 10(3), 474-493.

Gentry, W.A., Eckert, R.H., Munusamy, V.P., Stawiski, S.A., & Martin, J.L. (2014). The needs of participants in leadership development programs: A qualitative and quantitative cross-country investigation. Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, 21(1), 83-101.

Glynn, M.A., & Raffaelli, R. (2010). Uncovering mechanisms of theory development in an academic field: Lessons from leadership research. Academy of Management Annals, 4(1), 359-401.

Goldman Sachs. (2011). People, potential, possibilities. Retrieved from http://www.goldmansachs.com/gsam/docs/funds_international/brochures_and_sales_aids/fund_literature/advisor_brochure_n-11_en.pdf (accessed Aug 25, 2015).

Hausmann, R., & Tyson, L.D., & Zahidi, S. (2011). The Global Gender Gap Report 2011. Retrieved from: http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GenderGap_Report_2011.pdf (accessed Aug 25, 2015).

UNDP (2013). The rise of the South: Human progress in a diverse world. Human Development Report. New York, NY: United National Development Programme.

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Globalization affects people, organizations, nations, and regions. It exerts strong impacts on the driving forces and business landscape, creating and changing strategic opportunities and pressures for economic development, growth, employment, and sustainability. East Central Europe (ECE), the Baltics, and Russia play an increasingly important role in the European region both as emerging markets and competitive players. In contrast to Western European nations and business entities, ECE, the Baltics, and Russia receive more limited and sporadic coverage in business literature. The changing dynamics in the European region and beyond, the unfolding political-economic challenges across the European Union, as well as the rising global power of emerging economic powers such as Brazil, China, India, Russia, and others require knowledge, skills, and methodological platforms inducing strategies and operations in the new and ever changing business landscape. In turn, this facilitates the need for strategic competitive analysis on the national, regional, and company levels. The proposed book strives to contribute to the body of knowledge addressing and connecting these issues into the integrative comparative regional context.

Mission
This book will present a comparative, competitive geo-regional cross-country analysis of ECE, the Baltics, and Russia: implications for international business.

Objectives
o Analyze regional and national business competitiveness of ECE, the Baltics (two emerging European regions) and Russia (a major strategic player in the Commonwealth of Independent States - CIS).
o Contrast and compare ECE, the Baltics, and Russia in geo-regional and national strategic competitive context.
o Explore key strategic strengths, core competencies, weaknesses in a comparative strategic context.
o Identify key business trends, drivers, and dynamics on the national level across ECE, the Baltics, and Russia.
o Examine patterns and trends in regional trade and foreign investment.

Scholarly Value, Potential Contribution/Impact, and Purpose Increasingly powerful forces of globalization sharpen global and geo-regional business competitiveness and political-economic interdependence. They critically impact socio-economic development, job creation, and other strategic priorities at the regional, national, and company levels. The proposed book explores scholarly frontiers and applications in a strategic business study of emerging European regions: ECE, Baltics, and Russia. The book discusses subject issues in a comparative integrative perspective.

Target Audience
This book is designated for scholars, professionals, managers, government agencies, universities, think tanks,  and other individuals, organizations, and institutions interested in a deeper understanding of the geo-regional strategic business dynamics and landscape involving ECE, the Baltics, and Russia. More specifically, the book explores political-economic environment and competitiveness, and provides insights on attractiveness, strategic benefits, costs, and risks of doing business in these regions of Europe in a comparative context.

Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following:
1. GLOBALIZATION, SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, AND COMPETITIVENESS: GLOBAL CONCEPTS, TRENDS, DRIVERS, DYNAMICS, AND GEO-REGIONAL IMPLICATIONS o Competitiveness in the context of globalization o Implications of competitiveness in the regional context: ECE, Baltics, Russia

2. SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND COMPETITIVENESS:  REGIONAL VIEW o Regional potential for socio-economic development, core competencies, and competitive advantages and disadvantages in the global and geo-regional context o Regional trends, drivers, and dynamics in socio-economic development and
competitiveness: comparative view (competing/comparator geo-regions)

--> EAST CENTRAL EUROPEAN (ECE) REGION
-->BALTIC REGION
-->RUSSIA

3. SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND COMPETITIVENESS:  NATIONAL VIEW (list of countries -tentative) Suggested issues to be covered for each country:
National potential for socio-economic development, core competencies, and competitive advantages and disadvantages in the regional context a. Key global business rankings (competitiveness cost of doing business, trade, FDI, risks, etc.) b. Trends, drivers, and dynamics in socio-economic development and competitiveness: comparative view c. Key economic sectors/industries, their dynamics, current state, and future outlook d.
Environment, climate, profile, and patterns in international business (trade, FDI) e. Competitive SWOT analysis (Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities, Threats) f. Best corporate practices in competitiveness .
Domestic forms . Foreign-based/international firms g. Cases/other materials illustrating best practices and lessons in business competitiveness and developments h. Main country-specific sources of information and consulting assistance in doing business (domestic government, international organizations, foreign government, non-profit organizations and think tanks, private consultancies)

EAST CENTRAL EUROPE
o Bulgaria
o Czech Republic
o Poland
o Hungary
o Romania
o Ukraine

BALTIC COUNTRIES
o Estonia
o Latvia
o Lithuania

RUSSIA
o Countrywide
o Leading economic regions

Submission Procedure and Format
Contributors are invited to submit on or before April 30, 2013, a 2-3 page chapter proposal clearly explaining the mission, priorities, structure, and format of his/her proposed chapter. Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by May 15, 2013 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters (written in English under American Psychological Association style, approximately 8,000 words each) are expected to be submitted by August 30, 2013. All submitted chapters are subject to double blind reviews. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.

Publisher
This book
(http://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/call-details/884) is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the "Information Science Reference" (formerly Idea Group Reference), "Medical Information Science Reference," and "IGI Publishing"
imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com<http://www.igi-global.com>. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2014.

Important Deadlines:
Chapter proposal submission: on or before April 30, 2013 Chapter proposal acceptance notification: May 15, 2013 Full chapter submission: August 30,
2013 Review Process: August 30 - October 15, 2013 Review Results to Authors:
October 30, 2013 Revised Chapter Submission: November 30, 2013 Final Acceptance Notifications: December 30, 2013 Submission of Final Chapters:
January 15, 2014 Book publication: 2014 Inquiries and submissions can be forwarded electronically (Word document):

Dr. Anatoly Zhuplev
Professor. International Business and Entrepreneurship
Hilton Center for Business Loyola Marymount University
1 LMU Drive, MS 8385
Los Angeles, California 90045-2659
U.S.A.

E: azhuplev@lmu.edu<mailto:azhuplev@lmu.edu>    Tel: 310. 338 7414  Fax:
310. 338 3000
http://cba.lmu.edu/facultyresearch/facultylist/zhuplev.htm

What makes some organizations more competitive than others in the global marketplace? Is the "global competitiveness" of these organizations driven by structure, strategy, tactics, implementation, opportunities, or, very likely, a combination of one of more of these potential components?

Nowadays, business success depends on expanding the global reach of the organization. Marketing's contribution to the scholarship about what makes some organizations globally competitive is important and unique. In a global marketplace, which is converging in some customer needs and wants and market segments, but also diverging in others, marketing has an opportunity to be very influential in scholarship and practice. A number of articles and also special issues have tackled various topics related to the "competitiveness" theme.

The Special Issue on Global Competitiveness of the Journal of International Marketing aims to extend this literature by publishing a set of articles that will shed greater insights into how marketing can help describe, explain, and predict issues within the scope of organizations being globally competitive. In global markets, there is greater divergence in environmental imperatives and different sets of competitors are typically present. Additionally, it is more common for organizations to have simultaneous competitive and cooperative relationships and/or relationships with multiple partners, who could potentially be direct adversaries to each other. The Special Issue specifically targets "marketing strategy" and "strategic marketing" topics, but with a core focus on global competitiveness.

To address these strategy issues, the Journal of International Marketing is issuing a call for papers for the purpose of advancing international marketing knowledge on firm and SBU-level global competitiveness. In terms of content, papers may be either conceptual or empirical in nature and pursue either theory-building or theory-testing. Topics include (but are not limited to) innovation, entrepreneurship, culture, social, human, and relational capital, knowledge and learning, branding, CSR and sustainability, and internationalization in relation to global competiveness. In terms of methodology, papers may be based on empirical techniques (e.g., case, survey, archival research) or on modeling techniques (i.e., optimization or simulation). Papers that integrate multiple perspectives and/or multiple methodologies are especially encouraged.

Papers targeting the Special Issue should be submitted using the JIM submission system and will also undergo the same review process as regularly submitted papers. The deadline for submission is June 27, 2016. Questions pertaining to the Special Issue should be directed to:

Special Issue Editors:

G. Tomas M. Hult, Ph.D.

Professor and Byington Endowed Chair

Director, International Business Center

Broad College of Business

Michigan State University

645 North Shaw Lane, Room 7

East Lansing, MI 48823-1122

U.S.A.

T: + 1- 517-353-4336 

E: hult@msu.edu

and

Professor Constantine S. Katsikeas

Editor-in-Chief, Journal of International Marketing

Associate Dean (Faculty)

Chair of the Marketing Division

Arnold Ziff Endowed Research Chair in Marketing & International Management

Leeds University Business School

Maurice Keyworth Building

University of Leeds

Leeds LS2 9JT

U.K.

T: +44-(0)-113-343-2624

E: csk@lubs.leeds.ac.uk

Submission to: timothy.coombs@tamu.edu and dan.laufer@vuw.ac.nz

1. Purpose of Special Issue

Examples of crises involving multinationals can be found in the media around the world on a regular basis. Examples of high profile crises involving multinationals include the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, the oil spill in the Gulf by BP, sudden acceleration in Toyota cars, and people becoming seriously ill after using Vioxx, a prescription drug manufactured by the American multinational Merck.

Despite the importance of Crisis Management to both academicians and practitioners, only recently have business journals devoted special issues to the topic (Laufer, 2015), and none to our knowledge in the area of global crisis management.

Crisis Management is defined as “a set of factors designed to combat crises and to lessen the actual damage inflicted by a crisis” (Coombs, 2015). Drawing from the literature in emergency preparedness, crisis management involves four interrelated factors: Prevention, preparation, response and revision (Coombs, 2015). These factors are incorporated in a commonly used three-stage approach describing Crisis Management as involving three phases. The pre-crisis phase (prevention and preparation), the crisis phase (response), and the post-crisis phase (learning and revision).

2. Examples of research themes and questions for the Special Issue

Whereas research has been conducted in all three phases of Crisis Management, most of the research is in the crisis phase and very little has been examined in the international context. This special issue is devoted to this area, and in particular we encourage submission of cross-cultural papers examining how the practice of Crisis Management differs across countries. Both theoretical and empirical submissions are welcome.  The empirical studies can use quantitative or qualitative methods. The following list of themes and questions are meant to be illustrative, not exhaustive, and to provide an indication of topics we are interested in for this Special Issue.

  • Risk Assessment and Diagnosing Crisis Vulnerabilities: Do stakeholders assess risk differently across countries? What cultural factors influence risk assessment?
  • Impact of Crises on Stakeholder Relationships (Employees, Customers, the Media, Shareholders): Do stakeholders react differently to crises across countries? What cultural factors influence the different reactions?
  • Communications During Crises: Do stakeholders react differently to corporate communication strategies across countries? What cultural factors influence the different reactions? Which communication strategies are most effective in a global context?
  • Managing Global Crises: How does a global crisis differ from a localized one? What factors need to be considered by companies in responding to a global crisis?
  • The Role of Corporate Reputation in a Crisis: What role does corporate reputation play in a global crisis? What is the impact of a strong corporate reputation during a global crisis. Is it more or less effective in certain cross-cultural contexts? How is corporate reputation impacted by a crisis? Is it more or less adversely impacted in certain countries? What cultural factors influence the extent of reputational harm?
  • Organizational Learning & Crises: Are employees in certain countries more or less receptive to learning from a crisis, and open to organizational change? What cultural factors facilitate organizational changes following a crisis?

3. Submission Instructions

The deadline for submission of manuscripts is October 31, 2016. Manuscripts should be prepared in accordance with Journal of International Management’s Style Guide for Authors: http://sbm.temple.edu/jim/authors.html. Manuscripts should be electronically submitted to the Guest editors at timothy.coombs@tamu.edu and dan.laufer@vuw.ac.nz. All submissions will be subject to the regular double-blind peer review process at JIM.

4. Contact details

Please direct any questions regarding the Special Issue to one of the g